Could you spare 1p a day?

first_img  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis This week saw the launch of the #1paday (1p-a-day) campaign by Cerebra UK. They are encouraging supporters to get involved by giving just 1p a day to Cerebra through microdonation website ploink! and use a link that takes supporters directly to their ploink! page.www.ploink.co.uk/charity/cerebraThe campaign is based on the fact that if everyone on their Facebook page joined in it would raise over £8000 a year.This equates to 10 computers, 7 buggies or 16 SALT (Speech And Language Therapy) vouchers worth up to £500 eachCerebra are encouraging people to get involved by tweeting and facebooking about it and they provide some words that people can use if they want to “I just joined the #1paday campaign for @CerebraUK http://www.ploink.co.uk/charity/cerebra @Ploink”Editor’s notes:Cerebra is a unique charity set up to help improve the lives of children with brain related conditions through researching, educating and directly supporting children and their carers. Registered Charity Number: 1089812.Link to facebook campaign http://www.facebook.com/notes/cerebra/cerebra-1paday-campaign/493930827050.Ploink is a microdonation website that allows people to give as little as 1p at a time to their favourite charities by having digital charity collection boxes on the ploink website. There is also a facility that enables ploink to automatically put any amount in daily.This article was written by Marc Simpson, founder of ploink. [email protected] Howard Lake | 8 February 2011 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Could you spare 1p a day?center_img Advertisement Tagged with: Facebook Individual giving microdonations social media Twitter About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Building a Culture of Openness: Industry Lessons From 20 Years of Open Source

first_imgAmong my fascinations with open source is its cultural evolution. Open source demonstrates how much can be accomplished when we genuinely work together. Given that 2017 is the 20th anniversary of The Cathedral and the Bazaar, this seems like an appropriate moment to appreciate some of the long-term effects – particularly in non-technical terms.Look at how much has been done! From the start, open source has been a home-grown effort. Projects self-organize. Nobody inflicts boundaries; the community makes up the rules as it goes along. Leaders step forward based on technical excellence or their ability to communicate. Individuals contribute code, documentation, test suites; they collaborate on standards and interoperability techniques.Even more impressively: Quite often everyone does this for idealistic reasons. Sometimes they are simple goals, such as, “We want software that works, and that we can rely on.” But even when individuals, organizations, and businesses contribute to an open source community for reasons of enlightened self interest, it helps other people. As Linus Torvalds commented some years ago, “Open source only really works if everybody is contributing for their own selfish reasons. Now, those selfish reasons by no means need to be about ‘financial reward,’ though.”An open community for features and functionalityOpen source has also encouraged experimentation with business models, and a willingness to fail as long as someone could learn from the experience.Once, if you had a bright idea for a new application you either had to create it yourself (a difficult prospect for anything beyond a simple shareware application) or to convince some kind of gatekeeper (perhaps a venture capitalist) to fund it. Open source suggested – successfully – that it was possible to create freely-available software that anyone could use, and the bills would be paid by support services, training, and other extras.And that was just for its first act.Back when the only enterprise software was proprietary, it would never occur to you to develop a product that didn’t have a full set of features. Everything had to be self-contained, because the application had to stand alone. Adding to the ecosystem in any way was an expensive proposition, whether it was a partner program, hardware drivers, or additional application templates.Instead, open source communities said, “You want that feature? Cool. Build it yourself, and integrate it with the application so others can use it, too.”As a result, in today’s marketplace, vendors build the basic functionality and open up the API to a development community. Users and would-be partners develop what they need, which can be anything they think is going to succeed.Developing with APIs has transformed this industry. We now take open communities for granted.For instance, reports BetaNews, Amazon has made it cheaper to build and host Alexa skills using Amazon Web Services (AWS). “Previously, developers have had at their disposal the AWS Free Tier, offering a million AWS Lambda requests and a total of 750 hours of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) – monthly, for free. However, exceeding these limits also meant monthly fees.”Contrast