2011 Queensland Junior State Championships

first_imgThe event will see teams from Queensland’s six regions – South Queensland and Border Districts, Brisbane, South West Queensland, North Queensland, Sunshine Coast and Central Queensland – compete at the championships. After a successful introduction in 2010, the under 12’s Boys and Girls divisions will again be contested at the championships, along with the under 14’s and under 16’s Boys and Girls divisions. The event will commence at 9.00am on Saturday, with the last round of games at 6.10pm. Games will recommence at 7.30am on Sunday, with the Under 12’s and Under 14’s Boys and Girls finals to be played at 1.00pm, while the Under 16’s Boys and Girls finals will be played at 2.00pm. The event will be used to select Queensland’s under 14’s and 16’s Boys and Girls sides that will compete against New Zealand in December this year. Under 12’s Queensland Merit sides will also be selected. For more information, or to keep up-to-date throughout the 2011 Queensland Junior State Championships, please click on the following link:http://www.sportingpulse.com/assoc_page.cgi?c=14-7413-0-0-0&sID=147311last_img read more

Children with asthma have higher risk of obesity

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 9 2018Toddlers with asthma are more likely to become obese children, according to an international study led by USC scientists.The finding is a turnabout for children’s health as obesity has often been seen as a precursor to asthma in children, not the other way around. The study, conducted by a team of 40 scientists including researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, was recently published in the European Respiratory Journal.This is the largest study yet about early-onset asthma and obesity. It focused on more than 20,000 youths across Europe. It shows that, beyond wheezing and shortness of breath, asthma can lead to bodies that make young people more susceptible to other health problems later in life.Lida Chatzi, the senior author and professor of preventive medicine at USC, says asthma and obesity pack a one-two punch against children’s health, which raises concern about a public health crisis due to their prevalence.”We care about this issue because asthma affects approximately 6.5 million children – about one in 10 – in the United States,” Chatzi said. “It’s a chronic childhood disorder and if it increases the risk of obesity, we can advise parents and physicians on how to treat it and intervene to help young children grow up to enjoy healthy, adult lives.”For two decades, scientists have documented the parallel epidemics of childhood asthma and obesity, with focus on how obesity is a risk factor for asthma. In adults, obesity is an important risk factor for new asthma, especially among women, but the relationships appear to differ in children. Few studies look at the problem the other way around to understand how asthma contributes to obesity in kids, which prompted scientists to undertake this research.Drawing upon big data on children’s health collected across Europe, the scientists investigated 21,130 children born between 1990 and 2008 across nine countries, including Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.The children were diagnosed by physicians with asthma at 3 to 4 years old and the scientists followed toddlers into childhood up to 8 years of age. Their goal was to focus on health risks of early-onset asthma.On average, the scientists found that children diagnosed with asthma had a 66 percent higher risk of becoming obese than those without an asthma diagnosis. For children with persistent wheezing symptoms, their risk of developing obesity was 50 percent greater compared to children without such symptoms. Children with active asthma were nearly twice as likely to develop obesity than those without asthma and wheezing, according to the study. The findings are consistent with previous, but smaller, longitudinal studies conducted in the United States that observed asthma increased the risk of obesity.Related StoriesNew technique reduces postoperative deficit of oxygen in the blood in patients with morbid obesityChaos in the house and asthma in children – the connectionUranium toxicity might have caused obesity and diabetes in Kuwait, finds new studyThe causal direction between asthma and obesity is not well understood. Asthma is regarded as a barrier to children’s physical activity that might lead to accumulation of fat in the body, while higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids had been hypothesized to increase risk of obesity in children with asthma. According to the study, children with asthma who used medication had the strongest risk of developing obesity.Since both asthma and obesity have their origins early in life, it is possible that the asthma-obesity association is also established in this critical time window of child development. Previous studies have shown that in utero exposures, such as prenatal diet or maternal obesity, are associated with increased risk of both disorders.”Asthma may contribute to the obesity epidemic. We urgently need to know if prevention and adequate treatment of asthma can reduce the trajectory toward obesity,” said Frank Gilliland, professor of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine, who participated in the study.According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 40 percent of Americans, or 93 million, are obese. The estimated annual medical cost of obesity nationwide was $147 billion in 2008, the CDC estimates. Obesity is linked to diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and stroke.The CDC reports the number of people with asthma in the United States is growing every year. About one in 12 Americans is afflicted with the illness. In smoggy places, like California’s San Joaquin Valley, about 1 in 6 children suffer from asthma, the highest rate in the country.In Europe, 1 in 8 people die due to lung diseases – or about one person per minute. It includes well-known diseases like asthma and lung cancer and other less-known diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which is now the third most common cause of death, according to the European Respiratory Society. Source:https://www.usc.edu/last_img read more

