Guide to Internet law for non-profits

first_img Howard Lake | 31 October 2002 | News American publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc has published “The Nonprofits’ Guide to Internet Communications Law” by Bruce H Hopkins.The book is the latest addition to the legal section of the UK Fundraising Bookshop. The book addresses the issues faced by American non-profits. Sadly, there is no similar title for UK charities.Hopkins acknowledges that “there is almost no specific, existing law on which to base a practice.” He therefore extrapolates from existing law and applies it to the Internet. In particular he examines the administration of charitable giving programmes, fundraising, lobbying, political campaign activities, and related and unrelated business activities. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  16 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis “The Nonprofits’ Guide to Internet Communications Law” is available from Amazon.co.uk for £33.50. Guide to Internet law for non-profits About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Service, not sales: Build member loyalty with social media

first_imgTestimonials – Let users respond positively in a natural way. Don’t post testimonials yourself. That looks like you are tooting your own horn. Remember, it’s as if you are speaking to a member directly. You wouldn’t approach a member in a branch and say “John Smith loves his credit card at Acme CU!”Content Tip #3: Contests and giveawaysWhat keeps followers most engaged is the prospect of winning prizes. Here are some items that members love to win:Tickets to local sports team gamesTickets to concertsTickets to local amusement parks or the State FairGift cards – to local retailers or even credit union gift cardsKid prize packs – candy and toys and fun learning itemsFree lunch at local restaurantsContent Tip #4: Thank/express appreciation to your members – At least once a quarter.“Wishing all of our fantastic members a great Thanksgiving holiday!”“A big thank you to our members! You make our credit union great!”Content Tip #5: Community eventsCredit unions are invested in the prosperity of the community and your members know/appreciate that. Consider posts promoting local events and people. (This will also garner appreciation from the event planners/publications who may be more inclined to return the favor in the future.)Local teams – Ex. “The Mavericks are playing tonight at 7. Go Mavs!”Local festivals – Ex. “Taste of Addison begins tonight. Yum!”Interesting/inspiring local news – Ex: “Local elementary school student raises $1 million for cancer research. Great job, Charlie!”Content Tip #6: Let subject matter experts assist you in writing post/blog content.As wise as you are, you can’t be an expert on every topic. Get some tips from the investment expert at the credit union or a mortgage officer who can give you information for first-time homebuyers, etc.Turning a Complaint into a ComplimentWhile most of your interactions will be positive, every company participating in social media receives complaints. This comes with the territory. Don’t view this as a negative thing and, unless the post contains derogatory language, do not remove the complaint. Your followers will look to see how you respond. If you remove it, you’ll seem like you’re avoiding the problem and being dishonest. If you address it properly, not only can you satisfy the complainant, you can also send a great message to the public about how well you respond to member concerns.First, assess the complaint:Is it an issue that should be resolved by a member service representative?For example, is it regarding the member’s account, a loan, poor service in a branch, etc? If yes, politely respond to the member’s comment with something like:“We apologize for the inconvenience, Mr. Smith. We want to get this resolved as soon as possible. I have notified our VP of Member Service and she will be contacting you shortly.”Take a screenshot of the member’s post and forward it to your appointed member service representative. Make sure that they contact the member ASAP.Is the