Nutrient losses from burning of corn residues

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest There have been a number of combine fires reported around the state this fall, which can easily turn into larger fires in the dry fields.When corn residue burns, how much nitrogen (N) just went up in smoke? N is volatilized and lost when plant material burns.Phosphorus and K remain and return to the ground with ash. However, P and K could be lost if ash is blown away from the field during or after the fire. Fire damage in a field is usually variable in scale. Not all material is completely turned to ash, and rarely is the entire field burned (from one end to another). Understanding what was burned and how much area was affected has an impact on the total amount of N lost. The amount of N contained in corn residue has been well documented from the late 60s and clearly delineated by John Sawyer at Iowa State (http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/icm/2000/10-23-2000/dryfallfires.html). To estimate how much N was lost, the grain yield level for the previous year must be considered. The harvest index (in corn, the ratio of grain weight to total plant dry weight) is another piece of information that must be known (if unknown — assume 0.5).  Providing a relatively accurate measure of the area affected is obviously important. Additionally, recognizing the residue remaining and adjusting the material burned can provide a more quantitative measure of the actual damage (if this is unknown assume 100%). The table below provides a simple estimate of N lost based on the previous year’s corn yield (assuming a harvest index of 0.5 and yield adjusted to 15.5% moisture). Remember, the N contained within the corn residue would not have been released and made plant available for next season’s crop. Yield  (bu/A) N  lost  (lb/A)12040 130 44 140 47 150 50 160 54 170 57 180 60 190 64 200 67Along with the loss of N, carbon contained in the plant material is lost as well.  It would have been incorporated into the soil organic fraction. This too has value. While there is no specific dollar amount tied directly to a loss of organic matter, an Iowa State University article recommends that one dollar per acre should be claimed. Unfortunately, the economic impact associated with the loss of residue cannot be fully realized until later, especially in fields with high erosion potential.last_img read more

Zach Profit, Nov 12

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We have had some freezing temperatures. It got cold enough that we could run all night after we started back up on Saturday. We had enough wind that it is starting to dry off again. We have been happy to get some days to run.We finished soybeans and we are 72% done with corn. We hope we can finish in the next week. If you get outside of Van Wert County, there is still quite a bit of corn out in the fields.Corn yields have been pretty strong. We will be better than last year, but not by much. This year will probably be the best corn we’ve raised and the best beans we have raised. We are pleased.The moisture in the corn increased. It seems like we picked up a point of two of moisture. It bottomed out around 17% and I doubt it will get dryer than that. The yields are still good and quality has been good. There has been talk of vomitoxin here and there. There is nothing major or widespread, but the elevators are testing for it and apparently they have had it in hog houses. When the pigs sense the vomitoxin, they scoop the bad feed out of their feeder and put it in a pile until they find the good stuff. They started testing and found some loads with elevated levels. It sounds like it is really bad in Canada where they are even leaving corn stand in the fields because they don’t know what to do with it.As a whole farm average I am hoping to see around 210. Most of the average yields we have seen are from 200 to 230. We have not had much under 200 bushels. Storage wise I think we can hold what we have left.There is really not a ton of field work done around here. If you didn’t get in during that window there before Halloween, you haven’t done much since then. This is about the first window in the last couple of weeks. Not a lot of spraying was done either. It will be interesting to see what kind of messes we have in the spring. I have only seen one sprayer out this entire fall. We haven’t done any. I think most guys have already winterized their sprayers.It looks like a lot will get done with harvest this week. I still think most guys around there will finish up before they did last year.last_img read more

Utica FFA visits Ohio Legislative Leadership Conference 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Front Row, L-R: Abby Paxton, Amanda Annett. Back Row, L-R: Hadley Ramirez, Emily Hill, Amanda AnnettBy Abigail Paxton Utica FFA Reporter 2019-2020On September 25, some of the Utica FFA Chapter officers took a trip to the Ohio Legislative Leadership Conference or OLLC. The 5 officers that went were; Rachel Dickson(President), Emily Hill(Vice President), Amanda Annett(Treasurer), Hadley Ramirez-George(Secretary), and Abby Paxton(Reporter). The officers traveled to the Ohio State House for the Conference.Throughout the Conference, the officers  learned and did several actives on leadership during the day. During the first session, the officers learned about lobbyist and representatives. They learned what they are, what they do, and how anyone can do it. Then, they did an activity on the two topics. All the FFA members that went were divided into 22 groups, 11 were lobbyist trying to get a certain chosen topic changed by law and the other 11 were representatives, half of the groups were republican and half were democratic. The lobbyist would go around to the representative groups and try and get the law changed on their topic. Based on the representatives view in the folder, the groups would answer on what they would do to the law. Either they would choose to change it or keep it the same.After all the groups went around they reflected on the pros and challenges of the activity. The activity taught everybody respect, leadership, and showed that anyone can have an option and try to change it. After the first session was dismissed, the officers had a chance to explore the State house before the luncheon. The explored the Senate Chambers and learned new facts about the building. During the luncheon, many people representatives of Ohio FFA and the Ohio Senate spoke.  The team learned a lot from everything they did and had an amazing time!last_img read more