Apple defends controversial battery certification warning message

first_img $999 $999 Originally published on Aug. 8 at 3:08 a.m. PTUpdate, Aug. 14: Adds Apple comment and information. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. 8:10 Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier See it • Apple iPhone XS Best Buy Tags $999 That realization caused outcry and allegations that Apple is “locking iPhone batteries to discourage repair,” as iFixit put it. “Apple is effectively announcing a drastic new policy: only Apple batteries can go in iPhones, and only they can install them,” the site said. But Apple on Wednesday defended the move, saying it displays the message to keep customers safe and make sure battery replacements are done properly. “Last year we introduced a new feature to notify customers if we were unable to verify that a new, genuine battery was installed by a certified technician following Apple repair processes,” the company said in a statement. “This information is there to help protect our customers from damaged, poor quality or used batteries, which can lead to safety or performance issues. This notification does not impact the customer’s ability to use the phone after an unauthorized repair.”People are holding onto their smartphones longer than before, and for many, the battery is one of the biggest reasons to eventually upgrade. Being able to monitor the battery’s health, and cheaply replace it, lets people wait longer to buy newer models. Apple’s iPhone battery practices have drawn scrutiny in the past. In late 2017, the company admitted that software it released the previous year slowed down iPhones to offset problems with their aging lithium ion batteries. As batteries get older, they don’t hold their charges as well as newer batteries, and they can have worse problems when the charge is low or the temperature is cold. Apple ended up releasing new features to help iPhone owners monitor their batteries, and it offered a short-term, 63% discount on its battery replacement program.Battery healthThe warning message, which is found in the iPhone’s settings, usually indicates that your battery is degraded and must be replaced, iFixit said. The publication’s tests revealed that even a brand-new, genuine Apple battery caused the message to appear. It appears on iPhones running iOS 12 and the iOS 13 beta.iphone-battery-healthIf you replace your iPhone battery on your own, you won’t be able to monitor the battery’s health.  Apple The update won’t throttle the battery’s performance or prevent you from using your phone, but you won’t be able to see details of your battery’s health. The site compared this to a car displaying a Check Oil light that only a Ford dealership can get rid of.The only way to get rid of the message is to have an Apple Genius or an Apple Authorized Service Provider authenticate it — essentially forcing you to take the battery through official channels.Apple has over 1,800 authorized service providers across the US, including all Best Buy stores, and 5,000 around the globe. In a support page about batteries, the company noted that if the message appears, you should contact an authorized service provider to have the iPhone checked. “We take the safety of our customers very seriously and want to make sure any battery replacement is done properly,” Apple said in its statement Wednesday.  Sprint Apple wants you to make iPhone battery replacements through official channels, to ensure the battery’s safety. Angela Lang/CNET A teardown specialist said Apple is making it hard to replace your own iPhone batteries. But the tech giant on Wednesday defended how it authenticates the batteries used in its iPhones, saying it’s the only way to ensure they meet its standards.Starting with iOS 12.1 from October 2018, Apple included the ability to monitor the health of your iPhone XS, XS Max and XR battery. By going into settings, you can see the maximum capacity your battery is able to charge and whether it supports normal peak performance. You can also see if you should replace your battery.But if you swap your battery yourself or go to a nonauthorized vendor, you’ll see a Service message that warns Apple is unable to verify if your iPhone has a genuine Apple battery, as noted last week by teardown specialist iFixit. You can still replace your battery, but you won’t be able to monitor the health of the battery unless you’re using one from Apple or an authorized reseller.  Now playing: Watch this: Commentscenter_img $999 See It 17 Share your voice reading • Apple defends controversial battery certification warning message Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it See All Boost Mobile Apple See It Three new iPhone 11 models coming in September, rumor… See It Phones Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demand Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X iOS 13 iOS 12 Applelast_img read more

Chinas Manufacturing Index Slides in November PBOC Should Introduce More Stimulus

first_imgChina’s manufacturing index slipped in November reflecting the growing weakness in the world’s second largest economy.Two separate surveys published on Monday triggered a new set of concerns from experts who think the People’s Bank of China should introduce more regulations to steer away from a hard market crash.The SlideChina’s official Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) fell to 50.3, an eight-month low and was 0.05 points down from October’s 50.8 reading.The final HSBC/Markit China Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) was unchanged at the six-month low of 50.0 but the figure is estimated to be the breakeven point – which separates expansion and contraction – for China’s economy.While the official survey focuses on the performance of large, government-owned factories, the HSBC survey analyzes growth among the smaller and private manufacturers. Both surveys showed a slide.Weak demand from overseas clients has put a damper on the manufacturing industry. Domestic demand exceeded foreign demand and new export orders also decreased.”The PMI data suggests that fundamentals are still very weak. Investment in property and manufacturing remains weak, so the government is the only one spending. And when government spending wanes in the winter months, the economy falls off,” Larry Hu, an economist at Macquarie Group told MarketWatch, referring to the fact that construction projects usually take a hit during the winters.Failed Attempt?The People’s Bank of China recently lowered its lending rate by 40 base points. The cut came as a surprise to many because the government was reluctant to admit that the economy was shrinking. But that didn’t seem to work for the country.”The PBOC’s rate cut appears to have failed to improve sentiment, and we see little improvement in activity indicators in November,” ANZ wrote in a research note, according to Reuters.What to ExpectGoing forward, experts believe that the Chinese government will introduce more stimuli to help revive the economy.”In order to maintain growth for the whole year at around 7.5 percent (the official target), we believe that Chinese authorities will intensify easing efforts in December to accelerate growth momentum,” ANZ’s research note read.Barclays predicts two more benchmark cuts in interest rates in the first half of 2015 and three cuts in the reserve ratio deposits, the first one of which is expected this month.”Given China’s structural challenges, we continue to believe more rate cuts are necessary. We believe that lowering rates will mainly help to reduce the debt burden, lower financial risks, support business sentiment, and sustain private demand,” Jian Chang of Barclays wrote in a note to CNBC.Some experts suggest the government must cut taxes to boost the economy.last_img read more

Web Giants to Cooperate on Removal of Extremist Content

first_img 2 min read This story originally appeared on Reuters Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. December 6, 2016 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Web giants YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Microsoft will step up efforts to remove extremist content from their websites by creating a common database.The companies will share “hashes” — unique digital fingerprints they automatically assign to videos or photos — of extremist content they have removed from their websites to enable their peers to identify the same content on their platforms.”We hope this collaboration will lead to greater efficiency as we continue to enforce our policies to help curb the pressing global issue of terrorist content online,” the companies said in a statement on Tuesday.Tech companies have long resisted outside intervention in how their sites should be policed, but have come under increasing pressure from Western governments to do more to remove extremist content following a wave of militant attacks.YouTube and Facebook have begun to use hashes to automatically remove extremist content.But many providers have relied until now mainly on users to flag content that violates terms of service. Flagged material is then individually reviewed by human editors who delete postings found to be in violation.Twitter suspended 235,000 accounts between February and August this year and has expanded the teams reviewing reports of extremist content.Each company will decide what image and video hashes to add to the database and matching content will not be automatically removed, they said.The database will be up and running in early 2017 and more companies could be brought into the partnership.The European Union set up an EU Internet Forum last year bringing together the internet companies, interior ministers and the EU Counter-Terrorism Coordinator to find ways of removing extremist content.The Forum will meet again on Thursday, when ministers are expected to ask the companies about their efforts and helping to provide evidence to convict foreign fighters.(Reporting by Julia Fioretti; editing by John Stonestreet)last_img read more