Will Clark, asked about Giants managerial job: ‘It’s not off the radar’

first_imgDon’t take this the wrong way. Nobody is rushing Bruce Bochy toward the exit.But, like sand through an hourglass, his time as Giants manager is slowly slipping away. And if you know us, it’s only a matter of time before the names of prospective managerial candidates begin hitting the wall. In fact, here comes one now.On a far-ranging, fun and entertaining post published Monday on nbcsports.com, Amy Gutierrez put the question to one of the most popular Giants to ever wear the interlocking SF.“ …last_img

South African food

first_imgFine food and wine in a restaurant inStellenbosch in the Western Cape.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free photos, visit the image library.)MEDIA CONTACTS• South African Chefs Association+27 11 482 7250info@saca.co.zaRELATED ARTICLES• SA restaurant tops in food Oscars• Celebrating SA’s township food• Dash of Zulu in heart of London• SA chocolates for all Oscar starsBarbara LudmanA delicious way to experience the Rainbow Nation is through its food. Contributions from the cultures that created South Africa make its modern cuisine one of the most exciting in Africa.For the more daring diner, South Africa offers culinary challenges ranging from crocodile sirloin to fried caterpillars to sheep heads. All three are reputed to be delicious.For the not-quite so brave, there are myriad indigenous delicacies such as biltong (dried, salted meat), bobotie (a much-improved version of Shepherd’s pie) and boerewors (hand-made farm sausages).Umnqusho, a stew of roughly crushed dried maize kernels mixed with sugar or butter beans, is said to be former president Nelson Mandela ’s favourite food. Maize meal porridge, crumbly or soft, accompanies most meals. And fried chicken from fast-food outlets is widely popular.Those who prefer to play it altogether safe will find that most eateries offer a familiar global menu – anything from hamburgers to sushi to pad thai to spaghetti bolognaise. And you can drink the tap water.Restaurant guides list close to two dozen national styles, including Vietnamese and Swiss. On a single street in a Johannesburg suburb, one finds Italian restaurants, two or three varieties of Chinese cookery, Japanese, Moroccan, French, Portuguese and Indian food, both Tandoor and Gujarati.Not far away are Congolese restaurants, Greek, even Brazilian and Korean establishments, and, everywhere, fusion, displaying the fantasies of creative chefs.But there are niche specialities as well, and not a few surprises. Some of the world’s best curries can be found in Durban; fine French cuisine in Franschhoek; the freshest fish, caught only hours before, in Cape Town and Hermanus. Wine estates in Western Cape province offer meals, often French- or English-themed, along with wine tastings. High tea is on offer at most major hotels throughout the country: high tea at the Mount Nelson Hotel in Cape Town is a traditional treat.Those in search of authentic South African cuisine have to look harder for those few establishments that specialise in it – like the justly famous Gramadoelas in central Johannesburg, Wandie’s Place in Soweto, the Africa Café in central Cape Town or smaller restaurants in that city’s Bo-Kaap, in Khayelitsha and Langa.MeatBasically, however, South Africans eat meat – and lots of it.Lamb from the Karoo is highly prized. Game is ubiquitous: restaurants and butchers offer mostly impala or kudu, but springbok, warthog and crocodile are sometimes available. So, for the brave, is the mopani worm, the caterpillar of the emperor moth, which is boiled, then sun-dried. Ostrich goes as guilt-free red meat, low in cholesterol and farmed in the Karoo.Whatever the meat chosen, there are braais – or barbecues – everywhere: on the pavement during the week, as fast food for labourers; and in backyards in the suburbs on weekends.What goes on the backyard grill will almost certainly be boerewors, a spicy sausage and as close to a national food as one can get. Steak houses may specialise in flame-grilled aged sirloin, but they also offer boerewors. Even celebrity chefs become involved in boerewors cookouts.There are varieties of biltong in every café, in big cities and little dorps. Every weekend there wafts from neighbourhoods rich and poor the smell of spicy sosaties being grilled over the braai.Rainbow cuisineIt was the search for food that shaped modern South Africa: spices drew the Dutch East India Company to Java in the mid-1600s, and the need for a half-way refreshment stop for its ships rounding the Cape impelled the company to plant a farm at the tip of Africa. There are sections of Commander Jan van Riebeeck’s wild almond hedge still standing in the Kirstenbosch Gardens in Cape Town.That farm changed the region forever. The company discovered it was easier to bring in thousands of hapless slaves from Java to work in the fields than to keep trying to entrap the local people, mostly Khoi and San, who seemed singularly unimpressed with the Dutch and their ways. The Malay slaves brought their cuisine, perhaps the best-known of all South African cooking styles.The French Huguenots arrived soon after the Dutch, and changed the landscape in wonderful ways with the vines they imported. They soon discovered a need for men and women to work in their vineyards, and turned to the Malay slaves (and the few Khoi and San they could lure into employment).Much later, sugar farmers brought indentured labourers from India to cut the cane. The British, looking for gold and empire, also brought their customs and cuisine, as did German immigrants.In the 20th century, Chinese workmen and Japanese entrepreneurs arrived to seek their fortunes.While all these groups brought new customs and cuisine, black communities continued to eat their traditional foods: beef and game, sorghum, maize, root vegetables and wild greens like morogo.Today the resultant kaleidoscope – the famous “rainbow” – applies not only to the people but to the food, for one finds in South Africa the most extraordinary range of cuisines.Useful linksRestaurant guides Eat Out Wine Magazine Dining Out Where to Eat What2Night Yellow Pages CityGuide Dining out in Joburg Restaurants.co.za Webdining Other food-related websites ShowcookThis web-based magazine carries interesting articles about food in South Africa and abroad, written by some of the best-known foodies in the country. It also offers book reviews and recipes.Confrerie de la Chaine des Rotisseurs The site of the international society devoted to fine dining lists events of the various baillages, or chapters – there are six in South Africa. These gatherings are usually black-tie dinners at top restaurants, but are occasionally more informal events.South African Chefs Association Mainly for professional chefs and restaurateurs, the site offers links to chefs’ associations worldwide, a job site with posts in South Africa and overseas, a list of industry events and food festivals, and pages by a range of chefs, many with recipes. Also on the site: the Centre for Culinary Excellence, with information about master classes for chefs wishingPrue LeithThe website of the chef’s academy, restaurant and catering service named for Prue Leith OBE, who keeps a close eye on it. The board includes some of the major names in South African gastronomy.South African Chefs Academy The website of one of the top chef schools in the country, the SA Chefs Academy. It includes links to a few other food sites and some ezines.last_img read more

