Repeat offender on armed robbery charge

first_imgA young man, who is presently before the Courts for three counts of armed robberies, was yet again remanded for a similar offence when he appeared before the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts on Friday.Remanded: Odinga HaywoodOdinga Haywood, 22, of Charlestown, stood before Senior Magistrate Leron Daly and denied that on May 29, 2019, at Charlestown, Georgetown, while being armed with a gun, he robbed Julius Hope of two cellular phones valued $96,000 and $10,000.Prosecutor Richard Harris did not present facts into the matter but objected to bail being granted on the basis that Haywood is a known character to the Police and is currently before the Courts on similar offences.As such, the unrepresented man was remanded to prison and the case will continue on August 23.Haywood was charged in 2016 for three counts of armed robbery. Only 20 years old then, the charge against him read that on February 21, at Waterloo Street, Georgetown, being armed with a knife, he robbed Trevor Singh of a Samsung Galaxy cellular phone valued $60,440, Ibrahim Takur of a Samsung Galaxy cellular phone valued $70,000 and Mohamed Takur of an iPhone and headset valued $122,000.He had pleaded not guilty to those charges. Meanwhile, earlier this year, Haywood was charged for possession of narcotics; however, after pleading guilty to the charge and begging the Court’s leniency, Haywood was given a second chance and ordered to perform two weeks of community service.last_img read more

World Cup transport plans in place

first_img24 May 2010South Africa’s transport plans for the 2010 Fifa World Cup™ are shaping up, the latest development being the appointment of a service provider to procure, operate and manage spectator transport for the mega-event.The Department of Transport has appointed the ESC & The African Experience consortium to manage inter-provincial and regional road transport services for both commuter buses and minibus taxis for spectators during the month-long tournament.Transport Minister Sibusiso Ndebele said he was confident that they would provide a professional service for spectators, as they already operate in the tourism industry.“The taxi industry is to provide a fleet of over 400 mid-buses to ferry spectators around the country, while 110 commuter buses from Autopax will complement these services,” Ndebele said.Fleet usage will be dependent on demand that is generated for the service and ticket sales. Inland and coastal services will also be on offer. The fleet of taxis and buses will be additional to existing transport services in the country.Countrywide servicesThere will be a service between Pretoria, OR Tambo International Airport and Johannesburg, as well as Rustenburg, Polokwane, Mbombela and Bloemfontein.On the coast there will be a service from Knysna to Cape Town via Wilderness, George, Mossel Bay and back. There will also be a service from Mossel Bay to Port Elizabeth via George and Wilderness and back.From East London, spectators will be able to travel to Port Elizabeth via King William’s Town and Grahamstown and back.Further up the coast, services will run between Richards Bay and Durban, the Wild Coast Sun and Durban, and between Pietermaritzburg and Durban.Prices will range from R140 to R300 for a one-way trip. The operational plan and final contract have been finalised for coaches and taxis, said the department.Taxi council supportMeanwhile, the South African National Taxi Council (Santaco) is working closely with the consortium to provide a countrywide Minibus solution for spectators.Operational staff will be clearly identifiable through coded arm bands and other branded clothing. “It is not just about sport, it is now truly about transport,” said Ndebele.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Mower maintenance tips to take care of this off season

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Be it out in the country or in the city, a well-cared-for yard is something everybody can take pride in. And with lawn care taking a break this time of year, and equipment taking up residence in shops and garages, the professionals of Koenig Equipment tell us it’s an exceptional time to be thinking about mower maintenance for the year ahead. Dave Oakley, lawn and turf specialist for Koenig’s Urbana location, takes a look at some of the commonly overlooked maintenance items, as well as professional service options.last_img