that Alexa adoption to Siri. Arguably, Siri has equal feature sophistication, but it’s not open. The result is Alexa getting more mindshare, not to mention useful capabilities.It’s created markets and industriesThe culture of open development has also enabled the invention of whole businesses that would otherwise be impossible.For example, drone technology has been available for a long time. But for decades, the cost of building and using drones was so high that they were only used by governments, usually in military contexts. But as the drone software opened up, the market took off. Drones made a complex technology consumable by the masses and by businesses.The same can be said for bioinformatics, where a culture of sharing may save lives. Think of people’s willingness to share their own DNA with companies like 23andMe, which use Big Data technologies to match ancestors and develop health trends. People are contributing their most proprietary information, the DNA record about their human likeness, to a community of individuals for the greater good.The openness is a hallmark of open source, and it’s a key part of cloud development. So is scalability, for both technologies and support systems. As the resources grow, so does the capability. That too has enabled business models that were not attainable otherwise, such as Snapchat and Uber.A culture of opennessIt isn’t as though these human desires to share information are something new in the world in the last 20 years. It’s among the nicest things we can say about ourselves that we humans have always been willing to share knowledge for community benefit. Certainly it’s reflected in the history of computing, such as techies sharing their designs at the Homebrew Computer Club (well documented in Fire in the Valley, should you want to know more).However, open source made sharing information a business practice, not just something individuals did on their own. An enterprise can ask an open source community to provide features and functions that wouldn’t exist otherwise – and then everyone benefits by the improvement.Oh no, not another learning experienceNot all these changes happened seamlessly or well. For example, we’ve seen open source develop the culture of valuing simplicity. Because processes are open and because everyone has an equal contribution, there’s no “boss” to turn to for an executive decision. There’s no point at which someone makes a call. When you have too many people, too much opinion slows things down. And since everybody’s voice is equal, progress on large projects can be slow and overly complex.But I like to think that we learn from experience, and that that too is a benefit of the open source culture. When we’re free to try new things, we discover what works. One of those discoveries is “how many people can create something.” For example, The Open SSL project is written by two guys (both named Steve, which does not appear to be a requirement for success). Open SSL is open for anyone to consume and share but the reality is it’s an oligarchy. Even though everyone in the community has a voice, we end up with a few people leading. Everybody gets a vote – but at some point someone’s voice has to be overruled.That’s quite a journey in 20 years. What do you think will be different in the next 20? Ultimately, I believe we will all have slightly different reactions to these ideas, so in the true spirit of Open Source, I encourage everybody to reach out to me in the comments section below, or hit me up on Twitter @quityourjoshing.last_img read more

The Heidi Chronicles’ Ali Ahn on Geeking Out & Keeping Her Day Job

first_img Stage & Screen Cred: Ahn has appeared off-Broadway in Sugar House and Twelfth Night and on screen in Liberal Arts, Blue Bloods, White Collar, Ugly Betty and Louie. “I was a super-intense kid. I wanted to either be a mad scientist or an Olympic figure skater. And I was really into gymnastics, so I would do ridiculous things like tape out the measurements of a balance beam on the carpet and try to teach myself tricks.” The Heidi Chronicles “I went to Yale for history because I never thought I could act as a career. I wanted to go to a school where I could geek out, but also be able to do as much theater as I wanted, and it was perfect for that. I don’t think I’ve ever been as sleep deprived as I was back then.” Related Shows “When I auditioned, I thought, ‘I’m never going to get this job.’ As an Asian-American woman, I can count on two hands the plays in New York I’ve auditioned for. When I got the call, I was living in an illegal basement with no light. It was literally like the heavens opened up: ‘Here’s a gift for you!’” Hometown: Pasadena, CA Age: “Barely legal.”center_img “Even though I’m on Broadway, I still have a day job. The reality of living in this city is pretty grim. I teach and tutor writing, and it’s great. I have wonderful students and it exercises a different part of my brain.” “My grandmother passed away during tech, so the first performance was such a roller coaster of emotions for me. She immigrated here from Korea, and I don’t think she could have ever dreamed her granddaughter would be doing this. Life can be so amazing and so unexpected.” Show Closed This production ended its run on May 3, 2015 Current Role: A vibrant Broadway debut as Susan Johnston, the outspoken best friend of Heidi Holland (played by Elisabeth Moss) in the new revival of Wendy Wasserstein’s The Heidi Chronicles. View Comments “My piano teacher was [playwright] David Henry Hwang’s mother—I studied for 11 years. She had this giant poster of him winning the Tony for M. Butterfly, but at the time, I didn’t even know who he was. She probably wished I practiced piano a little more.”last_img read more

