3 rules on how to use VR data analytics for your product

first_imgYou’ve heard about it in the office, read about it in the New York Times, and maybe even demoed it in the NYC Samsung store — virtual reality is here and is capturing the curiosity of consumers and transforming the way businesses operate.Marketers, gamers, teachers, entrepreneurs, producers, you name it — everyone wants a piece of the shiny new industry. Why now?See also: What brands need to know about AR and VRVR has been around for decades and yet, according to Google, search volume about the topic has increased by 400 percent in the past year alone. Vast technological improvements have recently equipped the industry with the proper tools to show consumers the power of immersive media to transform our world.While the concept of virtual reality has been around since the ’60s, the actual benefits of extracting and analyzing data from VR experiences have just been gifted to the world in a big red bow. Let’s unwrap it and see if it fits.#1: There is no industry without analyticsEconomic standards do not exist until industries create them; this is not accomplished until data is used for what it does best — provide answers. Whether it’s Google Analytics data for the web or Nielsen statistics for television, every company must be able to draw accurate analyses from their data.Play counts don’t cut it in 2017. What knowledge do you gain from page views and click counts? Does a click prove actual viewability? And does a view prove engagement? Of course not. View, share, and click metrics don’t incorporate human visual perception. Thus, by not taking actual consumer actions into account, there’s no real value stemming from the data.In contrast, effective virtual reality analytics provide you with statistics of the trends and outliers that you weren’t aware of but should be; when creating and revising your content. VR analytics provide real value in understanding your audience’s preferences and behavior. Once a deep understanding is achieved, the opportunities are endless. Refine your target market, strategy, reach or whatever it may be, because knowing your audience’s varying tastes provides answers to the questions you didn’t even know you had.#2: Attention is the currency of the 21st centuryData is the new gold standard. The New York Times stated in 2007 that people saw an average of 5,000 ads per day; imagine how many ads we see as media evolves. We live in a world full of distractions, so it’s increasingly rare to have someone’s complete attention.Virtual reality provides the opportunity for an experience totally void of distraction, letting the user naturally engage with the experience. Use the world’s newfound enthusiasm and curiosity for VR to your advantage. Make use of the time consumers spend in this intimate world wisely by logging what users are looking at as actionable business intelligence.Virtual reality users generate data regardless of whether or not you take action — it’s a matter of collecting and sorting the data. For the first time, the combination of the user’s physical behavior and their physical interaction from the VR headset actively tells you what people are engaging with — you just have to listen.#3: Make sure there’s a “what” behind the “wow”We’ve all seen it — the smiles, the laughs, the screams, the squelches — but not all VR experiences are the same. Let’s put it this way: if we go see a comedy, we aren’t laughing at the same jokes or even if we are, we aren’t necessarily laughing for the same reasons. So why does VR elicit the reactions that it does?Understanding the semantics helps us solve the equation — it’s simple algebra. We have the solution, now let’s solve for the variable — what gets users to that “wow” moment. The “wow” is the optimal outcome of the VR experience, while the “what” is the user’s participation or contemplation.When Kevin Durant was considering leaving the Oklahoma City Thunder to join the Golden State Warriors, the Warriors co-owner, Peter Guber, wanted Durant to feel what it was like to be a Warrior. Since Durant was still playing for the Thunder and couldn’t publicly announce his possible move to the Warriors, he couldn’t go to Oakland to see the locker room or have a feel for the court and the team.Or could he? An enthusiast of both basketball and virtual reality, Guber made a custom VR experience to show KD what it would really be like to be a Golden State Warrior. While actually sitting on a couch in the Hamptons, Durant was virtually walking around the Oracle Arena with fellow Warriors Steph Curry, Draymond Green, Klay Thompson, and other future teammates. He felt the team’s camaraderie inside the Warrior’s huddle, he saw the spirit of the players as they ran out to court on game night, he heard the crowd go wild at tip off; he got a true taste of what it would be like to be a Golden State Warrior.But which of those feelings overwhelmed him to the point of wanting to be a part of their team? Wouldn’t it be valuable for the Warriors to know exactly what Durant was watching when he agreed to sign with them? On a macro level, imagine if we could have this information for even a quarter of the players in the NBA. We’d know what these players care most about and what truly drives them to be a dedicated athlete — is it the team’s culture, the fame, the love of the game, or the victories that keep the players on the court? For Durant, we can only speculate.As we all now know, the user experience is key. Understanding the sensory value of a user’s experience is essential in order to replicate it. What is making your user smile or say, “wow, this is so cool” when they’re locked in your story in virtual reality? Knowing what led to the smile, or any emotion, is essential in optimizing the way users get to the “wow!” moment.So let’s recap. It’s important to remember that:There is no industry without analytics: for VR to become a viable industry, we need data and we need to make data-driven decisions.Attention is currency: with our ever multi-tasking society, learning how and on what users spend their time tells us what is most important to them.There is a “what” behind the “wow:” knowing what specifically is driving the reactions of people experiencing VR will drive the industry to new heights and ultimately monetize a guideless industry.Look out for part two as we dive deeper into the world of virtual reality analytics and most importantly how this industry will be monetized.This article is part of our Virtual Reality series. You can download a high-resolution version of the landscape featuring 431 companies here. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Tags:#AR#Augmented Reality#featured#Internet of Things#IoT#Samsung#top#virtual reality#VR Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…center_img Related Posts Follow the Puck Clara Moskowitzlast_img read more

