Caltech Animation Based on Satellite Data Shows Southern California “Breathing” Water

first_imgScience and Technology Caltech Animation Based on Satellite Data Shows Southern California “Breathing” Water Ground rises and falls as water is pumped in and out of reservoirs—as measured in a study that could impact how municipalities manage this crucial resource By ROBERT PERKINS Published on Thursday, August 9, 2018 | 12:10 pm Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy More Cool Stuff Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Make a comment Community Newscenter_img Top of the News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News Credit: Bryan Riel and Mark SimonsUsing an unprecedented number of satellite radar images, geophysicists at Caltech have tracked how the ground in Southern California rises and falls as groundwater is pumped in and out of aquifers beneath the surface.Their findings are presented in a study that tracks deformation of the earth’s surface over an 18-year period. The work can be used by water management districts to assess the precise shape and size of aquifers and the impact of the region’s water use on those aquifers. The work also reveals what could be a previously unmapped fault running across northeast Orange County.“What we see through the rising and falling of the ground surface is the elastic response of the land to regular changes in groundwater level,” says lead author Bryan Riel (MS ’14, PhD ’17), who was a graduate student in the lab of Caltech’s Mark Simons at the time of the research, and is now a signal analysis engineer at JPL, which is managed by Caltech for NASA. “Because we have data over a long period of time, we were also able to isolate long-term surface deformation signals, including subsidence of the land that seems to be caused by compaction of clay layers in response to background variations in groundwater withdrawal.” Riel and Simons were also able to see sharp features where water was not flowing, which can indicate boundaries of aquifers as well as faults.The study, which was published online on April 30 by the journal Water Resources Research, uses publicly available radar data captured between 1992 and 2011 by European Space Agency satellites. The satellite data was compiled into 881 radar interferograms—images created by bouncing radar signals off of the earth’s surface—to track nearly vertical ground motion down to the millimeter with a horizontal resolution of tens of meters, over an area that stretches from San Fernando, northwest of downtown Los Angeles, down to Irvine, in Orange County.When all of the images are stitched together, they show the ground beneath Southern California rising and falling annually, like a giant breathing in and out. The results were checked against GPS measurements taken by the Orange County Water District (OCWD) and the Water Replenishment District of Southern California, which corroborated the findings. The periodic rising and falling of the ground tells the story of the management of Southern California’s aquifers and how that management has changed over time, says Simons, the John W. and Herberta M. Miles Professor of Geophysics at Caltech and JPL chief scientist.“At the beginning of the study period, we see big sinusoids—higher highs and lower lows. Toward the later half of the study, that flattens out a bit, indicating that water control districts were more actively managing aquifers, and making sure to put water back into them instead of just taking it out,” Simons says.Roy Herndon, chief hydrogeologist for the OCWD, says that his team works to make sure that the ground never sinks too far—a development from which it might never recover.“We suspect that the geology of our basin might allow subsidence to occur if we allowed too much groundwater to be pumped out but never refilled it. We have clays and silts that can compress and compact with time,” Herndon says.That strategy is codified in the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA), signed into law by California Governor Jerry Brown in 2014, which dictates that groundwater managers need to avoid permanent lowering of the ground level. The phenomenon has plagued the San Joaquin Valley of Central California for generations. Soil compaction driven by a shrinking water table has caused the ground in the area to subside by as much as 28 feet, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Herndon says that the study by Riel, Simons, and co-authors—and other surveys like it—will help water districts make sure that their water management strategies are effective at avoiding such soil compaction in California.While the rising and falling of the ground was to be expected, the radar data also showed some unexpected features, Simons says, including a sharp boundary at the edge of an aquifer, which could indicate a buried fault along the eastern edge of a basin where the Santa Ana River passes through the Santa Ana/Garden Grove area. In addition, the map revealed a small area with anomalously large ground level uplift that turned out to be caused by petroleum operations pumping oil out and water in.Riel, Simons, and co-authors relied upon data from ESA satellites. Meanwhile, JPL, NASA, and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) are planning to launch a new radar satellite called NISAR in early 2022 that will provide observations from two directions every 12 days—providing higher-quality, higher-resolution data than have previously been available.“With that kind of data, we’ll be able to paint an even clearer picture that could reveal even more about the ground beneath our feet,” Simons says.The study is titled “Quantifying Ground Deformation in the Los Angeles and Santa Ana Coastal Basins Due to Groundwater Withdrawal.” Other co-authors include Daniel Ponti of the USGS; JPL’s Piyush Agram, who is a visiting associate at Caltech; and Romain Jolivet of the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France. Support for this research came from NASA. 4 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Herbeauty10 Special Massage Techniques That Will Make You Return For MoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWomen Love These Great Tips To Making Your Teeth Look WhiterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeauty Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday last_img read more

