Teenage boy who was moments away from mass school shooting has sentence

first_img“We are satisfied that it would be appropriate, once we are informed the arrangements are in place, to follow the recommendations made.”  Last September, Warwick Justice Centre was told how the teenager armed himself with the intent of carrying out “a shooting that would have taken a dreadful place in the history of truly wicked crimes” committed in Britain – but had a last minute “change of heart”.The boy, who cannot be named, took the double-barrelled shotgun and 200 cartridges from his father’s cabinet as well as a knife, balaclava and ear defenders.He then spent his first lesson with the firearm concealed in his trousers at Higham Lane School, in Nuneaton, Warwickshire before excusing himself from class and going to a side room.  As he was putting on ear protectors in preparation of his massacre he suddenly saw sense and phoned 999.Judge Andrew Lockhart QC told the youngster: “The consequences of what might have occurred had you carried your plan into effect are too awful to contemplate. “The event was, on your own admissions made at the time, just moments away.”A moment in time separates the pupils and staff of this school from being the subject of a terrible event and a shooting that would have taken a dreadful place in the history of truly wicked crimes committed in this country.” A teenage boy who took a shotgun to school in preparation for a mass shorting has had his six year sentence overturned after an appeal court judge said he is a “model son”.The 15-year-old boy was jailed last September after a court hear he had been  “moments away” from carrying out a high school massacre after going to class with a shotgun, knife, balaclava and 200 rounds of ammunition.But this week, Lady Justice Hallett said he had shown only a “fleeting intention” to use the gun at his Warwickshire school last June, before contacting police.She agreed with social workers who said he should be freed under supervision. Lady Justice Hallett, sitting with two other senior judges at the Court of Appeal on Wednesday, acknowledged the boy quickly “came to his senses” after loading the gun and called police to the school himself.”It was when he was putting on his ear protectors that he changed his mind and rang the police,” she said.The teenager, who had been suffering from severe depression and social anxiety at the time, had “exhibited no aggressive or disruptive behaviour before this incident,” she added.Social workers recommended that the boy’s release includes a rehabilitation package. “We have concluded that this is a case in which the welfare of this child goes hand in hand with the protection of the public,” Lady Justice Hallett said. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more