Game of Thrones prequel to show construction of The Wall

first_imgBran the Builder in Game of Thrones prequelGame of Thrones (@gameofthrones/Instagram)Now that Game of Thrones has finally ended, Westeros fans are eagerly waiting to see Game of Thrones prequel, rumored titled Bloodmoon.As per earlier interviews, Game of Thrones prequel is set around 5000 years ago before the events showed in the television adaptation of The Song of Ice and Fire. The prequel will chronicle the world’s descent from the Golden Age of Heroes into its darkest hour. As per several speculations, darkest hour in the series means the birth of Night King and subsequently the rise of White Walkers.As per George RR Martins books, the Age of Heroes is the time period in which the Children of the Forest made a pact with humans or men, and when Bran the Builder — the Stark ancestor lived. As per the old nan tales, Bran the Builder is the one who built The Wall to keep the White Walkers at the bay.Since the prequel is going to feature Bran the Builder, it is most likely that we finally get to see the construction of the Winterfell and The Wall.As per the books, the Wall is a colossal fortification which stretches for more than 482 kilometers along the Northern border of the Seven Kingdoms, separating the entire realm from the domain of the wildlings who live beyond. The wall is reported to be over 700 feet tall and it averages 300 feet in width. Bran Stark is the Night KingFacebookThe Wall was constructed by Bran the Builder and is supposed to have all sorts of magic to protect it from the White Walkers. As per the events are shown in Game of Thrones, the Wall has grown considerably since it was first constructed by Bran, as the Night’s Watch has spent thousands of years augmenting it with huge ice blocks and has even upgraded its defense system.As of now, there is nothing sure about Game of Thrones prequel. The production is likely to begin from this June and fans are hoping to see something magical when it will finally air on HBO in 2020 or 2021. The much-awaited Game of Thrones prequel will feature an ensemble cast of Naomi Watts, Josh Whitehouse, Naomi Ackie, Denise Gough, Jamie Campbell Bower, and Sheila Atim. The show’s story is written by George RR Martin and Jane Goldman is overlooking the project as the showrunner.last_img read more

Coastal Counties From Greater Houston Region Are The Most Impacted By Severe

first_img X Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: National Weather Service/Houston-GalvestonAlthough the rain is moving out of our area, winter has made a strong entrance in Texas with severe weather hitting several parts of the state for the past few days.The National Weather Service reports persistent rains started on Friday night and the heaviest occurred on Saturday.The severe weather hit hardest in Chambers County, as well as the southern section of Galveston County and the southeast part of Brazoria County.Texas City got about a foot of rain, but it was mostly street flooding.“The fortunate part was that, according to our estimates and what we’ve gathered, we had approximately only five homes that had some water damage,” says Thomas Munoz, Emergency Management Coordinator for Texas City.In Galveston County, the airport registered almost 10 inches of rain and the city of La Marque had more than seven inches, while the bad weather even produced some hail in Wharton County.Dan Reilly, a meteorologist with the Houston-Galveston office of the National Weather Service, notes Harris County was spared any significant damage.“Anywhere from around an inch, some areas even three to six inches, particularly in the southeast and the northwest,” Reilly detailed about the impact in Harris County.The forecast for the rest of the week includes more rain on Wednesday night. 00:00 /01:11 Share last_img read more

Atmospheric carbon dioxide causing global greening making some areas warmer and some

first_img Rising CO2 due to climate change may not improve agriculture, model shows Explore further Citation: Atmospheric carbon dioxide causing global greening making some areas warmer and some colder (2017, May 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-atmospheric-carbon-dioxide-global-greening.html Credit: Wikipedia. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Giovanni Forzieri et al. Satellites reveal contrasting responses of regional climate to the widespread greening of Earth, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aal1727AbstractChanges in vegetation cover associated to the observed greening may affect several biophysical processes, whose net effects on climate are unclear. Here, we analyze remotely sensed dynamics in leaf area index (LAI) and energy fluxes to explore the associated variation in local climate. We show that the increasing trend in LAI contributed to the warming of boreal zones through a reduction of surface albedo, and to an evaporation-driven cooling in arid regions. The interplay between LAI and surface biophysics is amplified up to five times under extreme warm-dry and cold-wet years. Altogether, these signals reveal that the recent dynamics in global vegetation have had relevant biophysical impacts on the local climates and should be considered in the design of local mitigation and adaptation plans.center_img In addition to causing the atmosphere to heat up in general, the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide is also causing many parts of the planet that were already green to become greener, the researchers report. That greening, they suggest, causes some regional areas to become slightly warmer and others cooler. But it is not just atmospheric carbon that is contributing to the greening. Nitrogen used in fertilizers makes its way into natural ecosystems, causing changes. The land is also changed by human activities.In an area that is generally warm, an increase in leaf cover can lead to localized cooling due to plant transpiration (water evaporating) which condenses in the air, the researchers report. In cooler places, the impact can be the opposite—in boreal regions (tree covered) and colder places, local temperatures can rise slightly due to less sunlight being reflected back from the surface.To come to these conclusions, the researchers studied satellite data for the period 1982 to 2011, which allowed them to assign a leaf area index (LAI) to various parts of the Earth’s surface. In mapping the entire planet, the group found that for approximately 60 percent of all plant areas, an increase in greening has mitigated global warming by approximately 14 percent. For colder areas, greening has led to a rise in air temperatures of approximately 10 percent. They also found that the impact could be more dramatic during extreme weather conditions—by up to five times, for example, during warm and dry periods or cold and wet periods.The researchers suggest their findings indicate that changes to vegetation clearly have an impact on local climate, and thus should be taken into consideration as mitigation and adaptation strategies are developed to deal with a warming planet. © 2017 Phys.org (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with the Directorate for Sustainable Resources in Italy and Ghent University in Belgium has found evidence that shows some parts of the planet are becoming cooler and others warmer due to an increase in localized greening. As the team notes in their paper published in the journal Science, much of the increase in greening is due to an increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Journal information: Sciencelast_img read more