Villas-Boas airs Chelsea regret and Germany plans

first_imgAndre Villas-Boas admits “England was bad for me”, but the former Chelsea and Tottenham manager is planning a return to coaching in Germany.Having followed in the footsteps of mentor Jose Mourinho at Porto to forge a reputation as one of the finest young bosses in world football, the Portuguese took the reins at Stamford Bridge at just 33 years of age.He would last only nine months in that post before taking on another Premier League challenge across London at White Hart Lane. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! Villas-Boas fared a little better with Spurs, making it through one full season before being moved on, but left English football aware that he had made several mistakes.He told those in attendance at the WebSummit in Lisbon: “England was bad for me, I was not flexible in my ideas. “I learned to be more flexible when I went from Chelsea to Tottenham. I always thought more in the long run without thinking in the short term. “I was thinking about the future, but the results were irregular.”Villas-Boas has since spent time in the dugout at Zenit St Petersburg and Shanghai SIPG, with the most recent of those spells coming to a close in November 2017.Andre Villas BoasHe has moved into motor sport since then, taking part in the Dakar Rally, but still sees football forming part of his future – potentially in the Bundesliga, with Goal having revealed how he has previously been considered by Borussia Dortmund.“I’m learning German now, it’s a market that pleases me and I need to know the language,” he added.Villas-Boas will be well prepared for any challenge he takes on, but he believes there is still a lot more that football could learn from other sports when it comes to preparing players for elite competition.He said: “It does not happen in the US, the NBA or the NFL. The players spend eight hours in the centres. “It was important to do the same in football – training in the morning, controlling nutrition, analysing opponents, for example.” Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

Epic Greek Battle: Nick Kyrgios Edges Stefanos Tsitsipas in DC

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Greek-Australian Nick Kyrgios hammed it up by delivering a repaired sneaker to his opponent, No. 1-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas. He celebrated one key shot with a shimmy. He marked the last point by shaking a fan’s hand.The Nick Kyrgios Experience was in full effect at the Citi Open on Saturday night — and he played quite well, too, hitting 19 aces, saving a match point and edging Tsitsipas 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (7) in a semifinal about as even as can be and filled with all manner of memorable moments across its 2 hours, 7 minutes.How close was it? Each man took a total of 91 points. Each won 48 of his 58 first-serve points; each won 16 of his 33 second-serve points; each won 27 return points.“Nick, in my opinion, is underrated. I guess the rivalry between me and him — it looks bright,” Greek star Tsitsipas said. “I’m pretty sure we’re going to face each other plenty of times in the future.”Stefanos Tsitsipas, of Greece, returns the ball to Nick Kyrgios, of Australia, during a semifinal at the Citi Open tennis tournament, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)Said Kyrgios: “He fully deserved to win, as well.”The 52nd-ranked Kyrgios will seek his sixth ATP title Sunday, when he faces No. 3 seed Daniil Medvedev in the final.Medvedev advanced with a 6-2, 6-2 victory over Peter Gojowczyk. That match was a snoozer compared with Kyrgios vs. Tsitsipas, which featured fantastic shotmaking by two creative players in their early 20s.The most GIF-worthy interlude came during a changeover early in the third set, when the shoe issues that have been plaguing Tsitsipas cropped up again, creating a comical scene.Tsitsipas says friction from the way he slides on hard courts leads to problems with his sneakers’ laces, which is why he has been changing footwear during matches. That bothered his quarterfinal foe, Benoit Paire, so much that Paire went and yanked off a shoe himself in a sort of protest.This time, a ball boy brought a problematic shoe to Tsitsipas’ father — who is also his coach — up in the stands for fixing. Kyrgios leaned on a screen at the back of the court, then decided to help things along by getting that sneaker from Dad and carrying it across the court to Tsitsipas. Kyrgios presented it on bended knee, with head bowed, as if to say, “Here, my lord.”Kyrgios smiled. Tsitsipas gave him a thumbs-up. Spectators reveled in it all.“I just wanted to speed the process up,” Kyrgios said later, adding: “By the way, Adidas sucks.”That’s when a tour PR person ended Kyrgios’ news conference.Kyrgios and Tsitsipas never had faced each other and, in the past, they’ve had their differences. But the duo played doubles together in Washington this week and apparently hit it off.Nick Kyrgios, left, of Australia, carries a bag containing a pair of shoes to Stefanos Tsitsipas, of Greece, during a break in play in a semifinal at the Citi Open tennis tournament, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)The concluding tiebreaker was a roller-coaster. Kyrgios led 5-1. Tsitsipas, who had his right thigh taped by a trainer after skidding to an awkward stop in the opening game, seized five consecutive points to lead 6-5 and hold a match point. Kyrgios erased that with a 132 mph service winner.On Kyrgios’ first match point of his own, at 7-6, he flubbed a slice forehand. Before the second, he spoke to a front-row spectator, as though seeking advice, closed out the victory with a big serve followed by a forehand winner, then raced back to shake the man’s hand.Kyrgios is most definitely a showman, someone who does the sorts of things few, if any, other tennis players do, for better or for worse.“Some people love him. Some people hate him. I believe we need people like him in the game,” Tsitsipas said. “Otherwise, everything becomes too serious. He’s fun.”Nick Kyrgios, bottom right, of Australia, celebrates with a spectator in the stands after defeating Stefanos Tsitsipas, of Greece, in a semifinal at the Citi Open tennis tournament, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)Earlier, American teens Coco Gauff and Caty McNally won their first pro tournament as a doubles team by beating the fourth-seeded duo of Maria Sanchez and Fanny Stollar 6-2, 6-2.“For both of us,” Gauff said, “it means a lot.”McNally’s impressive showing in Washington included a run to the semifinals in singles — but that’s where it ended in that event Saturday with a 7-6 (5), 6-2 loss to Camila Giorgi of Italy.In Sunday’s final, Giorgi will face Jessica Pegula, whose parents own the NFL’s Bills and NHL’s Sabres.___By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis WriterTweetPinShare2323 Shareslast_img read more