Airline passengers tipped to double by 2035

first_imgPassengers who think airports are crowded now should brace themselves to deal with twice as many people by 2035.The International Air Transport Association is predicting passenger numbers will almost double from 3.8 billion this year to 7.2 billion in 2035 based on an annual compound average growth rate of 3.7 percent.But it  warned of long delays for passengers and flights unless air transport stakeholders work together to improve infrastructure.The airline industry group also cautioned a  strengthening of the current trend towards trade protectionism could cut growth to 5.8 billion, affecting aviation jobs and the global economy, as barriers slow growth to an annual compound growth rate of 2.5 percent.”Economic growth is the only durable solution for the world’s current economic woes, ” IATA director general Alexandre De Juniac told the World Passenger Symposium in Dubai on Tuesday. “Yet we see governments raising barriers to trade rather than making it easier. If this continues in the long-term, it will mean slower growth and the world will be poorer for itBased on the 3.7 percent growth figure, IATA forecasts the Asia-Pacific region will be the biggest growth driver with China tipped to provide 817 million new passengers annually in 2035 and displace the US as the world’s biggest aviation market.The US will gain an additional 484 million passengers to retain second place while India, with an additional 322 million passengers, will replace the UK in third place.Indonesia and Vietnam are also forecast to grow quickly to round out the top five with 135 million and 112 million new passengers, respectively.Routes to, from and within the Asia-Pacific will grow at 4.7 per cent to see an extra 1.8 billion passengers a year in two decades’ time to bring the overall market size to 3.1 billion.North American growth of 2.8 per cent annually will see 1.3 billion passengers travelling each year, up by 536 million, while Europe will record the slowest growth rate of 2.5 per cent to add 570 million passengers and hit 1.5 billion travellers annually by 2035.The Middle east will continue to grow strongly at 5 per cent per year to add 238 million passengers annually by 2035 and bring to total market size to 414 million passengers. The United Arab Emirates will top the region’s growth at 6.3 per cent a year.Africa is also expected to see strong growth of 5.1 per cent annually for a total market of 303 million passengers while Latin American markets will grow by 3.8 per cent annually to 658 million passengers.IATA has a roadmap to handle the growth called the Simplifying Business Program which includes initiatives to make airport and security checkpoints more efficient, provide customers with better real-time information and improve the way tickets are issued and itineraries recorded.Part of this is proposal called One Identity, which would mean passengers would need to prove their identity just once and eliminate the need for repeated ID checks.But whether the aviation industry and governments are capable of coping with the massive growth remains to be seen.De Juniac called for players in the air transport industry to work together to embrace “speed, innovation to meet the challenges of growth and rising passenger expectations’’.But he warned of problems with airport and airspace capacity, citing rising congestion in Europe and potential issues in the Gulf region and China.“I fear we may be headed for an infrastructure crisis that will impact air travellers,’’ he said. “Inadequate infrastructure negatively impacts the passenger experience in the form of flight delays, longer routes and inefficient schedules.“Then there is the cost to economies of lost business opportunities, employment and social development. Remember aviation is a critical catalyst for economic and social development, supporting 63 million jobs and some $2.7 trillion in economic impact.”IATA also released a survey of almost 7000 passengers which showed travellers wanted to do more of the traditional check-in processes before they arrive at airport and more than 70 percent now using online facilities.A big number wanted to travel to the airport luggage free, with 26 per cent wanting their luggage picked up at home and 24 per cent wanting to drop off their bags “off airport’’.Security and border control processes were seen as the biggest “pain points’’ and passengers were also keen to pass through security without having to remove personal items.  Four out of 10 chose their route based on their airport transfer experience.The survey found in-flight wi-fi had gained in popularity and more than half of passengers wanted to connect during their journey, up 12 per cent on 2015.Some 85 per cent also said they were prepared to share personal data to allow airlines and airports to offer them a more customised travel experience.last_img read more