Listen To Joe Russo, Marco Benevento, & Oteil Burbridge Debut RB&B At Peach [Full Set Audio]

first_imgLast weekend, the Peach Music Festival introduced an exciting new supergroup dubbed RB&B, featuring Joe Russo, Marco Benevento, and Oteil Burbridge. The group was among many last-minute set additions that were tapped to replace Gregg Allman in his headlining sets. The Peach Music Festival Turns Into Weekend Tribute To Gregg Allman [Gallery]With basically no lead time, the impromptu group stuck to space-heavy jazz and grooves, showcasing the drummer, keyboardist, and bassist’s impressive abilities to improvise with one another. The three intrinsically molded together, leaving fans immediately wanting more out of the new group. Thanks to Ted Gakidis, you can listen to the soundboard mix from the truly phenomenal set below:You can also catch Joe Russo and Oteil Burbridge at Brooklyn Comes Alive on October 22 alongside members of The String Cheese Incident, The Disco Biscuits, Lettuce, Soulive, Medeski Martin & Wood, Snarky Puppy, Primus, RatDog, Dopapod, and so many more. With over 50 artists, spread across 3 venues, all in one day, this year’s BCA is not to be missed. [Get tickets here][H/T JamBase]last_img read more

Tokyo Olympics will go ahead ‘with or without COVID’ : IOC’s Coates

first_img“The Games were going to be, their theme, the Reconstruction Games after the devastation of the tsunami,” he added, referring to a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami in northeastern Japan in 2011.”Now very much these will be the Games that conquered COVID, the light at the end of the tunnel.”In an historic decision, the 2020 Olympics were postponed because of the global march of the pandemic and they are now set to open on July 23, 2021.But Japan’s borders are still largely closed to foreign visitors and a vaccine is months or even years away, feeding speculation about whether the Games are feasible at all. Tokyo’s postponed Olympics will go ahead next year regardless of the coronavirus pandemic, IOC vice president John Coates told AFP Monday, saying they would be the “Games that conquered COVID”.The Olympics have never been cancelled outside of the world wars and Coates, speaking in a phone interview, was adamant that the Tokyo Games will start on their revised date.”It will take place with or without COVID. The Games will start on July 23 next year,” said Coates, who heads the International Olympic Committee’s Coordination Commission for the Tokyo Games. Japanese officials have made clear they would not delay the Games a second time beyond 2021.A recent poll found just one in four people in Japan want them to go ahead next year, with most backing either another postponement or a cancellation. ‘Monumental task’ Coates said the Japanese government “haven’t dropped the baton at all” following the postponement, despite the “monumental task” of putting the event back a year.”Before COVID, [IOC president] Thomas Bach said this is the best prepared Games we’ve ever seen, the venues were almost all finished, they are now finished, the village is amazing, all the transport arrangements, everything is fine,” he said.”Now it’s been postponed by one year, that’s presented a monumental task in terms of re-securing all the venues… something like 43 hotels we had to get out of those contracts and re-negotiate for a year later.”Sponsorships had to be extended a year, broadcast rights.”With much of that work underway, or accomplished, a task force has been set up to look at the different scenarios in 2021 — from how border controls will affect the movement of athletes and officials, to whether fans can pack venues.The group, comprising Japanese and IOC officials, met for the first time last week.”Their job now is to look at all the different counter-measures that will be required for the Games to take place,” said Coates, the long-time president of the Australian Olympic Committee.”Some countries will have it [COVID] under control, some won’t. We’ll have athletes therefore coming from places where it’s under control and some where it is not.”There’s 206 teams… so there’s a massive task being undertaken on the Japanese side.” Topics :last_img read more

