Former biology prof. dies at 92

first_imgJulian Pleasants, associate professor emeritus of biological sciences at Notre Dame, died Sept. 17 at the age of 92, according to a University press release. Pleasants graduated from Notre Dame in 1939 and began working at LOBUND, the University’s germ-free research center, in 1944, according to the press release issued Thursday. He earned his doctorate in microbiology from Notre Dame in 1966, and worked in germ-free research for the rest of his career. In addition to his work teaching and researching at Notre Dame, Pleasants worked throughout his life as a Catholic social activist and peace activist. He joined the Catholic Worker movement at the end of the Great Depression. In 1941, he helped create South Bend’s first Catholic Worker house of hospitality to serve meals made from Notre Dame’s dining hall leftovers to unemployed men. As a member of the Catholic Worker movement he joined a community of Catholic social activists, which included Catholic writer and editor Eugene Geissler and Notre Dame professor Willis Nutting. He began to correspond with his future wife, Mary Jane Brady, when she was editor of “Life and Home” magazine. They married in 1948. In 1949, Pleasants, his wife and other members of the Notre Dame theology program, in which he studied for a master’s degree, purchased an 80-acre farm in Granger to live in a communal, religious setting and work closely with the land. He and his wife raised seven children in that community. The Pleasants were also founding members of Little Flower Catholic Church. Pleasants, his family and other members of the community sought to integrate faith, Catholic liturgy, social justice and the importance of life into their lifestyles. He was a volunteer at South Bend’s Logan Center and a founding member of Friends of l’Arche, both of which serve the developmentally disabled. Pleasants died at the Sanctuary at Holy Cross. He is survived by three daughters, four sons and 17 grandchildren. There will be a visitation today from 5 to 7 p.m. and a Mass of Christian Burial Saturday, both at Little Flower Catholic Church on 54191 Ironwood Rd. Contributions in Pleasants’ memory can be made to the Logan Center or Little Flower Catholic Church.last_img read more

Virus puts globalized economy at risk, says OECD chief economist

first_imgTopics : There are some signs that companies are already giving greater consideration to the issue, though it’s too soon to say there will be knee-jerk reactions to the virus. Last week, France’s Sanofi said its plan to create a standalone company to make key ingredients for other drugmakers will help ensure supplies of essential components and reduce reliance on Asia.Boone was briefing journalists on the OECD’s economic outlook, in which the Paris-based organization slashed its 2020 growth forecast because of the shockwaves the epidemic is sending across the globe. The deeper links between economies that have come with globalization mean that the virus impact is unprecedented.“The global economy has become substantially more interconnected, and China plays a far greater role in global output,” the OECD said in the report. “Even if the peak of the outbreak proves short-lived, with a gradual recovery in output and demand over the next few months, it will still exert a substantial drag on global growth in 2020.”The OECD is not the first to raise the point. The longer-term lessons also came up at a meeting of Group of 20 finance chiefs in February, with some officials warning of the risks of depending largely on complex supply chains in strategic and sensitive sectors.“We clearly see that we are too dependent on supply from foreign countries and China,” French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said Monday on France 2 television. “We will review all our industrial supply chains to see how we can re-localize business in most strategic areas and be sovereign and independent.” The upheaval from the coronavirus outbreak may be the final jolt that the world’s biggest companies need to reevaluate how they operate in a globalized economy, the OECD’s chief economist Laurence Boone said.The sprawling, continent-crossing supply chains of corporations have already come under pressure from trade tensions and climate concerns, and may face further stress as countries change global taxation rules. If and when the dust settles from the coronavirus, Boone said firms will likely pause to reconsider what they do.“What characterizes what we have seen over the past decade is effectively real-time management of stocks and very integrated supply chains,” Boone said Monday. “In the same way that central banks can review their monetary policy framework, I think businesses after this outbreak will likely look at how they are managing their stock, how they are organizing their production throughout the world.”last_img read more