How to avoid shoulder injury related to vaccine administration

first_img Source:https://uwaterloo.ca/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 24 2018A study by researchers at the University of Waterloo reiterates the need for health care professionals, including pharmacists, to take certain precautions to minimize the risk of their patients suffering shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA).SIRVA is an uncommon and understudied phenomenon that people may experience after receiving an improperly administered vaccination. It occurs when an injection is administered too high in the arm, and the vaccine is delivered to the shoulder capsule instead of the deltoid muscle.”With flu season underway and flu vaccinations widely available, both the public and health care providers should understand how to recognize and respond to SIRVA,” said Kelly Grindrod, a professor in the School of Pharmacy at Waterloo. “There are strategies we can adopt to decrease the likelihood of experiencing SIRVA.Related StoriesResearchers develop improved vaccine for meningitis and bloodstream infectionsGeorgia State researcher wins $3.26 million federal grant to develop universal flu vaccineVaccine drama on display in California’s Capitol”When going for your flu shot, wear a sleeveless shirt or a shirt where the sleeves can easily be rolled up. Don’t pull the neck of your shirt down as this can lead to a vaccine being injected into the shoulder instead of the arm. Putting your hand on your hip with your elbow out and away from the body will also help relax the deltoid muscle where the injection is going.”It is common to experience a dull muscle ache after a vaccine injection, but that pain disappears within a few days. By contrast, SIRVA will result in pain that begins within 48 hours of vaccine administration and does not improve with over-the-counter painkiller medications”In patients who experience SIRVA, months may pass by, and patients will still complain of increasing pain, weakness, and impaired mobility in the injected arm. Simple actions like lifting your arm to brush your teeth can cause pain,” said Grindrod. “It’s important that we learn to recognize these signs of SIRVA so that we can access appropriate treatment.”People experiencing these symptoms should talk to their doctor. An ultrasound scan is necessary to diagnose SIRVA and determine the level and type of damage. Treatment includes a corticosteroid injection to the shoulder or physiotherapy.Though SIRVA is fairly uncommon, it also often goes undiagnosed. Improved awareness about SIRVA is necessary for health care providers as well as patients. Grindrod and co-authors conducted a review of the literature to develop resources that teach health care providers about SIRVA and how to avoid it by using proper vaccination landmarking techniques.last_img read more

