Novice and Pee Wee Grizzlies play first games of the season

first_imgVANDERHOOF, B.C. – Four of the Fort St. John Grizzlies Minor Lacrosse teams were in Vanderhoof this past weekend for their first road trip of the season.The Tyke Grizzlies played a pair of exhibition games against the host community, while the Midget team held a zone practice with other teams from across Northern B.C. Fort St. John Minor Lacrosse Association President Annika Hedican says that the Midget teams across Northern B.C. will be splitting up the players from Vanderhoof, as they don’t have enough players to field a team this season. The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab – Advertisement -The Grizzlies’ Novice and Pee Wee teams were also in action, and played their first league games of the season against teams from Mackenzie, Prince George, and Vanderhoof. The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Samantha Lucas The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Samantha Lucas The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Samantha Lucas The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Samantha Lucas The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Samantha Lucas The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Samantha Lucas The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Samantha Lucas The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Samantha Lucas The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Novice lacrosse team in their game against the PG Posse. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Fort St. John Tykes lacrosse team. Photo by Crystal Raab The Novice team went 0-2 over the weekend. Ethan Bilodeau had a pair of goals on Saturday afternoon against the host team, while Chaz Lucas had another goal and Kayden Raab tallied an assist in the team’s 8-3 loss. On Sunday, the Novice Grizzlies faced another tough opponent, the Prince George Posse. Bilodeau had a hat-trick, with Raab assisting on Bilodeau’s first of the game. Tiegan Chenier also scored unassisted but it wasn’t enough as the Grizzlies fell to the Posse 11-4. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Mackenzie. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Mackenzie. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Mackenzie. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Mackenzie. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Mackenzie. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Mackenzie. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in action against Mackenzie. File photo The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in action against Mackenzie. File photo The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Vanderhoof. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Vanderhoof. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Vanderhoof. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Vanderhoof. Photo by Kerrie Ferris. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Vanderhoof. Photo by Sam Lucas. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Vanderhoof. Photo by Sam Lucas. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Vanderhoof. Photo by Sam Lucas. The Fort St. John Pee Wee lacrosse team in their game against Vanderhoof. Photo by Sam Lucas. The Pee Wee Grizzlies played back-to-back games on Saturday afternoon. In their first game against Mackenzie, the team came out flying. Ian Johnson got things started for Fort St. John in the opening seconds with an unassisted goal, his first of five in the game. Gavin Adams scored a hattrick and added an assist. Both Carson Davis and Griffen McCue had two-goal games, with McCue also tallying an assist. Max Banack, Colton Bowler, Tyler Donald, and Chance Glazier all scored a goal each, with Banack, Bowler, and Glazier also getting helpers in a 16-3 rout of Mackenzie.The Grizzlies came right back out on the floor a couple hours later for their second game of the afternoon against Vanderhoof. Unfortunately, Fort St. John didn’t quite have the legs. Adams scored the Grizzlies’ lone goal in the second period, and Fort St. John fell to Vanderhoof 7-1.Advertisementlast_img read more

PICTURES: MOVING CEREMONY AT OILEÁN NA MARBH

first_imgIT’S called Oileán na Marbh – island of the dead – and but for local man Seamus Boyle perhaps its history would have been lost forever.The small rocky outcrop near Carrickfin was where stillborn babies banned from consecrated ground by the Church for centuries were buried.On Sunday afternoon more than 200 people gathered at the beach overlooking the island before descending for a brief prayer service. Amongst them was Kathleen Hannon whose great-aunt is buried there. “It’s a very sad place,” she said. “But it is also now a peaceful place now that it is recognised.”Pilgrims then left the island of the angels and walked back to the beach, crossing a rising tide as they went.And on shore a touching service took place led by Father Michael Herrity and Church of Ireland representative Margaret Boyd.Mr Boyle had first heard about babies being buried on the island more than 50 years ago whilst out fishing with his uncle. Three years ago he decided with others to do something to mark the past by erecting a cross and stone there.This was the third year in a row that people have gathered to remember those 500 babies which are thought to be buried there.Said Seamus: “It is an uplifting occasion now. I wanted people to know about this place before it was lost to the next generation.”PICTURES: MOVING CEREMONY AT OILEÁN NA MARBH was last modified: August 14th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:carrickfindonegaloileán na marbhlast_img read more

DONEGAL WOMAN CHRISTENS TWINS AND THEN SAYS ‘I DO’!

