SolarPowered Salamander at Open House Weekend

first_imgNova Scotians will have a chance to see a yellow-spotted salamander that’s powered by the sun and to learn about the province’s gold mines, fossils, parks, forests, Crown land and more at the Department of Natural Resources Open House Weekend. The free, family-friendly event will be Saturday, June 1 and Sunday, June 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Shubenacadie Provincial Wildlife Park in Hants County. “The DNR Open House Weekend is a great opportunity to explore fascinating facts about our natural resources,” said Natural Resources Minister Charlie Parker. “Come visit and learn about wildfire fighting, ancient fossils, forestry, wildlife, biodiversity, hunting and fishing regulations and many other topics.” Visitors will enjoy more than 50 indoor displays and hands-on activities, including the unique salamander that thrives using photosynthesis as if it were a green plant. People can talk with helicopter pilots, biologists, foresters, geologists, natural resource technicians, fossil experts, land surveyors, conservation officers and other professionals with the department. It will also be an opportunity to learn about careers in these fields. “The open house will be a fun family event with lots of interesting displays and things to learn,” said Don Cameron, member of the department’s open house planning group. People will also get to experience animals at the wildlife park, walk the park’s nature trail, take a photo next to a helicopter, and enjoy food and drink that will be for sale. The Department of Natural Resources helps manage the province’s natural resources for all Nova Scotians through research, education, regulation, enforcement and outreach. The Open House Weekend is a time for people to learn more about the province’s natural resources and how the department’s programs help. The first open house, held on one day in 2009, drew more than 2,000 people. More information and directions to the open house are at www.novascotia.ca/natr/openhouse .last_img read more

WFFP concerned over fishermen deaths

In a statement issued from the WFFP Secretariat in Karachi, Shah appealed to President Mahinda Rajapaksa, DG, Metrological Department, Sri Lanka S.H. Kariyawasam, Mahinda Amaraweera, Minister of Disaster Management and the Sri Lankan Ambassador in Pakistan to launch an independent inquiry in to the incident and see if there is any negligence on the part of government officials. “It is a must to ensure an effective disaster risk information scheme with the responsibility of national interest and reactivate the established disaster information towers along the coast for an effective service,” the statement said.The WFP Secretary advised the Sri Lankan government to develop a workable plan with proper consultation of fisher groups and promote a subsidy system so the fishermen may purchase life jackets and other equipment they need on the fishing vessels. The WFFP Secretariat has written separate letters to the government of Srilanka, including to the President, disaster minister and other authorities urging them to compensate not only to the funerals and the final respects of the people, but to the affected vulnerable families, children in the families, for their education and other matters adequately. Secretary of the World Forum of Fisher People (WFFP), Mohammed Ali Shah has expressed concerns over the death of several fishermen in Sri Lanka.Shah, who is also chairperson of the Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum (PFF), on behalf of the communities in Pakistan expressed solidarity with the Sri Lankan fishermen. Shah also said to utilize the learning of tsunami rehabilitation programs to make an effective disaster mitigation program with wider participation of the society to avoid human loss in future.The WFFP official said the whole government should take the responsibility and be accountable, as nature is going to be alarmed due to climate change and fishermen are more vulnerable to face the devastation and pay the price of the government’s negligence, the statement said. read more