Ex-Minor Leaguers Sue Baseball

first_imgST. LOUIS — Like many young baseball players, Aaron Senne dreamed of fame and fortune when he signed his first contract as a Miami Marlins’ draft choice after a record-breaking college career at Missouri.Reality as a low-level minor leaguer was far different: vending machine dinners, bug-infested apartments and a paltry salary with an equivalent hourly wage less than what fast-food workers make.Senne and former minor league players in each of the 30 big league organizations are suing Major League Baseball, alleging violations of federal wage and overtime laws in a case some legal observers suggest has significant merit.They are seeking class-action status on behalf of the estimated 6,000 ballplayers who toil each summer in outposts stretching from Bluefield, Virginia, to Bakersfield, California, as well as an unspecified amount of back pay.“You come from high school or college where you’re not making anything and you just think, ‘I’m getting paid to play baseball. I’ll chase my dream,’” said Senne, who retired last year after having Tommy John surgery on his elbow in 2011, one year after the Marlins paid him a $25,000 signing bonus as a 10th round pick. “You get that first paycheck and you do a double take. It’s an eye opener.”In Senne’s case, that first check from the Jamestown (N.Y.) Jammers, a short-season Class A affiliate, was for $1,100 a month and $25 a day in meal money. At his peak, he earned $7,000 in 2012, but like all minor leaguers, wasn’t paid salary during spring training or for his offseason conditioning work.Federal antitrust exemptions have largely protected pro baseball from comparable legal challenges. But in this case, the 32 plaintiffs recruited by attorney Garrett Broshuis — another former minor leaguer from Mizzou who went to law school after six seasons in the San Francisco Giants’ organization — allege violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act, a 1938 law that stipulates a minimum wage for workers and requires overtime for most employees who work more than 40 hours weekly.The suit was filed earlier this year in federal court in San Francisco, though Major League Baseball wants to move the suit to Florida, where most of its teams spend spring training and courts are considered more employer-friendly.“Yes, these guys are chasing a dream,” said Broshuis, acknowledging that short-term sacrifices can become distant memories should a big league contract be attained, which carries the promise of a $500,000 minimum salary while on the 25-man major league roster or disabled list. “But it’s also a job. And it’s a job they put a lot of hours in.”Attorneys representing Major League Baseball in the California case did not respond to interview requests, and a spokesman in the league’s New York office declined comment.In a 78-page response to the suit, the league and Commissioner Bud Selig outlined 30 objections, including an exemption under the federal wage law for “seasonal, amusement or recreational” workers and a contractual requirement that workplace disputes must first go to arbitration before courts intervene.University of New Hampshire law professor Michael McCann, director of the school’s Sports and Entertainment Law Institute, notes that most minor league salaries fall far below the federal poverty level of $11,670 for a single person and $23,850 for a family of four. Nor do minor leaguers have the power of a union to advocate on their behalf.“Maybe for a 19- or 20-year-old, that’s all right,” McCann said of the typical minor-league contract. “For a guy who’s 28 years old with a family, I don’t see how there’s enough money to pay the bills.”He said the lawsuit makes a “credible argument,” but noted that MLB has yet to offer a detailed response.Broshuis attributed the disconnect between the idealized version of paying one’s dues in the minors and his actual experience as his primary motivation for pursuing a legal career.Drafted by the Giants in 2004 and out of baseball five years later after a few stints in Triple-A, he was valedictorian of his law school class at Saint Louis University.“Very early in my career, I realized that something just didn’t seem quite right,” he said. Compared to college, “it almost seemed like a step down in working conditions. It seemed backward.”Senne was one of three original plaintiffs in a case that is back in court later this week. He said the suit is a long-overdue challenge to a management mindset that embraced financial sacrifice as a necessary rite of passage.For players who voiced their concerns, the response from coaches and managers was uniform, he said. “They would say, ‘If you don’t like it, play better,’” Senne said. “‘Or go get a 9-to-5 job.’”(ALAN SCHER ZAGIER)___TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

10 months agoChelsea defender Luiz: Sarri philosophy produced Crystal Palace winner

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea defender Luiz: Sarri philosophy produced Crystal Palace winnerby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea defender David Luiz says N’Golo Kante’s winner at Crystal Palace came via manager Maurizio Sarri’s “philosophy”.The Brazil defender spotted Kante’s run and found him with a lofted pass, which the France midfielder chested down and shot left-footed under Palace goalkeeper Vicente Guaita.Luiz said, “It is never easy to play here or control it here especially when they play long balls but we did well.”We could have scored early but they also did a great match defensively which is why it was so difficult.”[The goal was about] the connection, about training every day and understanding the philosophy.”I just tried to put the ball in and time it for his run.” last_img read more