The good guide to volunteering

first_imgThere are heaps of volunteering opportunities of all kinds available in South Africa, and GreaterGood provides a link between the cause and the giver.(Image: GreaterGood)MEDIA CONTACTS • GreaterGood SA+27 21 685 9780RELATED ARTICLES• Gift that keeps on giving• Citizen science to toads’ rescue• Fighting hunger on wheels• Community workers save the day• Pupils have a blast with Mathletes Source: GreaterGoodSouth Africa has a rich heritage of volunteerism and service to communities. Millions of South Africans, and overseas visitors too, serve as volunteers – from caring for ill neighbours to church work or coaching the local soccer team.These are the unsung heroes of our communities, working for little reward to build a better country.GreaterGood South Africa is a non-profit organisation that connects givers with good causes through its public campaigns and online community. The organisation also provides services and investment opportunities for corporate and public sector clients.GreaterGood has drawn up a list of points to follow for all volunteers and those wishing to join this group of big-hearted people.These are their top tips for being a great volunteer and a truly great South African:1. Be mindful of needIt’s great that you want to volunteer but remember that volunteering, while it can be hugely fulfilling, is not about you. It is about helping the cause to serve their beneficiaries better. Be mindful of what the cause actually needs and don’t be disappointed if they say: “no, thanks”. Some causes can’t take on volunteers, others will only consider long-term volunteers. Let them know you want to help and ask them what they need.2. Stick to your commitmentOnce you have made a commitment, stick to it. Causes rely on a particular number of volunteers turning up and if they don’t, the project often can’t go ahead. If you are working with vulnerable children, letting them down can be devastating. If you really can’t make it, let them know in good time so they can make other plans.3. Be on time and ready to workAs they say in the movie business, time is money. If you’re late, it can set a project back and perhaps even hamper its completion. Remember, staff time and resources are scarce at non profits so wasted time means wasted money for the cause. Wear sensible clothes and bring along something to drink and eat.4. Respect your environmentYou will find yourself in a variety of different environments. Be sensitive to the people and communities where you volunteer, particularly children, the elderly and those with disabilities. Be considerate of the organisation’s environment and their limited resources. When you bring along food and snacks, consider sharing these with the beneficiaries, if appropriate. For your own safety and the safety of beneficiaries, alcohol should never be consumed while volunteering.5. Follow the leaderThe organisation has prepared and planned for the volunteering activity. Follow their instructions to achieve what you set out to do in a fun, safe and respectful way. Some organisations struggle with resources and capacity and may sometimes appear not to be as prepared as they should be. You can help by using your leadership skills to support their efforts to manage the activity.6. Become a change agentBeing an agent for change is empowering. Use this opportunity to forge a lasting relationship with the cause you are supporting on the day and have a much greater impact on your community. Share your experience with others and encourage them to support the cause as well. Ongoing and regular financial support for causes is the very best, and most sustainable, way to make a difference in your community.7. Keep in touchDon’t be a stranger – if you can, keep in touch with the cause and connect with our giving community. This is where you will find updates on your cause’s progress, new causes to support and other good people with the same interest in making a difference.last_img read more

Rafael Nadal into French Open last 16 on 10th anniversary of Soderling shock

first_imgNadal maintained his record of never having lost in the first week in Paris, although he withdrew injured before the third round in 2016.He powered 38 winners past Goffin on Court Philippe Chatrier to set up a last-16 clash with either Argentinian Juan Ignacio Londero or home hope Corentin Moutet.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“David is a very good player. I started the match at a good level,” said Nadal. “After, in the third set, he played very well. I’m very happy to reach the last 16.”Goffin looked totally outclassed in the first two sets, but claimed his first-ever set against Nadal on clay, and the first the Spaniard had dropped at Roland Garros since last year’s quarter-final win against Diego Schwartzman. LATEST STORIES Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport View comments ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Spain’s Rafael Nadal celebrates winning his third round match of the French Open tennis tournament against Belgium’s David Goffin in four sets, 6-1, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3, at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Friday, May 31, 2019. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)Reigning champion Rafael Nadal survived a blip to continue his bid for a record-extending 12th French Open title on Friday with a four-set third-round win over David Goffin, ten years to the day since his shock 2009 exit to Robin Soderling.The 17-time Grand Slam winner bounced back after an excellent third set from Belgian 27th seed Goffin to win 6-1, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3 and take his incredible Roland Garros win-loss record to 89-2 — those two defeats coming against Soderling in the last 16 a decade ago and against Novak Djokovic in 2015.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too But Nadal refocused and clinched victory in the fourth set when Goffin fired a backhand wide after a single break of serve in game four.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice PLAY LIST 01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Kevin Durant still out for Game 2 of NBA Finalslast_img read more