member making the complaint on a more anonymous social media site like Twitter?Provide the member with the direct phone number of the member service representative and respond to their post with something like:“We want to get this resolved for you ASAP. A member service representative has been notified and is waiting for your call at XXX.XXX.XXXX.” Is it an issue that cannot be resolved by a member service representative and is just a comment?For example: “Your branches are too far away. You should build one closer to my house.”If so, you can respond with something like:“We love to get feedback. Thank you! I will forward this on to our executive team.” Keep a log of these statements to provide periodically to the executive team.If the complaint uses inappropriate language, you are justified in removing the post; however, keep a screenshot of it and forward it to your member service representative to address.If you wish, you can respond to the person privately, letting them know that you are addressing their concerns but asking them to refrain from harsh language.By sticking to this social media plan, you’ll be building loyalty and trust. Members who trust and appreciate their financial institution are more likely to: 1) remain a customer for a longer period of time, 2) have more products and services, and 3) refer friends and family to your business. So, while you may not be directly selling your products and services on social media, you’ll be benefiting from your social media efforts in the long-term.TAKE-AWAYSApproach social media from a PR perspective, not a Marketing perspective. Inform and engage your members. Don’t sell to them.Only post content that is relevant to your members, not what’s relevant to the CU internally.Don’t delete negative comments. Let the member know you want to help and try to resolve his/her issue.Providing value to your members builds loyalty. Loyalty is important to the CU’s bottom line.Contributing author: Erin Ortiz 41SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jeff Kjoller Jeff has extensive experience in branding, art direction and graphic design, having served employers and clients in a creative capacity for more than twenty-five years. After graduating from the University … Web: www.loudthought.biz Details As a credit union, it’s your mission to serve as a financial resource for your members. Every day you provide guidance and tools that help your members live better, more secure financial lives. Your social media efforts should be a natural extension of this mission.The following tips will help you turn your social media accounts into a more valuable resource for your members…and keep them coming back.Posting the Right ContentSocial media users don’t want to be sold to. They use social media sites for entertainment, communication and interaction, not to read ads about mortgage loans. Think of your social media program as a PR tool, rather than a marketing channel. Instead of selling to your members, interact with them and provide useful information to help them make smart decisions.Content Tip #1: Subtly promote your products/services by posting information that is helpful/informative, but also related to a product/service you offer. Credit Union Goal: Promoting car loansRecommended Post: A link to an article on “The Most Fuel Efficient Cars of 2016”Purpose: Providing useful info while indirectly reminding them you offer car loansContent Tip #2: Only post credit union information that is relevant to your members: Relevant to Members:New branch openingsHoliday hours/closingsEvents – Annual Meeting, charitable events, fundraisersNew services being added – Inform, don’t advertise! Example: “For your convenience, Acme CU now has mobile deposit.”Not relevant to members: Employee changes/promotions/anniversaries, etc. Fans/followers don’t care that you got a new Director of IT.Industry information – Making one post about International Credit Union Day is fine, but don’t start posting updates on credit union legislation. This topic is only relevant to people in the industry. 99.9% of members don’t care.last_img read more