Air Canada adding more planes to Rouge for use on domestic routes

first_imgMONTREAL – Air Canada is looking to cut operating costs and defend against competition from upstart low-cost competitors by adding more planes to its Rouge fleet and flying them on regional routes within Canada.Narrow-body Rouge planes that operate at lower cost could replace smaller regional aircraft operated by airline partners like Jazz on some routes.For example, one of several flights per day on a popular route could be converted to an Airbus plane, industry analysts were told Friday.Rouge aircraft are also available to compete if necessary with ultra low-cost carriers like WestJet’s new Swoop subsidiary, Flair Airlines or Canada Jetlines.“We needed to have the capability of introducing a lower-cost competitive vehicle, both on offence and on defence,” Air Canada CEO Calin Rovinescu said during a conference call about its 2017 results.The increased use of Rouge planes domestically is permitted under changes to the collective agreement with pilots negotiated last year.Several more Rouge planes are being added this summer and once all Boeing 787s are delivered next year there will be no limit on the number or type of single-aisle planes that can be flown by Rouge.Ben Smith, president of passenger airlines at Air Canada, said Rouge Airbus A320s and 321s can be converted to high density single class cabins or possibly another airplane type such as the Boeing 737 Max.Rovinescu also told analysts that a joint venture with Air China expected to be concluded in the coming months would enable it to be more aggressive in the competitive Pacific market.The joint venture would expand the relationship beyond the use of lounges and codesharing as it faces pressures on flights to China and Hong Kong.“It certainly it should certainly be an assistance to us in competing more aggressively,” Rovinescu said.Meanwhile, Air Canada announced Friday a new $250-million cost-cutting plan to be implemented by the end of 2019. That follows the completion of a $500-million plan launched in 2009 that eventually netted about $575 million in savings.The new drive to cut costs comes as the Montreal-based airline looks to maintain margins despite the expected slowing down of its capacity growth with the arrival of its final new large planes.“We showed we can take costs out in bad times but we now need to show we can continue to have that cost discipline in good times,” Rovinescu told analysts.The cost savings are expected to come from procurement, maintenance, aircraft leases, internal engineering, overhead and simplified business processes, added chief financial officer Michael Rousseau.Chris Murray of AltaCorp Capital Inc. said the new drive for efficiency is important as Air Canada’s growth slows to about seven per cent in 2018 from nearly 12 per cent in 2017, with more reductions likely in subsequent years.He expects the savings to come from “behind the scenes stuff” that won’t be felt by passengers.Air Canada capped a strong 2017 by earning adjusted net income of $61 million, or 22 cents per share for the quarter — ahead of analyst estimates of 14 cents per share, according to Thomson Reuters data.The airline’s operating revenue was $3.82 billion in the fourth quarter, up from $3.43 billion a year earlier and above the estimate of $3.75 billion.Net income was $8 million or two cents per share for the three months ended Dec. 31, which was an improvement over a 2016 fourth-quarter loss of $179 million but lower than expected.“Overall, we liked what we saw in the Q4 results,” wrote analyst Walter Spracklin of RBC Dominion Securities in a note to clients.For the full year, it earned $2.04 billion or $7.34 per share, up from $876 million or $3.10 per share in 2016. Adjusted profits also rose five cents per share to $4.11.Revenue grew 10.7 per cent to $16.2 billion as the airline carried a record 48.1 million passengers, up 7.3 per cent from the prior year.This included record revenues from cargo and Air Canada Vacations along with more than $1 billion in ancillary revenues from payments for checked baggage, seats, food and changed bookings.Strong demand and growing connecting traffic through its three hubs in Canada are expected to result in another good year in 2018, said Rovinescu, who added the performance is under appreciated by investors.Air Canada’s shares grew nearly 90 per cent last year and were up 2.3 per cent at $24.88 in midday trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange.Follow @RossMarowits on Twitter.Companies in this story: (TSX:AC, TSX:WJA)last_img read more

