Unilever Drops Lawsuit against Hampton Creek Mayonnaise

first_imgUnilever PLC, the famous consumer goods giant, announced on Thursday that it was dropping a mislabelling lawsuit against San Francisco-based food startup Hampton Creek Foods.”Unilever has decided to withdraw its lawsuit against Hampton Creek so that Hampton Creek can address its label directly with industry groups and appropriate regulatory authorities,” Mike Faherty, Vice President for Foods of Unilever North America, said in a statement.Though Unilever didn’t specify why it dropped the lawsuit, Hamptons Creek CEO said that it was probably because Unilever realized, “It’s not the company they are or the company they want to be,” according to Forbes.Unilever sued Hampton Creek last month over its egg-free “Just Mayo” mayonnaise alleging that the company mislabelled its product. It asserted that a major ingredient in Mayonnaise is egg and that Hampton Creek was misleading its customers.”By calling its vegan sandwich spread ‘Just Mayo,’ Hampton Creek falsely communicates to consumers that Just Mayo is mayonnaise, when it in fact, it is not,” the lawsuit alleged.However, the world questioned Unilever’s lawsuit over such a small issue. The case didn’t just provide free press to Hampton Creek but also saw many arguments against Unilever’s stand in the lawsuit.Hampton Creek CEO Josh Tetrick said that it was surprising that such a big company would sue over such a silly issue. He also predicted that Unilever would drop its lawsuit soon, and that eventually came true, reports Forbes.”Hampton Creek was founded to open our eyes to the problems the world faces. This moment has only validated why,” Tetrick said in response to Unilever’s statement.Hampton Creek specialises in making Vegan products and eliminating the use of egg in condiments. The company uses new technology to take the best out of plants and make food better. But CEO Tetrick acknowledges that the same technology scares away several potential buyers.”We are not doing synthetic engineering. We are not manipulating genes. We are screening through plants in a way that is novel and using them to make food better,” Tetrick was quoted by The Financial Times.Thursday bore good news for the Bill Gates-backed food startup. Hampton Creek announced that it had raised $90 million in a new round of funding. The capital valued the company at $500 million.last_img read more

WATCH Bajrang Dal activists threaten to chop off limbs and head of

first_imgBajrang Dal activists in Karnataka threatened to sever the limbs of a Congress candidate. A video of the entire incident went viral on multiple social media platforms. Three activists were detained after they were identified by the police from the video. The incident took place within the Bantwal rural police jurisdiction.”The video surfaced following victory celebration that members of the organisation took out in wake of the announcement of results of the general election on Thursday,” BM Laxmi Prasad, Superintendent of Police was quoted as saying by Times of India.The video showed Bajrang Dal activists abusing Mithun in Tulu threatening that if he spoke against them and the Bajrang Dal, they would chop off his arms and legs and even his head if necessary. This aggression against him was because Mithun had said in one of his campaign speeches that he would ban the Bajrang Dal from the state if necessary.Mithun M Rai, the Congress candidate of the Dakshina Lok Sabha constituency, was the victim in the incident. The Bajrang Dal activists were celebrating Bharatiya Janata Party’s win in the Lok Sabha elections on Thursday when they began threatening the Congress candidate in the boisterous party.The Congress candidate, Mithun, filed a complaint against the three men who threatened him at the Bantwal circle police station. Saharangowda V H, the investigating officer, told TOI that a case was filed under sections 143 (unlawful assembly), 149 (a member of unlawful assembly guilty of offence committed in prosecution of common object), 504 (intentionally provoking or insulting another person) 506 (criminal intimidation) of the Indian Penal Code.last_img read more