Reducing alcohol use could help quit daily smoking habit

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 28 2018If quitting smoking is one of your New Year’s resolutions, you might want to consider cutting back on your drinking, too.New research has found that heavy drinkers who are trying to stop smoking may find that reducing their alcohol use can also help them quit their daily smoking habit. Heavy drinkers’ nicotine metabolite ratio – a biomarker that indicates how quickly a person’s body metabolizes nicotine – reduced as they cut back on their drinking.Past research has suggested that people with higher nicotine metabolism ratios are likely to smoke more and that people with higher rates have a harder time quitting. Slowing a person’s nicotine metabolism rate through reduced drinking could provide an edge when trying to stop smoking, which is known to be a difficult task, said Sarah Dermody, an assistant professor at Oregon State University and the study’s lead author.”It takes a lot of determination to quit smoking, often several attempts,” Dermody said. “This research suggests that drinking is changing the nicotine metabolism as indexed by the nicotine metabolite ratio, and that daily smoking and heavy drinking may best be treated together.”The study was just published in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research.Dermody, who is based in in the School of Psychological Science in OSU’s College of Liberal Arts, studies risky behaviors such as alcohol and nicotine use with the goal of better understanding factors that contribute to alcohol and nicotine use and how best to intervene with problematic use of these substances.Use of both alcohol and cigarettes is widespread, with nearly 1 in 5 adults using both. Cigarette use is especially prevalent in heavy drinkers. Drinking is a well-established risk factor for smoking, and smoking is well-established risk factor for drinking.Dermody and colleagues at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Canada, wanted to better understand the links between the two. They studied the nicotine metabolite ratio, an index of nicotine metabolism, in a group of 22 daily smokers who were seeking treatment for alcohol use disorder – the medical term for severe problem drinking – over several weeks.Related StoriesStudy finds increase in cigarette smoking among minority teens after college affirmative action bansSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchEffective stop smoking treatments less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditions”What’s really interesting is that the nicotine metabolite ratio is clinically useful,” Dermody said. “People with a higher ratio have a harder time quitting smoking cold turkey. They have are also less likely to successfully quit using nicotine replacement therapy products.”They found that as the men in the study group reduced their drinking – from an average of 29 drinks per week to 7 – their nicotine metabolite rate also dropped.The researchers’ findings for men replicated those of an earlier study that found similar effects and provide further evidence of the value of the nicotine metabolite ratio biomarker to inform treatment for smokers trying to quit, Dermody said.”The nicotine metabolite ratio was thought to be a stable index, but it may not be as stable as we thought,” Dermody said. “From a clinical standpoint, that’s a positive thing, because if someone wants to stop smoking, we may want to encourage them to reduce their drinking to encourage their smoking cessation plan.”The women in the study did not see reductions in their nicotine metabolite ratio, but the researchers also did not find that the women in the study reduced their drinking significantly during the study period.”The rate of drinking for women in the study started low and stayed low,” Dermody said. “I anticipate that in a larger generalized study we would not see the difference between men and women like that.”Dermody is preparing a new study of the links between smoking and drinking. She hopes to recruit heavy drinkers who also smoke to participate in an intervention to reduce their drinking. The study will also examine the effects on smoking to try and replicate the findings in a larger group.”This research is demonstrating the value in addressing both smoking and drinking together,” she said. “The question now is how best to do that.”Source: https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/reducing-drinking-could-help-smoking-cessation-research-findslast_img read more

Riskier male sex pushes Europes syphilis rates up 70 since 2010

first_imgLONDON (Reuters) – Syphilis cases have soared in Europe over the last decade and become, for the first time since the early 2000s, more common in some countries than new cases of HIV, health experts said on Friday.Reported cases of the sexually transmitted disease are up by 70% since 2010, a report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) showed – with the rise driven by more unprotected sex and riskier sexual behaviour among gay men.”The increases in syphilis infections that we see across Europe … are a result of several factors, such as people having sex without condoms and multiple sexual partners, combined with a reduced fear of acquiring HIV,” said Andrew Amato-Gauci, an ECDC expert on sexually transmitted infections.The European report comes after the World Health Organization said last month that around a million people each day worldwide catch a sexually transmitted infection. Related News Related News Nation 11 Jul 2019 Birth control injections given to protect Orang Asli women from unsafe pregnancies, says Health Minister Nation 11 Jul 2019 Health Ministry: Back up allegations of forced birth control with evidencecenter_img World 08 Jul 2019 Man wakes up at own funeral after doctors declared him dead {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Left untreated, syphilis can have severe complications in men and women, including causing stillbirths and newborn deaths and increasing the risk of HIV. Syphilis was one of the leading causes of baby loss globally in 2016.The Stockholm-based ECDC, which monitors health and disease in Europe, said that overall, more than 260,000 syphilis cases were reported from 30 countries from 2007 to 2017. In 2017, syphilis rates reached an all-time high with more than 33,000 reported cases, the ECDC said. This meant that for the first time since the early 2000s, the region reported more cases of syphilis than new cases of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS.But the problem varied significantly by country, with rates more than doubling in five countries – Britain, Germany, Ireland, Iceland and Malta – but dropping by 50% or more in Estonia and Romania.Close to two-thirds of the cases reported between 2007 and 2017 where sexual orientation was known were in men who have sex with men, the ECDC report said, while heterosexual men contributed 23% of cases and women 15%. The proportion of cases diagnosed among men who have sex with men ranged from less than 20% in Latvia, Lithuania and Romania to more than 80% in France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Britain.Amato-Gauci said complacency among men who have gay sex and seem unconcerned about HIV risks appeared to be fuelling the problem. “To reverse this trend, we need to encourage people to use condoms consistently with new and casual partners,” he said. (Reporting by Kate Kelland; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne)last_img read more