Womens coworking space The Wing set to open first location in Canada

first_imgTORONTO – A co-working space for women that’s drawn the ardour of thousands of Instagrammers and the attention of celebs including Jennifer Lawrence and Lena Dunham is set to expand to Canada.The Wing, a New York-based networking and social club, said Tuesday that Toronto is among the six new locations joining its burgeoning pastel-hued chain.The female-focused company is part of a wave of modern sororities geared to female entrepreneurs, merging a fierce can-do motto with feminist ideals tailor-made for a generation of self-starters.It joins several other Canadian ventures that similarly put career women in their sightlines, including Toronto’s exclusive Verity Club and its luxury spa, the co-working and wellness space Shecosystem with its yoga classes and Madonna dance parties, and the pretty and perky penthouse space Make Lemonade. Other spaces include Montreal’s LORI hub, which stands for Ladies of Real Influence.“It’s important to have the space where we all feel comfortable and that this is ours, that we have ownership as well,” Rachel Kelly, Make Lemonade’s founder and owner, says of her inspiration.“If you start exploring a couple of the co-working spaces you’ll notice there is quite a male-dominated culture in a lot of these spaces and that presence is quite overpowering,” she adds.“Just the overall vibe — the bro vibe — is a big thing.”The Wing’s promotional material includes the taglines: “A home base for women on their way,” “Your throne away from home” and “Say goodbye to the old boys’ club.”It was founded by PR exec Audrey Gelman and business partner Lauren Kassan, and was inspired by the women’s social clubs of the early 20th century.It launched in Manhattan’s Flatiron district in October 2016, expanding to SoHo a year later. Then came a third spot in the DUMBO neighbourhood of Brooklyn in February, and a fourth heads to Washington D.C. this spring.All locations are created by an all-female design and architecture team and feature a menu of food, wine and cocktails created by female chefs, sommeliers and mixologists. There are also showers and lactation rooms.The Wing says its first Canadian outpost is slated to open in early 2019, the address yet to be determined.Other new locations include Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Williamsburg (Brooklyn), and London.There certainly appears to be demand in Canada for such a venture.Twenty-two-year-old entrepreneur Kim Kirton says she joined Make Lemonade after souring on more traditional co-working spaces.“Sometimes I would feel uncomfortable just working, just the way people would kind of look at me,” says Kirton, who too often found professional networking opportunities devolve into social pitches.“(Men were) just coming up and usually asking, ‘Oh, what are your plans today?’ or, ‘What are you doing after work?’ versus ‘Oh, what do you do for work?’”Kirton doesn’t suggest she’s experienced any misconduct, stressing that her concerns were primarily focused on finding the best place to run her online wardrobe business, UnCo.“I have a startup here in the city and I’m trying to be like every other entrepreneur and trying to grow my business.”Although none of the members are men, Kelly says they’re certainly welcome to join Make Lemonade, as long as they adhere to an “inclusivity mandate” that bans “sexist, racist, xenophobic, homophobic, transphobic, ableist, classist or otherwise discriminatory language.”Since launching last September, Kelly says she’s drawn 80 members in various fields including editing, food, publishing, law, fashion and tech. In addition to workspaces, she offers mentoring, workshops, and mixers.But some question whether women-targeted initiatives are the answer.Sarah Kaplan, director of the Institute for Gender + the Economy at the University of Toronto, worries they push women to the sidelines, instead of levelling the playing field.“I’m not a big fan, personally, of cloistered solutions,” she says.“I’m sure it will satisfy the needs of some people who feel like it’s just a more pleasant or safer or more conducive (place) to the kind of work that they want to do. But is this a huge market opportunity because women are so different from men? No. It’s just because the world of work is so gendered masculine that I think the only solution people can come up with is to cloister and I don’t think that’s the right solution.“I think we have to change the world of work. But that’s a bigger project.”Initiatives such as implicit-bias training and diversity workshops clearly have not fixed organizational culture, Kaplan adds.“You have to actually change your processes and practices, you have to change how you think about the work, not just for women but also for men,” she says, seeing the need for men to participate equally at home.She also says corporate and full-time positions must be more accommodating to workers — often women — who need greater flexibility because of family obligations. Many have left the workforce or opted for “Plan B” ventures that have given rise to spaces like The Wing.“They still want to make money and they still want to participate in the economy but they can’t,” says Kaplan, bemoaning a lack of supports such as onsite daycare and lactation rooms.As a young woman, Kirton suggests self-esteem can hold back women, too, admitting, “Outside of certain spaces I definitely feel my self-doubt a lot bigger.”“Men sometimes are a little bit more vocal in their capabilities … or have a high level of confidence. Whereas women, not so much, so I can see why it could be intimidating.”Kaplan doesn’t see the same issues, pointing instead to “a world that isn’t going to fund you.”“Women are plenty confident, it’s just that they’re beaten down,” she says.“We’ve moved beyond mentoring, we know that that’s just giving free advice. What you really need is sponsorship, you need people who are going to stick their neck out, who are going to put their money where their mouth is.”last_img read more