Altidore mocks Trump s**thole comments

first_imgUnited States ‘Three s**thole dudes living the dream’ – Altidore responds to Trump comments Ben Valentine @bvalentine14 Last updated 1 year ago 06:28 1/14/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(13) Jozy Altidore Toronto FC Noah K. Murray United States Toronto MLS The U.S. international responded to Donald Trump’s controversial comments with a tweet showing himself, P.K. Subban and Usain Bolt Jozy Altidore has fired back at United States President Donald Trump over reported comments demeaning the countries and people of Africa, Haiti and El Salvador.Trump, during negotiations over immigration, was reported to have responded to a proposal to restore protections for people from those areas with a question of why the U.S. was allowing “all these people from s**thole countries” to immigrate.The comments have caused massive global outrage and charges of racism, as Trump followed up by asking why the U.S. doesn’t allow more people from places like Norway instead. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player And Altidore, who was born in New Jersey but is the son of Haitian immigrants, took to Twitter to post a direct response to the president, along with two other prominent black athletes.The Toronto FC striker posted a photo of himself, Nashville Predators star defenseman P.K. Subban and multi-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt with the caption: “Three s**thole dudes just living the dream, @realdonaldtrump.” Three #shithole dudes just living the dream, @realdonaldtrump. cc: @PKSubban1 @usainbolt pic.twitter.com/PPFZeyjNZ7— Jozy Altidore (@JozyAltidore) January 13, 2018Subban is Canadian and Bolt is Jamaican, but both are of African descent.Altidore has personally tried to assist Haiti in the past, helping in relief efforts following a massive 2010 earthquake, raising money for projects to bring more clean water to the country and donating to get every Haiti game in the 2016 Copa America broadcast on local television.While he directly called out Trump in his statement, Altidore is not the only athlete who appeared to take umbrage with the president in the last 24 hours. In his statement announcing his comeback with Liga MX club Leon, former U.S. international Landon Donovan tweeted: “I don’t believe in walls. I want to go to Mexico, wear green & win trophies with Leon. We’ll see each other very soon!”Donovan’s message is likely a reference to Trump’s long-running campaign promise to build a border wall to keep Mexican immigrants out of the U.S.last_img read more