first_imgKaren with new husband Geroid after their whirlwind day!It wasn’t quite ‘Four weddings and a funeral’ but Donegal woman Karen Simmons and new husband Geroid Dunne certainly know how to pack a lot into one day.With three children under the age of two years, the devoted young couple didn’t know when they would find the time to walk down the aisle.So when they were having their two month old twins Leah and Conor christened, they decided now was as good a time as any. But even more surprising was the fact that none of their family or friends knew about their big announcement.Karen, an office administrator from Listillion outside Letterkenny, said the only other person in on their secret was the priest Fr Martin Jennings.“We decided that the vast majority of people we would want at our wedding including our families and close friends were there anyway.“We didn’t want to put them to any additional expense or fuss so we decided we would have our wedding ceremony after the christening,” revealed Karen. The mum of three, who now lives in Tubbercurry, Co Sligo with Geroid, two year old daughter Grace and new twins, said the reaction of the 50 or so friends and family was priceless.“Fr Jennings was in on the secret and he knew we were getting married for the right reasons.“When he announced after the christenings that there was another small ceremony – our wedding – people went very quiet. I think they were in shock. But then everyone cheered and it was just perfect,” said Karen, 34.The couple had booked a photographer for the christening and so were able to get some wedding photos also.The christening and wedding guests then had a meal to round off what was a wonderful if not somewhat surprising day. The couple first met four years ago in Calgary, Canada where both were working and playing for the Calgary Chieftains GAA Club.They moved back to Ireland but never found the time to tie the knot.“We were both lucky in that we found work and although we had travelled a lot, we are delighted to have moved back to Ireland,” said Karen.She said the only disappointment was that some family members could not make their wedding ceremony but the couple plan to have a big party and make sure everyone is invited. “My brother was one person who couldn’t make the christening because he was sick but we couldn’t stop the wedding ceremony.“We’re going to have a big party and everyone will be invited,” added Karen.Karen is the daughter of Joe and Anne Simmons from Stranorlar.DONEGAL WOMAN CHRISTENS TWINS AND THEN SAYS ‘I DO’! was last modified: January 7th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:christeningdonegalGeroid DunneKaren Simmonssligotwinslast_img read more

American military deaths near 2,000 in Iraq war

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week The latest deaths reported by the military: A Marine was killed Friday in an explosion near Haqlaniyah. A soldier died Thursday of a non-hostile gunshot wound in Baghdad. Two Marines were killed Friday by a roadside bomb near Amiriyah, 25 miles west of Baghdad. The latest identifications reported by the military: Marine Staff Sgt. Richard T. Pummill, 27, Cincinnati; killed Thursday near Nasser Wa Salaam, by an explosion; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C. Marine Lance Cpl. Andrew D. Russoli, 21, Greensboro, N.C.; killed Thursday near Nasser Wa Salaam, by an explosion; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C. Marine Lance Cpl. Steven W. Szwydek, 20, Warfordsburg, Pa.; killed Thursday near Nasser Wa Salaam, by an explosion; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C. – Associated Press160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! As of Saturday, at least 1,996 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003, according to an Associated Press count. At least 1,547 died as a result of hostile action, according to the military’s numbers. The figures include five military civilians. The AP count is 13 higher than the Defense Department’s tally, last updated at 10 a.m. EDT Friday. The British military has reported 97 deaths; Italy, 27; Ukraine, 18; Poland, 17; Bulgaria, 13; Spain, 11; Slovakia, three; Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Netherlands, Thailand, two each; Hungary, Kazakhstan, Latvia one death each. Since May 1, 2003, when President Bush declared that major combat operations in Iraq had ended, 1,857 U.S. military members have died, according to AP’s count. That includes at least 1,438 deaths resulting from hostile action, according to the military’s numbers. last_img read more

THE K2 LIVE BLOG: DAY 3 – LISTEN TO JASON BLACK’S LATEST MESSAGE

first_imgJason Black in TibetAudio Playerhttps://www.donegaldaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/msg-2-copy.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Mountaineer Jason Black has received great news after receiving his climb permit to climb K2. In his daily live blog for Donegal Daily, Jason gives his last report. Simply click on the arrow to hear his latest report.THE K2 LIVE BLOG: DAY 3 – LISTEN TO JASON BLACK’S LATEST MESSAGE was last modified: June 25th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Day 3Jason Blacklive bloglast_img read more