Freshman Sykes breaks out with dominant all-around performance to lead Syracuse to win over Loyola

first_imgBrittney Sykes was energized from the get-go.Less than a minute into the game, she stole the ball and raced downcourt. She swiveled her body and found a wide-open Cornelia Fondren in the right corner.Fondren drained the 3-pointer and got Syracuse on the board.“My personal style is that I like to gamble and go for steals – easy buckets,” Sykes said. “Usually after a steal the energy picks up.”It certainly did.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse burst out to a 10-point lead in the first nine minutes, as Sykes sparked the Orange right away.The freshman’s afternoon was just getting started, though, as she played her most complete game this season and bullied Loyola early and often. Sykes filled up the stat sheet Saturday in Syracuse’s (9-1) 83-48 victory over Loyola (Md.) (4-6) in the Carrier Dome in front of 417 fans. She finished with 15 points, five steals, five rebounds and three assists, igniting SU to the blowout victory.“As long as she’s aggressive and she can get some things in transition going to the rim I think everything else opens up,” Syracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman said.And it did.Syracuse was in a slump midway through the first half. After building an early lead, the Orange let Loyola claw back into the game. Consecutive 3s by Nicole Krusen and Alyssa Sutherland cut Syracuse’s lead to 16-14 with 7:38 remaining in the half.Less than two minutes later, Sykes stole an errant pass from Sutherland and raced down to the other end. She bulldozed her way to the basket and laid the ball up and in, drawing a foul in the process.She swished the free throw, pushing SU up five.Then Sykes got a hand in the passing lane yet again. She came away with the ball and flew downcourt, as Loyola defenders frantically tried to stop her. She missed the layup, but Kayla Alexander cleaned up what Sykes had started.After a jumper by Loyola’s Diana Logan, Sykes spotted up in the corner, waiting patiently for a pass. She stood in the same spot where Fondren drained a 3 to start the game.This time, Sykes took Fondren’s pass. She squared her body toward the basket and connected from deep, putting Syracuse up 24-16 with 4:38 to go in the first half.“She’s a very athletic player that can really slash to the basket,” Hillsman said. “Her shooting keeps people honest. That’s one thing that we talked about.”In the second half, Sykes didn’t skip a beat. She forced another steal and converted on a putback off a missed hook by Alexander, as the Orange’s lead started to balloon with the score 36-20.Sykes was the sparkplug for Syracuse, as the Orange took it to Loyola in the second half and ended up shooting almost 56 percent in the half and dropping 51 points.Hillsman said it was Sykes’ best game so far this season. She struggled over the past three games, scoring only nine total points on 3-of-14 shooting.Saturday that all changed in a hurry. Sykes sped Loyola up and flustered the slower Greyhounds.She forced five steals and ignited multiple fast breaks.Sykes said it was tough not to get down on herself during the inconsistent stretch coming into the game, but she said her teammates were supportive and told her to keep her head up.“My confidence level is so high right now all thanks to my teammates, honestly,” Sykes said. “I’ve been down on myself from scoring and how to score, but they’ve been keeping me positive.”Hillsman said Sykes was efficient in all aspects of the game Saturday. Despite her recent struggles, Hillsman knows he can expect many dominant games from Sykes down the road.“It’s tough having such a dominant player because you want the finished product now, but the finished product might not be in two or three years,” Hillsman said. “She had a very, very good game tonight.”Carmen Tyson-Thomas said Sykes is stepping into her role as a scorer and defender for Syracuse. She cheered from the bench and alongside Sykes on the court as the freshman forced turnovers, snatched rebounds and drilled 3-pointers.“I’m proud of her,” Tyson-Thomas said. “I was in the same position as a freshman to come in and have to score. It’s a big role to take on, and I’m glad she’s stepping into it.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 8, 2012 at 5:46 pm Contact Trevor: [email protected] | @TrevorHasslast_img read more

Sydney O’Hara blasts NCAA-record 4 home runs; Syracuse splits doubleheader at North Carolina State

first_imgSydney O’Hara’s four home runs led Syracuse (13-7, 1-1 Atlantic Coast) to an 11-5 win over North Carolina State (7-16, 1-1) in the second game of a doubleheader Friday afternoon in Raleigh. SU lost the first game, 3-0.O’Hara, out of the three-hole, blasted four home runs for eight RBIs, accounting for more than two-thirds of Syracuse runs. O’Hara is the first player in Syracuse history with four home runs in a single game, bumping her season total to five and her RBI total to 24.O’Hara is the only player in the NCAA this season with four home runs, tying an NCAA record. The four hits push O’Hara into first place on the team with a batting average of .484 and second in the ACC in home runs (five).N.C. State shut out the Orange in game one of the doubleheader. Alexa Romero took her third loss of the season, giving up two home runs to the Wolfpack. Syracuse managed only five hits in this game. Peyton Silverman struck out three in the complete game shutout.SU continues its first series of ACC play on Saturday afternoon against N.C. State. First pitch is slated for 2 p.m.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 10, 2017 at 8:51 pm Contact Matt: [email protected]last_img read more