22 days agoBelgium goalkeeper coach Lemmens urges Real Madrid to rethink Courtois treatment

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Belgium goalkeeper coach Lemmens urges Real Madrid to rethink Courtois treatmentby Carlos Volcano22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBelgium goalkeeper coach Erwin Lemmens has urged Real Madrid to rethink their management of Thibaut Courtois.Courtois was substituted at half-time in Tuesday’s 2-2 Champions League draw against Club Brugge, with Madrid 2-0 down at the time.The 27-year-old was arguably at fault for Emmanuel Bonaventure Dennis’ ninth-minute opener and was again beaten by the Brugge striker later in the half.Comparing his compatriot’s woes at the Santiago Bernabeu to David de Gea’s form slump with Manchester United, Lemmens told Radio MARCA: “They have to treat him differently.”He’s a special boy and it’s unusual that he’s always at the highest level with Belgium, but there he suffers with De Gea syndrome.”If the Bernabeu whistles then you have to look at the team as a whole.”He’s a great goalkeeper and he’ll try to make Real Madrid happy again.” last_img read more

Lemieux plays outstanding role for Buckeye field hockey in Ohio return

Ohio State field hockey junior goalkeeper Sarah Lemieux.Credit: Courtesy of OSU Athletic DepartmentSarah Lemieux never thought she would get another chance to play field hockey after having to transfer back home prior to her third year of college.Lemieux, a Columbus native, was forced to leave Division II Indiana University of Pennsylvania and come back to Dublin, Ohio, to be with her family. She never expected she would be lucky enough to wear her goalkeeper gear again, let alone be part of the Ohio State field hockey team.“I had to come home for like financial, like family issues,” Lemieux said. “I didn’t even think I was going to get to play at all anymore.”However, Lemieux’s passion for the game never faltered, and when she heard OSU needed a goalkeeper, she decided to reach out to the coaches.“I didn’t even think I was going to get to play at all anymore and then I heard they needed a goalie, so I was like, ‘I guess I will email them,’ and I did, and they were like, ‘oh my God, like we really need a goalie,’” Lemieux said.The junior was a big part of the team during her time at IUP, but was not sure what her playing time would look like when she came to Columbus. She felt confident in her knowledge of the sport, but was shocked to see how much of a difference just one division made.“I was a starter. I played every game,” Lemieux said. “I had game experience, but it’s a completely different game. Like, it’s a lot quicker, like skill level’s a lot higher, so it’s different but it’s cool.”Coach Anne Wilkinson said Lemieux is a “very mature player” and has already made huge contributions this season.“She came in with some experience,” Wilkinson said. “She is confident, but she’s not over confident and I think she really plays an outstanding role on this team.”When OSU upset then-No. 20 ranked New Hampshire in its second game of the season, Lemieux claimed the Big Ten Player of the Week award in what was her first career start. The game went into double overtime, ending in a shootout. Lemieux denied UNH three times to preserve the victory.So far this season, Lemieux has tallied 28 saves, and Wilkinson said she has great talent as a goalkeeper and understands what is happening when the ball is coming her way.“She can come out so well on the ball,” Wilkinson said. “Her timing is really very good, and she reads the play. She anticipates well, she can handle a scramble, she can handle a lot of people in front of her, in front of the net, she can get down and she can stay focused on the ball. She is able to fight and if she can get to it, she will.”Wilkinson credits her goalkeeper’s strong mindset as a main proponent of her ability to keep her composure, even when things get rough.“She is just so even-keel,” Wilkinson said. “Whether she has a bad game or a good game, I just think she is mentally very strong.”Lemieux not only helps her teammates, but she has a passion for helping children as well. In the past, she has been a nanny to children and enjoys being part of their lives. She still keeps in contact with them and loves when she sees them in the stands at every home game.Lemieux said she was also a nanny for two children with autism a few years ago and babysits a child who has Down syndrome regularly. Her work with children is something she looks to continue after she finishes at OSU.“I am actually going into physical therapy to work with kids with special needs,” Lemieux said. “It was either occupational therapy or physical therapy. I don’t really know yet, but basically just working on everyday tasks in general with special needs kids is something I’ve always been interested in.”While Lemieux loves to spend her time with children, she also enjoys the time she has spent with her teammates at OSU. She said the team’s enthusiasm about the game is great and fun to be around.“Here it’s like everyone (gives) 100 percent like all the time and it’s a lot of fun to play with,” she said.Lemieux and the Buckeyes head to East Lansing, Mich., Saturday to take on Michigan State. Game time is scheduled for 1 p.m. read more