Met Éireann ‘closely monitoring’ Hurricane Lorenzo as it races toward Ireland

first_imgMet Éireann says that it will continue to monitor Hurricane Lorenzo, which is currently over the south Atlantic Ocean.According to RTE, the National Hurricane Centre, Lorenzo has strengthened to a category 5 hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 155m/ph.It says that it is the strongest hurricane on record this far north and east in the Atlantic basin. Met Éireann says Hurricane Lorenzo is expected to gradually head northeastwards in the direction of Ireland, however, the exact track and severity once it comes closer is still uncertain.The storm is expected to lose its major status soon.Met Éireann ‘closely monitoring’ Hurricane Lorenzo as it races toward Ireland was last modified: September 29th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:weatherlast_img read more

Model ‘green’ car in South Africa for World Cup

first_imgXavier van Stappen is inside his car. Van Stappen and Vincent Pierart. The car’s solar panel. Van Stappen at the media briefing in Pretoria. (Images: Bongani Nkosi) MEDIA CONTACTS • Xavier van Stappen I-care info@icare-green.eu  RELATED ARTICLES • Going green for 2010• World’s first hybrid sports car in SA • Mercedes-Benz SA tops for quality • Beetle mania grips World CupBongani NkosiXavier van Stappen’s rather unconventional model electrical car, which he designed and drove from Europe to Africa before the 2010 Fifa World Cup, is helping raise awareness about alternative forms of energy and environmentally harmful carbon emissions.The French Belgian, who designed the three-wheel prototype in his home country, crossed 25 countries in Europe and Africa to get to the host nation, South Africa, in time for kick-off on 11 June.He set off in Copenhagen, in Denmark, and drove for four months to reach Ghana, just days before the tournament began. He then promptly disassembled the vehicle and flew with it to South Africa.“We flew from Ghana to South Africa just to be on time for the World Cup,” Van Stappen said at a press briefing in Pretoria on 7 July.During his overland trip he crossed Belgium, The Netherlands, France, Spain, Morocco, Senegal, Burkina Faso and Mauritania, among others.Travel by road began again in Johannesburg when Van Stappen started his next leg of the journey – this time to Cape Town. The inventor has been travelling with Vincent Pierart, who’s been filming the expedition for a website.The two-seater vehicle, which Van Stappen always describes as a prototype, is essentially a modified tricycle that’s shaped like a bullet. It relies solely on solar energy to move and can reach speeds of 110km/hour. “But I never drive so fast,” he quipped.It has a 10-year lifespan and is recyclable, according to Van Stappen.Van Stappen’s 12 000km journey to South Africa, which he planned to coincide with the World Cup, is promoting the use of “green” technology to create energy and contributing to the global campaign against biodegradation.“Nowadays we have a problem with petrol. It’s expensive and it produces pollution,” he said.Using only the sun’s rays to power the vehicle means that it makes no carbon emissions at all. “We have to adopt new ways of producing energy,” Van Stappen said.He believes that all electrical cars should be three-wheelers, because this keeps them light. Today’s conventional cars “are over-equipped” and consume a lot of energy, he said. Making electrical cars with four wheels defeats the objective of lightness, he adds.Although the first electrical car was manufactured in 1899, the market remains small. Van Stappen believes mass production will boost the industry and create more options for buyers. “[Consumers] are ready to buy it in many countries … [they] have the power to buy whatever they want.“During my trip I’ve met many people who are interested in the project.”Promoting the technology in AfricaVan Stappen’s prototype has been exhibited in all 25 countries it passed through, and is currently on show at the Allandale Business Park in Midrand, Johannesburg.One of the vehicle’s overriding characteristics is its very basic chassis, which Van Stappen disjointed with students at a technical college in Dakar, Senegal, to demonstrate its simplicity. Because the design is so uncomplicated, the students were later able to rejoin the chassis themselves.“The aim [of the trip] is also to transfer the technology” to the Southern Hemisphere, Van Stappen said.His prototype has even made it onto a football pitch at one of the World Cup stadiums.‘Green’ car for SA soonDuring his stay here Van Stappen visited a private company in Cape Town, Optimal Energy, which is producing South Africa’s first electrical car, the Joule. He said he was impressed by what he saw.Production will begin in 2012, either at a plant in Coega or East London – both industrial areas in the Eastern Cape province . The company hopes to have the vehicle ready for sale by 2013.“It’s great that [South Africa] is a country that’s producing an electrical car for its local market,” Van Stappen said.The Joule will be a standard four-wheel, five-seater vehicle with a top speed of 135km/h. It will use rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are also recyclable.The South African model will be able to run on solar power as well, so one of the optional extras is to have solar panels installed on its rooftop.The first of its kind in the country, the Joule was designed by South African-born Keith Helfet, who’s had a successful career as chief stylist at Jaguar.When not driving or promoting his first three-wheel prototype, Van Stappen works on a second three-wheel car project, the I-CARE 333, which is also biodegradable. He’s hoping that, in time, it will be available on markets across the world.During his stay in South Africa the Belgian designer visited Volkswagen’s plant in the Eastern Cape, and is now is looking for deals to manufacture I-CARE 333 here.last_img read more