Merchants of Alarming Truth and the Reality of Media Bias

first_imgAlong about New Year’s Eve, Sports Illustrated ran a piece on the firing of Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Dirk Koetter.“For the seventh time in eight years,” wrote Jonathan Jones, “the Bucs finished last in the NFC South, a level of ineptitude to which only the Browns can lay claim… At 5–11, the Buccaneers have missed the playoffs for the 11th consecutive year, and it’s the seventh time in that span that Tampa Bay has had double-digit losses.”“Ineptitude.” Ouch. That’s kind of… judgmental. But funny thing about what did not happen next. There were no howls about S.I.’s bias. Nobody questioned Jonathan Jones’ journalistic ethics or declared him the purveyor of Fake Sports News or castigated him as the Enemy of the Tampa-St, Petersburg-Clearwater metroplex.Because, objectively, the Buccaneers suck.Elsewhere on the meteorological disaster front, over the years the National Review has called Hurricane Katrina a “killer storm,” Newsweek called Cyclone Nargis a “killer storm” and Popular Mechanics called Hurricane Irma a “killer” storm. I don’t recall there being a trial verdict—in this country one is innocent until proven guilty—yet not a single accusation was forthcoming about the media’s anti-weather agenda. Evidently, the accuracy of the reporting spoke for itself.So now comes ex-New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson’s new book, “Merchants of Truth,” in which she concludes that the paper’s negative coverage of the Trump Administration violates the paper’s founding values and panders to its—she says—mainly liberal audience. It’s mainly a digression in her examination of the overall (treacherous) media landscape, but of course the right-wing-media-o-sphere swooped in like seagulls spying a stray boardwalk french fry. If you Google “jill abramson bias,” your tops hits will be: the New York Post, Realclearpolitics.com, Washington Times, Fox News, Russia Today (!) The Hill, and National Review.The liberal-bias narrative, after all, is their raison d’etre, their obsession and their business model. And it has been at the core of conservative politics since Nixon. But is it, you know, true? Is there a liberal bias in mainstream media? Yes. And, also, no.In the Venn diagram of values, journalism and liberalism do have a huge overlap. Questioning authority, suspicion of big money, “reform” in general, afflicting the comfortable and comforting the afflicted—which is really another way of saying “social justice.” Journalism isn’t a political party, much less an “opposition party,” but it is inherently progressive and inherently adversarial to the sitting government. Among recent victims: Barack Obama and Bill Clinton. And would-be president Hillary Clinton? Ask her. On the other hand, while the latest survey numbers are a bit outdated, in 2013 only 7 percent of journalists self-identified as Republican. (52 percent identified as independent). So the bleeding-heart sensibility is not a figment of the right’s imagination.But does that prove political bias? No, it does not.With some notable and horrifying exceptions, large news organizations—especially the ones dismissed as hubs of liberal bias—are rigorous in their work. Their publishing protocols police fairness and accuracy, and are difficult to circumvent within a newsroom. When a story is deemed particularly explosive, the caution is even greater. (Indeed, here the press tends toward the more insidious sin of false balance.) Nonetheless, when things happen, we report them, and when bad things happen we report them louder. That is not evidence of bias. It is evidence of observation and