Process Underway to Develop the 2006 Chittenden County Regional Plan

first_imgJuly 2004 begins the process for preparing Chittenden Countys nextRegional Plan. The Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission (CCRPC) will developthe advisory regional plan, which is used to guide public and private decisions affecting landdevelopment, infrastructure, public services, and natural resources. Greg Brown (CCRPCsExecutive Director) notes, The Commission will devote over two years to develop the 2006Regional Plan in order to maximize public involvement at every stage of the process.That process will be quite different from the approach used to prepare the 2001 RegionalPlan. Over the next two years, CCRPC will solicit and use public feedback to prepare a seriesof three draft plans. Each successive draft plan will build upon the previous draft to addressa wider scope of issues in greater detail than its predecessor.The initial stage in the process will be from July to December 2004. From July to September,CCRPC will solicit public feedback on needed refinements to the 2001 Chittenden CountyRegional Plan. From October to December, the Commission will use that feedback to identifythe scope of requested improvements to the 2001 Regional Plan that, when made, will allowit to serve as an initial draft of the 2006 Regional Plan. Brown added, This initial review ofthe 2001 Regional Plan will enable participants to focus their energies on improving whatwe already have, rather than asking the public to work from a blank slate.The Commission next will solicit public feedback on the Initial Draft Plan and use that feedbackto prepare a more detailed Intermediate Draft Plan. CCRPC then will solict public feedback onthe Intermediate Draft Plan and use the feedback to prepare a Public Hearing Draft Plan. Thatdraft will be used in the four-month formal public hearing process required for the Commissionto adopt the Regional Plan. Each draft will improve on the previous draft, based on feedbackprovided by the public.CCRPCs Plan Review and Update Committee (PRUC) will receive and review public feedback onbehalf of the Commission during the 2006 Regional Plan development process. Garret Mott(PRUC Chair and CCRPC Commissioner from Buels Gore) adds, The Commission is committedto working with the public for the betterment of Chittenden County and Northwest Vermont. Itsvery important to the Commission that the 2006 Regional Plan express what the public saysChittenden County should be.CCRPC has set up a special E-mailbox for questions and comment about the 2006 ChittendenCounty Regional Plan and the process that will be used to develop the Plan [email protected](link sends e-mail) org. Additional information and forms for providing the Commissionwith your feedback are available on line at www.ccrpcvt.org/(link is external) 2006regionalplan 2006regionalplan. If you have anyquestions regarding the development of the 2006 Regional Plan please contact:Greg Brown Ian MacDougall Tim FluckExecutive Director Land Use Planner Principal Planner846 846-4490 (Ext. 23) 846 846-4490 (ext.26) 846 846-4490 (Ext. 25)[email protected](link sends e-mail) [email protected](link sends e-mail) [email protected](link sends e-mail)last_img read more

Another dark night for Dodgers as they lose in Matt Harvey’s debut with Reds

first_img Dodgers’ Dave Roberts says baseball’s unwritten rules ‘have changed, should change’ Whicker: Dustin May yet another example of the Dodgers’ eye for pitching Dodgers’ Justin Turner looking rejuvenated on defense Dodgers’ hot-hitting Corey Seager leaves game with back injury Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error PreviousDodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda #18 reacts after giving up a two run homer to the Reds’ Scooter Gennett #3 in the fifth inning during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Scooter Gennett #3 celebrates after hitting a two run homer in the fifth inning during their game against the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe Reds’ Scooter Gennett #3 points to the sky after hitting a two run homer in the fifth inning during their game against the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda #18 reacts after giving up a two run homer to the Reds’ Scooter Gennett #3 in the fifth inning during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda #18 grimaces after giving up a two run homer to the Reds’ Scooter Gennett #3 in the fifth inning during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers Max Muncy #13 throws to first base for the out on the Reds’ Jose Peraza #9 fourth inning during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers Max Muncy #13 throws to first base for the out on the Reds’ Jose Peraza #9 fourth inning during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Reds starting pitcher Matt Harvey #32 during their game against the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers Cody Bellinger #35 slides into third base on a triple as Reds third baseman Eugenio Suarez #7 waits for the throw in the second inning during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Dodgers Chase Utley #26 catches a fly ball hit by the Reds’ Jesse Winker #33 during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodger starting pitcher Kenta Maeda #18 during their game against the Reds at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Chris Taylor, left, and second baseman Chase Utley collide as they try to field a ball hit by Cincinnati Reds’ Jose Peraza during the sixth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. Utley ended up with the ball and forced out Jesse Winker at second. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Cincinnati Reds’ Scooter Gennett, second from left, hits a two-run home run as Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda, left, of Japan, watches along with catcher Yasmani Grandal, right, and home plate umpire Alan Porter during the fifth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 11: Scooter Gennett #3 of the Cincinnati Reds watches his hit go for a two-run homerun to right field in the fifth inning during the MLB game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on May 11, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)Cincinnati Reds’ Scooter Gennett watches his two-run home run in front of Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal during the fifth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Cincinnati Reds’ Scooter Gennett watches his two-run home run off Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda, foreground, during the fifth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda, front, grimaces after giving up a two-run home run to Cincinnati Reds’ Scooter Gennett as catcher Yasmani Grandal stands at the plate during the fifth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda, of Japan, grimaces while getting a new ball from the umpire as Cincinnati Reds’ Joey Votto rounds third on a two-run home run by Scooter Gennett during the fifth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Cincinnati Reds’ Scooter Gennett is congratulated by teammates after hitting a two-run home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 11: Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after hitting a pop fly to third base with one out and a man on second base in the fifth inning during the MLB game against the Cincinnati Reds at Dodger Stadium on May 11, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)Cincinnati Reds’ Jesse Winker, below, is forced out at second as Los Angeles Dodgers second baseman Chase Utley aborts his throw to first on a ball hit by Jose Peraza during the sixth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, left, walks to the mound to remove starting pitcher Kenta Maeda during the fifth inning of the team’s baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds on Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)The Reds’ Tucker Barnhart slides into second base on a double as the Dodgers’ Max Muncy waits for the throw during the fifth inning of Friday’s game at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Cincinnati Reds center fielder Billy Hamilton collides with the wall as he tries to catch a ball hit for a triple by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Chris Taylor during the fifth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Cincinnati Reds center fielder Billy Hamilton collides with the wall as he tries to catch a triple by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Chris Taylor during the fifth inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy celebrates after hitting an RBI double during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds on Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Scott Alexander throws during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds on Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy, top, runs to first on a solo home run off Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher Austin Brice, foreground, during the seventh inning of a baseball game Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy gestures as he nears the plate with a solo home run during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds on Friday, May 11, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 11: Catcher Tucker Barnhart #16 of the Cincinnati Reds celebrates with pitcher Raisel Iglesias #26 of the Cincinnati Reds after their 6-2 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers in the MLB game at Dodger Stadium on May 11, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda #18 reacts after giving up a two run homer to the Reds’ Scooter Gennett #3 in the fifth inning during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 30Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda #18 reacts after giving up a two run homer to the Reds’ Scooter Gennett #3 in the fifth inning during their game at Dodger Stadium Friday, May 11, 2018. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)ExpandLOS ANGELES — In town for the Dodgers’ “Alumni Weekend” events, legendary left-hander Sandy Koufax was in the front row of the owner’s box for most of Friday night’s game at Dodger Stadium.Too bad – he shouldn’t see them like this.Lifeless on offense and inadequate on the mound, the Dodgers were handled easily by a team accused of tanking its season – again – losing for the second consecutive night to the Cincinnati Reds 6-2.Over the past 2-1/2 weeks, the Dodgers have lost six of eight games against the three worst teams in the National League – the Miami Marlins, San Diego Padres and Reds. They are the only NL teams with worse records than the Dodgers.center_img Matt Harvey looked out of place in his Reds debut, the one-time toast of New York no longer a “Dark Knight” in Reds gear. But the Dodgers helped him look like his old self.“I hear ya,” Roberts said when reminded of Harvey’s 6.00-plus ERA and the struggles that led to the New York Mets dumping him. “He got our guys out tonight.”Limited in his pitch count, Harvey went only four innings but he should have left with a no-hitter going. He retired 12 of the first 13 Dodgers batters, allowing only one baserunner when Cody Bellinger’s high fly ball in the second inning was lost in the evening sky by Reds right fielder Scott Schebler. It fell for a triple – Bellinger having learned to leg such things out more aggressively.The Dodgers didn’t have another baserunner until the fifth inning when Chris Taylor tripled off the center field wall and Max Muncy doubled off the left field wall to produce a run. Muncy homered in the seventh for the other one.Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.But the Dodgers finished the night 1 for 9 with runners in scoring position, failing to advance Bellinger after that one-out triple, Muncy after his one-out RBI double or Chase Utley after he singled and moved into scoring position with one out in the sixth.After that one, Yasmani Grandal and Matt Kemp each took called third strikes against Reds reliever Austin Brice. Kemp put his bat to another use – kindling. He snapped it over his knee as he retreated to the dugout, grumbling over home plate umpire Alan Porter’s strike zone. Porter retaliated by ejecting Kemp from the game.That was the most excitement produced during a Dodgers’ half-inning all night.Since scoring 15 runs and going 12 for 27 with runners in scoring position during the first game of a doubleheader in San Francisco on April 28, the Dodgers are 19 for 108 (.176) with RISP while averaging 3.2 runs per game – and losing nine of 13 games.Related Articles “Momentum is real. I think so. I believe in it,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “I believe in making your own breaks and being proactive. But when you get behind and see the same old thing again, that’s contagious too. As opposed to getting behind and saying, ‘We’re going to win.’ Those thoughts are contagious too.“But you have to win games to create that. It doesn’t just manifest itself out of thin air. You’ve got to live it first. We haven’t done that consistently.”They have lived this often enough that Roberts acknowledged his post-game remarks – bemoaning a lack of offense and falling behind early while crediting his team’s effort – have become rote. They certainly rang hollow Friday night.“I just know we still believe in the guys we have in the clubhouse,” Roberts said. “The worm’s gotta turn at some point. I believe it will. Sooner would certainly be better.”The same issues that have brought the Dodgers to this low state were on display for Koufax and all to see Friday. “No one is trying to make outs. I can promise you that,” Roberts said. “But right now it’s just not happening. Really you can try to analyze it. You can say whatever you want. Everyone can have their thoughts and opinions. But right now we’re just not in sync. It’ll turn. It will turn.”Dodgers starter Kenta Maeda didn’t have a very good evening either. He allowed eight of the first 16 batters he faced to reach base and gave up five runs on nine hits in only 4-2/3 innings.The loss was the Dodgers’ 12th in their past 17 games and dropped them six games under .500 (16-22) for the first time since June 2013.“I don’t know. I just know it’s not happening,” Roberts said. “Everyone is trying. They’re all trying to win. It’s just not happening.“We know we’re better than this. We’ve got to keep believing it. It hasn’t shown itself recently. But to just keep grinding, that’s all we can do.” Dodgers bench slumping Cody Bellinger for a day last_img read more