Foster builds a network of support

first_imgAs a young woman finding her own way, Lesley Ann Foster started Masimanyane Women’s Rights International that enabled her to grow personally as she helped others. Masimanyane Women’s Rights International executive director, Lesley Ann Foster, is on a mission to end violence against women. (Image: African Feminist Forum)Yvonne FontynOn her first day at what was to become the Masimanyane Women’s Rights International, executive director Lesley Ann Foster says she sat in the empty building and said, “Now what?” She finally had the means to start a shelter to help the many desperate women she had come across in her work with a charity for street children, but she didn’t know where to start.Her benefactor, businessman Reggie Naidoo, who had offered her his premises, told her: “Phone all the women you know; they will tell you what to do.” The women came, to help and to be trained as counsellors. “A friend who worked for Powa [People Opposing Women Abuse] came and 22 women were trained on how to counsel rape survivors,” she said on the phone from her headquarters in East London, on the beautiful Eastern Cape coastline.That was 20 years ago. Today Masimanyane, funded partly by overseas donors and the Department of Social Development, employs 42 full-time staff, with 20 volunteers giving their time on a regular basis. Its 11 centres in Eastern Cape offer medical and legal services and 24-hour counselling, and Masimanyane collaborates with other organisations in South Africa such as the Nisaa Institute for Women’s Development, based in Lenasia, in southern Johannesburg. International presenceFoster herself is a speaker on world platforms – in 2010, together with NGOs from the nine provinces, she compiled a nationwide report for the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, and presented the report the following year in Geneva, Switzerland.Working with Norwegian Church Aid, Foster has been instrumental in helping Iraqi women achieve their democratic rights, and in 2012 she took a group of South African activists to the United Nations’ General Assembly after she was invited to address delegates on the global increase in violence against women. She sits on the boards of several international organisations, including Amanitare, the African Partnership for the Sexual and Reproductive Rights of Women and Girls, which has members in 26 countries.Working with women is what gets her up in the morning, says Foster. “I love working with women. What I am doing, I am passionate about… I am focused on bringing women from one point to another.”About the first women she was able to assist at Masimanyane, she says: “I felt attached to them, and to the outcome, but I realised my role was to be a facilitator – to link them with opportunities, then let them take it and run with it.”She loves nothing better than to hear that someone who had approached the centre had achieved her goal – like the woman who had no matric, could not speak English and lived in a rural area but wanted to become a social worker. She heard Foster speak on the radio and plucked up the courage to approach the University of Cape Town, which agreed to help her to do the course. “Now she is doing her honours.”Setting a goal and slowly, step-by-step, achieving it is something to which Foster can relate. She was living with a violent partner and was harassed at work for being a whistle-blower when she had her “Aha” moment and realised where her purpose in life lay. Helping street childrenHer foray into the non-profit sector began when she returned to her home town of East London to spend time with her ailing father. “I had been offered a management position – it was a step up for me,” she says. “But the minute I arrived I felt something tugging at my heart – a feeling that there was something else to do.” At her church she heard about Daily Bread, a street children project, and soon she was helping with fund-raising and running its resource centre, collecting goods and distributing them to needy people. “I trained as a child care giver and was able to open 20 soup kitchens. From the funds we raised we were able to buy farms to house the children. In the seven years I was there we helped about 400 children. Those boys are young men now. I still have contact with them – I am granny to their children.”Things went sour when a colleague told her she had found that funds had been misappropriated. Foster investigated, found evidence and took legal counsel from Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR). At this point her employers began to threaten her. On one particularly difficult day she escaped her office to LHR across the road and as she was talking to the counsellor “she said to me, you are working for disempowered people but here you are, disempowered,” Foster recalls. Aha moment“I had my ‘Aha’ moment,” says Foster. “I left the charity. But I fought the case to the end. I was harassed, I was stalked but I see it as a growing experience now because I gained strength within myself.”Her mother, now 81 and still a committed community worker, advised her against pursuing the case. “I told her I was prepared to die for what I believed in. Once I had admitted to myself what the dangers were, I could go out fearlessly.”It was at that stage that she decided to help women. “During my work with street children I encountered women with huge problems – they were enduring terrible abuse and violence, the children also. But there was no help for them. Lifeline worked in the white community but there were no shelters or counselling services for the black community.