judgment.We have a president who told three bald-faced lies on his second day in office, one about the CIA, one about crowd size at his inauguration and one about the weather. Since then, fact checkers have documented thousands of presidential lies, falsehoods and misstatements. According to the Washington Post, in 2018, he made 15 false claims per day. Plus the schoolyard ad hominem against his critics. Plus his attacks on the press, the judiciary, the Congress, the intelligence community, the Justice Department and NATO. Plus his nakedly racist and unconstitutional statements and actions, blocked again and again by the courts. Plus his embrace of dictators in Russia, North Korea, Philippines and Turkey (and, this just in, now a fascist in Brazil). Plus his sleazy business conduct. Plus his sleazy “charity.” Plus his hidden tax returns. Plus his unabashed misogyny.These are all observable, and they are manifestly unique in the history of the presidency. This stuff is also not a figment of anyone’s imagination. The statements, the tweets, the insults, the executive orders, the firings, the defense of Charlottesville Nazis—they are all on the record and unfolding before our eyes. Yet when the media report on the wreckage, it’s seen as a smoking gun of bias and partisanship.Has the press piled on Donald Trump? Of course it has. For that you can blame Donald Trump. It is simply an eyewitness account of historic… hmm… I was going to say “depravity,” but let’s just go with ineptitude.Sarah Sanders wonders why we don’t report on Trump’s achievements, instead of focusing on Robert Mueller and Vladimir Putin and Stormy Daniels. Yeah, well, Dirk Koetter’s Tampa Bay offense gained more yards than any team in Bucs’ history. They still fired his ass.last_img read more

OBITUARY Mary Ellen Scelzo McIntire

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Mary Ellen (Scelzo) McIntire, of Wilmington, formerly of Tewksbury and Woburn, passed away on May 13, 2018.Beloved wife of the late Richard A. McIntire. Devoted mother of Mary Ellen O’Neil and her husband Thomas of Warren, RI, Michael McIntire and Cathy Whitten of Tewksbury, Louise Southmayd and her husband Thomas of Wilmington, Edna Peters and her husband David of Tewksbury, the late Richard A. McIntire Jr. Loving grandmother of Robert and Brian Surran, Amy Talbot, Michael O’Neil, Deborah Burtt, Richard McIntire, David Peters Jr., and the late Linda Peters. Loving great grandmother of Anthony and Laci Burtt, Owen and Jacqueline O’Neil, Audrey and Jack Talbot, Jason and Joshua Surran and Matthew Peters. Sister of Louise Garland of LaPalma, CA and the late Joseph Scelzo. Also survived by several nieces, nephews and many extended family members.Funeral from the McLaughlin-Dello Russo Funeral Home, 60 Pleasant St., WOBURN, Friday, May 18th, at 9 a.m. followed by a funeral mass celebrated in St. Anthony Church, 851 Main St., Woburn, at 10 a.m. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend. Visiting hours will be held on Thursday from 4 to 8 p.m. Services will conclude with burial at Calvary Cemetery, Woburn. Memorial contributions may be made in Mary Ellen’s memory to the Linda Peters Memorial Scholarship Fund, 940 Main St. #18, Tewksbury, MA 01876.Mary Ellen McIntire(NOTE: The above obituary is from McLaughlin-Dello Russo Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Pauline F. (Lascelles) Capps, 86In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Marie J. (Ciampa) Cummings, 81In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Thomas F. Connolly, 86In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Apple defends controversial battery certification warning message