Lawsuit Filed In Womans Death In Houston Hotel During Harvey

Twitter via @TiffanyAlanizA woman whose body was found 11 days after she made a frantic cellphone call from a Houston hotel elevator as floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey rushed in exited the elevator in the basement only to struggle against a strong waist-high current strewn with debris, a lawsuit filed Monday says.Jill Renick’s family filed a civil lawsuit in district court in Dallas, saying there wasn’t proper planning for flooding at the Omni Houston Hotel, where Renick worked and where flooding had occurred before. The lawsuit, which lists Omni Hotels and Resorts and Otis Elevator Company among the defendants, reveals new details of what happened in the moments leading up to the drowning of 48-year-old Renick.Renick “suffered a terrifying and horrific death” that was “unnecessary and easily preventable,” according to the lawsuit.“It’s just inexcusable for a hotel operation of this size to be that irresponsible,” said Rob Crain, the lead attorney for the family.The fate of Renick, who was the director of spa services at the hotel, was one of the most perplexing mysteries that came out of Harvey’s devastating flooding. She disappeared in the early morning hours of Aug. 27 as floodwaters inundated Houston. Her body was finally discovered on Sept. 7 in the ceiling of the hotel’s basement.“I don’t want this to happen to anybody again — employee or guest,” said Renick’s sister, Pam Eslinger.Renick, who spent the night with her dog in a room on the hotel’s third floor, was called by a staffer around 5:15 a.m. on Aug. 27 and told to “come downstairs,” Crain said.“We’ve asked for more specificity as to what she was told and we were told that that’s pretty much it: that she was told to come downstairs,” Crain said.The lawsuit said there’s no indication she was told the basement and elevator shafts were flooding, or that she was told to avoid the elevators. The lawsuit also adds that the elevators weren’t disabled, nor were they barricaded to prevent passengers from entering.“She was not given any indication that anything was remiss or dangerous for her to go downstairs,” Crain said, adding, “There was not a coordinated plan that was being implemented.”About 5:40 a.m., Renick made the call for help. The lawsuit says that according to the hotel, Renick said she was trapped in the basement service elevator and water was coming in. The lawsuit also says Renick “was heard screaming and clamoring for help by people on the first floor.”The lawsuit notes that the third floor, where she was staying, doesn’t have access to the service elevator so she would have likely had to access it from the first or second floors.According to the lawsuit, she was somehow able to exit the elevator into the basement. Video footage provided by the hotel to her family’s attorneys shows her coming from the area of the service elevator at 5:44 a.m.“We see her going against the flow of the floodwaters. We also see her shortly thereafter coming back with the flow of the water,” said Crain, who added, “It is clearly somebody who is trying to find a way out of this horribly terrifying condition.”The video ends at 5:45 a.m. and Renick isn’t seen alive again. “She desperately searched for a way out before climbing above the ceiling tiles and ceiling joists for the last pockets of air,” says the lawsuit, which adds that floodwaters eventually rose to the hotel’s first floor.The lawsuit says that before Renick was called in her room it was known that the basement and elevator shafts were flooding, noting that in that time period, people who appear to be hotel employees can be seen on the video walking through the accumulating water in the basement.The hotel, located near the Buffalo Bayou, has a history of flooding and is located in a flood plain, according to the lawsuit.The lawsuit also alleges that Otis Elevator, which had a contract with the hotel to maintain and service the elevators, should’ve installed flood sensors and warned users of the dangers of operating an elevator in flooding.Spokeswomen for both Omni and Otis said they don’t comment on pending litigation.The Occupational Safety and Health Administration in February fined the hotel for a violation, saying that the elevators being kept operational during flooding exposed employees to drowning.The hotel is currently undergoing a $30 million renovation and is set to reopen in November.Eslinger described her sister as the kind of person who “everybody gravitated to.”“She was wonderful and she’s missed terribly every day,” Eslinger said. Share read more

Twitter Makes IPO Filing Public

first_img Enroll Now for Free Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Twitter made its S-1 filing available to the public on Thursday, finally shedding some light on its initial public offering plans.The company has seen rapid growth recently. In 2012 the company saw an increase in revenue of 198 percent to about $317 million and a net loss decrease of 38 percent to about $79 million, according to the filing.According to the filing, Twitter, which plans to trade under the ticker TWTR, has 250 million monthly active users, 100 million of those are daily active users.The company said in the filing that mobile is the primary driver of its business and that 75 percent of the monthly active users access Twitter from a mobile device.There’s still a lot of information that is missing from the filing, like the number of shares the company plans to offer and the price of the shares, but it does give some insight into which investors stand to make the most money off the offering.Jack Dorsey has a 4.9 percent stake in the company, Evan Williams has a 12 percent stake and Peter Fenton, a Twitter board member, has a 6.7 percent stake.In September, the company announced it had confidentially submitted documents to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission with plans to go public, but Twitter didn’t reveal anything else about its IPO plans. The filing was made under the JOBS Act, which allows companies making less than $1 billion in revenue to work with regulators on IPO plans before actually making it public.The micro-blogging site has been valued at about $10 billion and is one of the most anticipated Silicon Valley IPOs since Facebook. Related: Experts Say Twitter Didn’t Botch Its IPO Announcement This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Brought to you by CNBC October 3, 2013 2 min readlast_img read more