“I was 32 and finding my own path – and I have always been of the mind that when I have an experience, I apply it to help other people.”The desire to set up a resource to help the women from her community was born, but help did not come easily. Organisations such as the Black Sash did not have the means, she says, but “Ntombazana Botha of LHR helped, and she is the reason is I started Masimanyane”. Another friend, Mala Naidoo, mentioned that an overseas church had been training South African women as counsellors.It was at that stage that Reggie Naidoo, who ran Ibec, a business to help marginalised entrepreneurs, offered Foster a double-storey house in which to start her centre. After the initial outreach efforts, she was able to fill the house gradually but surely as women arrived – referred by LHR and churches, and coming to train as volunteers.“The name came from the women,” says Foster, looking back on 18 years of active service. “Masimanyane means ‘Let’s support each other’. The organisation’s growth was organic, it was democratic – and we have kept to that in the 18 years.” Counsellor trainingThe first training done with Lifeline, a free phone counselling service, was “traumatic and powerful”, she says. “It was a meeting of different cultures, races and languages – we had interpreters. The fear the black women had of the white women…” It was clear there was a lot of work to be done. At the same time, she says, some psychologists in the city were sceptical: “They did not believe that victims could help each other. But we needed women to stand up.”Foster has made it her business not only to help disempowered women at a practical level, but also to try to change the structures that underpin the inequalities in society. During the first weeks of the centre’s operation she documented the women who had been referred to Masimanyane by LHR. “There was no help for them.” She put a call through to the then minister of justice, Dullah Omar, who happened to be the friend of an uncle. “He sent Vusi Pikoli [then director-general]. He sat with me, discussing what to do. Manto Tshabalala-Msimang was deputy justice minister – she came too.“We organised for a petition to demand more services for women. Seven months later we launched Masimanyane – Dullah Omar was the main speaker. It was the right time – 1995 – the time of the transition to a democracy.”Foster was invited to join a committee drawing up the new Domestic Violence Act. Turning pointIn 1996, she went to the International Conference on Violence, Abuse and Women’s Citizenship in Brighton, in England – “a turning point”, she says. “I was mesmerised, learning about rape and other issues of violence against women in a global context.” Then came an invitation to attend talks on women’s leadership at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, in the United States. This is where she said she became aware of “women’s human rights. It changed my understanding.” It was exciting for this woman from South Africa to attend Rutgers’ Center for Women’s Global Leadership to undergo training with delegates from all over the world, she said. “It was amazing and it changed my organisation.”While in Brighton, Foster had connected with a Norwegian NGO, the Norwegian Crisis Shelter Movement, which became Masimanyane’s first international partner. “This gave us a global view and platform. We continued to develop those links.” Foster also sits on the board of International Women’s Rights Action Watch, which is active in 122 countries.Yet, despite these measures and those put in place by various governments, discrimination against women and violence against women are growing worldwide. Speaking last year on International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, Louise Arbour, the United Nations’ High Commissioner for Human Rights, said that to stem the increase of violence against women and girls, those committing the crimes must be prosecuted. “Most perpetrators of these crimes [enjoy] impunity,” she said.“This impunity is built on a foundation of discrimination and inequality… Unless these inequalities are addressed, including in the economic and social spheres, the violence will persist.”Foster concurs and says the reason for the violence remains that “women are not valued in society as much as men are. This discrimination fosters inequality and the inequality is expressed by some men as violence against women and girls. Patriarchy allows men to experience privilege in every area of their lives and the downside of this is that women are accorded a status lower than that of men.”But she is not dispirited: “South Africa offers much hope and inspiration for women. Yes, we do have high levels of violence against women but we also have powerful programmes to protect women and to advance their human rights. We need to work on implementation of the existing laws and programmes. I have seen young women enter professions that have been closed to them. Our affirmative action programmes are amazing in putting women into leadership positions. There is much to celebrate and be proud of.”Trends and developments offer hope, she says: “The work which is being done to eliminate violence against women in the country is powerful. It has drawn diverse groups of women together and they work on the issue collectively.”It is not just in homes that changes are being made: “I am particularly proud of what Masimanyane Women’s Support Centre has achieved in getting women engaged with their local and provincial governments,” says Foster. “We have worked on strengthening state accountability and this is brilliant because the impact reaches all women in the country.”last_img read more