first_img $999 $999 Originally published on Aug. 8 at 3:08 a.m. PTUpdate, Aug. 14: Adds Apple comment and information. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. 8:10 Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier See it • Apple iPhone XS Best Buy Tags $999 That realization caused outcry and allegations that Apple is “locking iPhone batteries to discourage repair,” as iFixit put it. “Apple is effectively announcing a drastic new policy: only Apple batteries can go in iPhones, and only they can install them,” the site said. But Apple on Wednesday defended the move, saying it displays the message to keep customers safe and make sure battery replacements are done properly. “Last year we introduced a new feature to notify customers if we were unable to verify that a new, genuine battery was installed by a certified technician following Apple repair processes,” the company said in a statement. “This information is there to help protect our customers from damaged, poor quality or used batteries, which can lead to safety or performance issues. This notification does not impact the customer’s ability to use the phone after an unauthorized repair.”People are holding onto their smartphones longer than before, and for many, the battery is one of the biggest reasons to eventually upgrade. Being able to monitor the battery’s health, and cheaply replace it, lets people wait longer to buy newer models. Apple’s iPhone battery practices have drawn scrutiny in the past. In late 2017, the company admitted that software it released the previous year slowed down iPhones to offset problems with their aging lithium ion batteries. As batteries get older, they don’t hold their charges as well as newer batteries, and they can have worse problems when the charge is low or the temperature is cold. Apple ended up releasing new features to help iPhone owners monitor their batteries, and it offered a short-term, 63% discount on its battery replacement program.Battery healthThe warning message, which is found in the iPhone’s settings, usually indicates that your battery is degraded and must be replaced, iFixit said. The publication’s tests revealed that even a brand-new, genuine Apple battery caused the message to appear. It appears on iPhones running iOS 12 and the iOS 13 beta.iphone-battery-healthIf you replace your iPhone battery on your own, you won’t be able to monitor the battery’s health.  Apple The update won’t throttle the battery’s performance or prevent you from using your phone, but you won’t be able to see details of your battery’s health. The site compared this to a car displaying a Check Oil light that only a Ford dealership can get rid of.The only way to get rid of the message is to have an Apple Genius or an Apple Authorized Service Provider authenticate it — essentially forcing you to take the battery through official channels.Apple has over 1,800 authorized service providers across the US, including all Best Buy stores, and 5,000 around the globe. In a support page about batteries, the company noted that if the message appears, you should contact an authorized service provider to have the iPhone checked. “We take the safety of our customers very seriously and want to make sure any battery replacement is done properly,” Apple said in its statement Wednesday.  Sprint Apple wants you to make iPhone battery replacements through official channels, to ensure the battery’s safety. Angela Lang/CNET A teardown specialist said Apple is making it hard to replace your own iPhone batteries. But the tech giant on Wednesday defended how it authenticates the batteries used in its iPhones, saying it’s the only way to ensure they meet its standards.Starting with iOS 12.1 from October 2018, Apple included the ability to monitor the health of your iPhone XS, XS Max and XR battery. By going into settings, you can see the maximum capacity your battery is able to charge and whether it supports normal peak performance. You can also see if you should replace your battery.But if you swap your battery yourself or go to a nonauthorized vendor, you’ll see a Service message that warns Apple is unable to verify if your iPhone has a genuine Apple battery, as noted last week by teardown specialist iFixit. You can still replace your battery, but you won’t be able to monitor the health of the battery unless you’re using one from Apple or an authorized reseller.  Now playing: Watch this: Commentscenter_img $999 See It 17 Share your voice reading • Apple defends controversial battery certification warning message Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it See All Boost Mobile Apple See It Three new iPhone 11 models coming in September, rumor… See It Phones Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demand Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X iOS 13 iOS 12 Applelast_img read more