Why is credit union patching so difficult? Does it need to be?

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Banking and business software must continuously stay up-to-date to protect the safety of credit unions and their members. Many major breaches seem to start with a simple problem – lousy patching.  So, does credit union patching need to be so difficult? Is there anything your credit union can do to make patching your systems easier?  Ongoing Operations has several insights on helping credit unions with their patching requirements.We’ve all been there: you get into work in the morning, you’ve had your coffee, (hopefully) your breakfast and, miraculously, found your favorite parking spot. Other people are smiling, the sun is out, and it’s a pleasant 70 degrees. Things are looking up. You settle into your desk, and it’s time to be productive. You turn on the computer and… there’s an update.Finally, after the update and subsequent restart, it’s time to get going. You open the browser and… there’s an update. And there’s a patch to download on the primary office software as well. For some reason, there’s a new version of everything and, even worse, half require restarts. By the time you’ve updated and patched everything you need to update and patch, your spirit is broken, the coffee’s wearing off, and lunchtime is fast approaching.last_img read more

Cannabis use increases risk of psychotic cases

first_imgThe Australian 7 October 2019Family First Comment: The evidence is building, yet even Australian politicians want to put their head in the sand…The review of medical literature also examined Australian research, which concluded that regular cannabis users doubled their risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms — including schizophrenia — and were at an increased risk of screening positively for psychosis. “The evidence base regarding adverse health effects linked to cannabis use has broadened considerably since the gradual decriminalisation, and in some cases legalisation, of the substance in certain international jurisdictions,” the department says. “Adverse health outcomes as a result of regular cannabis use are not limited to mental health and psychotic symptoms.”Regular use of cannabis doubles the risk of psychotic symptoms ¬including schizophrenia and is closely associated with anxiety disorders, depression and -psychosis, says official advice to the Morrison government triggered by the passage of new laws in the ACT.The briefing paper prepared for Health Minister Greg Hunt reveals extensive links between cannabis use and adverse mental health affects, which have “broadened considerably” as marijuana is decriminalised.In the three-page brief obtained by The Weekend Australian, the Health Department lists five “key issues” or research findings to consider after the ACT Legislative Assembly passed a ¬private member’s bill allowing adults to possess 50gm of cannabis and grow two plants. Individual households can have up to four plants.The department notes there has been a sizeable body of work analysing the adverse physio¬logical and mental health effects of recreational cannabis use, des¬pite marijuana being decriminalised only in a small ¬number of jurisdictions.It points to research from the US state of Colorado that found daily or near-daily cannabis use was associated with the development of a psychotic disorder.The review of medical literature also examined Australian research, which concluded that regular cannabis users doubled their risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms — including schizophrenia — and were at an increased risk of screening positively for psychosis.“The evidence base regarding adverse health effects linked to cannabis use has broadened considerably since the gradual decriminalisation, and in some cases legalisation, of the substance in certain international jurisdictions,” the department says.“Adverse health outcomes as a result of regular cannabis use are not limited to mental health and psychotic symptoms.”The department advised that a 2018 Canadian Medical Association Journal report found an overwhelming volume of evidence outlining the biological harm of cannabis use, including brain changes, adverse cognitive outcomes, negative pregnancy outcomes and testicular cancer.The briefing also says a psycho¬active component in cannabis called tetrahydrocannabinol, the main chemical responsible for the drug’s psychological effects, increased by almost 30 per cent throughout the late 1990s and early 2000s.This was linked to exacerbated symptoms of anxiety, depression and psychotic symptoms in “naive” users and increased psychotic symptoms and dependence in “experienced” users.In Colorado, the first US state to legalise marijuana, emergency department visits due to cannabis increased slightly while the acute effects of THC — including hallucinations, paranoia and delusional beliefs — markedly increased with higher doses.Government sources said the departmental advice was a “devastating confirmation” of the health and mental health effects of recreational cannabis and urged ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr to explain what health advice he received before supporting the legislation.The federal government also wanted to know whether the territory government was aware of any studies that contradicted the broad global evidence of real and significant mental health effects from cannabis use.Mr Hunt said he was “deeply concerned about the very real risks cannabis can pose to physical health and, in particular, to mental health”. “This is why cannabis is a highly regulated drug,” he said. “Legalising recreational cannabis is dangerous and medically irresponsible.”https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/cannabis-use-increases-risk-of-psychotic-cases/news-story/c95979450145c9a346e56c9a3192a7b0  (behind paywall)Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Fergie not thinking about director role

first_img Press Association Speaking to the wider media ahead of Saturday’s Barclays Premier League encounter with Norwich at Old Trafford, Ferguson expanded on his theories, arguing that the Red Devils are working towards what he believes is the “brilliant” Bayern Munich model by installing Sir Bobby Charlton as a director and a number of former players – including Peter Schmeichel, Andy Cole and Gary Neville – as ambassadors. “That’s a long time away (being a director at the club), I hope,” he said. “The role Bobby Charlton has played at the club has been fantastic. “He has been a tremendous support to the manager and a lot of the players. “I think Bayern Munich is the perfect model. “It’s no problem having a replica of that for this club who have had so many great players over the years and who are now ambassadors now like Andy Cole, Bryan Robson, Peter Schmeichel. “There are quite a few of them here now and that’s a role we should be using as well.” Sir Alex Ferguson hopes any move onto the Manchester United board is a long way off.center_img In an extensive interview with the new twentyfour7 magazine, Ferguson outlined his plan for the future. “There’s no getting rid of me. I will probably become a director,” he said. “Nobody knows. Neither do I. It won’t be a doctor that tells me to quit.” last_img read more