Preparing for winter with pastured poultry

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Producers who raise pastured poultry and want to maintain egg production this winter should keep their birds as warm and dry as possible, according to experts from the Purdue University College of Agriculture.A good first step is to provide indoor accommodations for the flock.“Producers should insulate housing, provide heat, make sure water is kept unfrozen and keep hens inside on extremely cold days to avoid frostbitten combs and wattles,” said Patricia Hester, professor of animal sciences.Providing shelter has a number of benefits, said Delaware County Extension educator Michael O’Donnell, a pastured poultry producer.“The most important thing for laying birds when it’s cold out is to have an area where the birds can get out of the elements so they can get to dry bedding, be able to roost up and not have a draft running through their area,” he said.A small coop, shed or barn are housing options that allow birds to get out of the elements and provide space for them to move around, Hester said. According to the Humane Farm Animal Care poultry housing standards, exits to the outdoors should be placed every 50 feet in large barns and should be 18 inches high and 21 inches wide. These exits may also provide ventilation, but if condensation appears on coop windows, additional airflow is required.Perches are also recommended to keep birds comfortable. Shelters should be kept above single-digit temperatures to avoid frostbite. To minimize the risk of accidental fires, producers should pay close attention to indoor heaters.O’Donnell recommended using straw, wood chips or wood shavings as indoor bedding. Sand, dirt and mulch are good materials for a dust bath, which birds need to keep clean and limit pest infestations.Poultry also need access to water at all times because they are constantly breathing out moisture, using it in egg production or passing it through waste. If the coop temperature dips below freezing but stays above single-digit temperatures, it may be necessary to heat drinking water using a base heater or an electric heater that can sit inside a water dish. O’Donnell advises checking the water often to ensure it does not run out, spill over or become contaminated.Producers may also need to provide more feed for their poultry because birds use more energy in winter to regulate their body temperatures. If the birds don’t have enough to eat, they might lack the energy needed to produce strong eggs and maintain good health. That is why feeders should be kept filled.“Laying hens eat more feed in cold weather,” Hester said. “When they are outside, they have access to roughage in the field. When they are inside, they tend to eat more feed and less roughage due to lack of availability.”It is also important to make sure the birds get enough of the calcium they need to produce strong egg shells. One solution is to provide them with a diet that includes crushed oyster shells.O’Donnell said laying hens may not produce as many eggs as daylight dwindles.“Laying cycles can be triggered by light exposure, so a light source on a timer may be helpful in that case — you can have a light turn on before the sun is up to mimic a longer day,” he said.For more information on poultry management practices, call the Indiana State Poultry Association at 765-494-8517, or visit their website: http://www.inpoultry.com/.last_img read more

Zach Profit, Nov 12

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We have had some freezing temperatures. It got cold enough that we could run all night after we started back up on Saturday. We had enough wind that it is starting to dry off again. We have been happy to get some days to run.We finished soybeans and we are 72% done with corn. We hope we can finish in the next week. If you get outside of Van Wert County, there is still quite a bit of corn out in the fields.Corn yields have been pretty strong. We will be better than last year, but not by much. This year will probably be the best corn we’ve raised and the best beans we have raised. We are pleased.The moisture in the corn increased. It seems like we picked up a point of two of moisture. It bottomed out around 17% and I doubt it will get dryer than that. The yields are still good and quality has been good. There has been talk of vomitoxin here and there. There is nothing major or widespread, but the elevators are testing for it and apparently they have had it in hog houses. When the pigs sense the vomitoxin, they scoop the bad feed out of their feeder and put it in a pile until they find the good stuff. They started testing and found some loads with elevated levels. It sounds like it is really bad in Canada where they are even leaving corn stand in the fields because they don’t know what to do with it.As a whole farm average I am hoping to see around 210. Most of the average yields we have seen are from 200 to 230. We have not had much under 200 bushels. Storage wise I think we can hold what we have left.There is really not a ton of field work done around here. If you didn’t get in during that window there before Halloween, you haven’t done much since then. This is about the first window in the last couple of weeks. Not a lot of spraying was done either. It will be interesting to see what kind of messes we have in the spring. I have only seen one sprayer out this entire fall. We haven’t done any. I think most guys have already winterized their sprayers.It looks like a lot will get done with harvest this week. I still think most guys around there will finish up before they did last year.last_img read more