Starbucks citing environment is ditching plastic straws

first_imgSEATTLE – Starbucks, citing the environment threat to oceans, will ban plastic straws from all of its stores globally in less than two years.The company becomes the largest food and beverage company operating globally to do so.Starbucks said Monday that it is making available a strawless lid at 8,000 stores in the U.S. and Canada for certain drinks.Starbucks Coffee Co. estimates the switch will eliminate more than 1 billion plastic straws a year.The company’s announcement comes a week after it’s hometown, Seattle, banned single-use plastic straws and utensils at businesses that sell food or drinks in the city.Starbucks said cold beverages in which a straw is typically included make up 50 per cent of the drinks its sells, up from just 37 per cent five years ago.last_img

US oil giant Chevron to acquire Anadarko for 33 bn

first_imgNew York: US oil giant Chevron announced Friday it had agreed to acquire all outstanding shares of Anadarko in a stock and cash transaction valued at $33 billion, or $65 per share. Based on Chevron’s Thursday closing price, Anadarko shareholders will receive 0.39 shares of Chevron and USD16.25 in cash for each Anadarko share held, the company said in a statement. The total enterprise value of the transaction is USD50 billion. “The acquisition of Anadarko will significantly enhance Chevron’s already advantaged Upstream portfolio and further strengthen its leading positions in large, attractive shale, deepwater and natural gas resource basins,” the company said. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscal”The combination of Anadarko’s premier, high-quality assets with our advantaged portfolio strengthens our leading position in the Permian, builds on our deepwater Gulf of Mexico capabilities and will grow our LNG business. “It creates attractive growth opportunities in areas that play to Chevron’s operational strengths and underscores our commitment to short-cycle, higher-return investments.” Anadarko Chairman and CEO Al Walker added: “The strategic combination of Chevron and Anadarko will form a stronger and better company with world-class assets, people and opportunities.” Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostThe deal is the oil industry’s largest since Royal Dutch Shell bought BG Group in 2016, and it sparked speculation that other shale producers are in play. Shares of Apache Corp, which also has extensive acreage in the Permian Basin, jumped 7 percent in premarket trading, while Pioneer Natural Resources Co rose 6 per cent. US crude oil production now surpasses 12 million barrels a day (bpd), and the nation is the third-largest producer of liquefied natural gas (LNG), the super-cooled fuel that is seeing record demand as a cheaper, cleaner alternative for countries that still rely heavily on coal for power generation. Chevron, which already has 2.3 million acres in the Permian Basin, said the deal to buy Anadarko would give the combined company a 75-mile (120-km)-wide corridor across the Permian’s Delaware basin, on the Texas-New Mexico border. Anadarko also has a Mozambique LNG project, part of one of the industry’s largest planned current investments. Chevron Chief Executive Michael Wirth will lead the combined company after the deal closes. Chevron will remain headquartered in San Ramon, California. Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC is Chevron’s financial adviser, while Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP is its legal adviser.last_img read more

Libya court indicts Kadhafi aides on 2011 uprising charges

first_imgTRIPOLI – A Libyan court indicted around 30 senior Moamer Kadhafi aides, including the dictator’s son Seif al-Islam, on Thursday for a raft of alleged offences during the 2011 revolt, prosecutors said.“The court ordered they stand trial on the main charges against them dealing with the repression of the 2011 revolt,” prosecutors’ office spokesman Seddik al-Sour said after the hearing.“The trial date will be set by the Tripoli criminal court,” Sour told a press conference. The charges pressed against the accused include murder, kidnapping, complicity in incitement to rape, plunder, sabotage, embezzlement of public funds and acts harmful to national unity.Only a dozen of the accused appeared in court, said a lawyer who was present at the hearing, held under tight security at a Tripoli court and prison building.Sour said the law did not require that the defendants all be in court to hear the indictment.The fact that “some of the defendants would have needed exceptional security measures to appear prompted the court to decide to notify them of its decision after the hearing”.“But the presence of all the accused will be obligatory at the trial hearings before the criminal court,” Sour added.last_img read more