By hook crook and ballot – Democracy the loser

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina speaks to reporters after casting her vote in parliamentary elections in Dhaka, on Sunday.—Photo: APBangladesh Awami League’s election victory with a margin of victory at 96 per cent “was a result one might expect in a place like North Korea, not a democratic nation such as Bangladesh”, writes The Washington Post.That is, according to the US newspaper, exactly the problem: prime minister Sheikh Hasina “consolidated her grip on power but at the cost of her own electoral legitimacy.”Her party and its allies secured 288 out of 299 contested seats. The opposition BNP, which won only seven, has called the election “farcical” and demanded a do-over, TIME magazine mentioned in an article ‘They Threaten Everyone’, adding that Sheikh Hasina’s “landslide win in Bangladesh marred by voter suppression”.The Economist wrote, “… the embarrassingly skewed tally suggested that the BNP was not really the biggest loser. The biggest loss was for democracy itself.”It observed that the flawed general election of 30 December represented a sharp reversion to the less democratic end of the spectrum. “The Awami League, which has been in power continuously for 10 years, flagrantly wielded the full power of state institutions,” the British magazine said in a piece “By hook, crook and ballot”.TIME magazine cited an example of voting in Dhaka on 30 December, quoting a polls worker who tried to defend disruption in voting as “Lunch break”. But by 3.10pm, the explanation had changed. “We’ve already started to count,” a policeman was quoted to have said. The polls had been supposed to close at 4pm.It also pointed out that the result of AL’s landslide victory has been clouded by pre-election violence and allegations of a crackdown on the opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP), as well as widespread reports of vote-rigging and intimidation on election day, some of which was observed by TIME on the ground.The Washington Post reported that there were scattered reports of irregularities at polling stations, including possible vote tampering, “but observers said Hasina had used other means to tilt the field in her favour long before Sunday.”Nazrul Islam Khan, a standing committee leader of the BNP, told TIME that “the extent to which the government has rigged these elections is beyond imagination.”The AL chief, Hasina, rejected all allegations of impropriety, at a briefing with journalists and election observers on Monday evening. Her advisor HT Imam was said to have called it “one of the best elections held ever.”Evidence of voter disruption was widespread, said TIME. At one polling station at Kabi Nazrul Islam College in Old Dhaka, TIME was reportedly harassed by dozens of government supporters and forced to delete a video showing a woman who got into a fight with poll workers.It wasn’t just BNP supporters who claimed they were prevented from voting. “I wanted to vote for the Awami League anyway, but when I reached the polling station they told me my vote had already been cast,” said one woman who asked TIME not to publish her name for fear of reprisals.The Economist said the sweeping nature of the repression meant that on voting day, few of the BNP’s electoral agents — who guide voters and monitor the process — dared show up at the 40,000 polling stations. By contrast, the Awami League fielded 120,000 agents. In Dhaka, the capital, it was hard to find a single poster for the BNP among the tens of thousands boosting the Awami League, the magazine said.The sweeping nature of Hasina’s victory raises “serious doubt” about the fairness of the election, the Post quoted Ataur Rahman, president of the Bangladesh Political Scientist Association, as saying. He added that the opposition’s tiny number of seats also means there will be no mechanism for political accountability.Hasina, according to the newspaper, is also viewed by some — including in neighbouring India — as an ally against the potential spread of Islamist extremism in Bangladesh.After Sunday’s election, Bangladesh has become a “one-party democracy,” Kanchan Gupta, a political commentator in New Delhi, was quoted to have written. Hasina “faces no opposition worth its name.”“Why should Sheikh Hasina pull out so many stops to ensure a victory that most observers had assumed was in the bag in any case?” wrote The Economist, adding that opinion polls had universally shown a solid advantage for the Awami League.The magazine observed that Sheikh Hasina seems to bear a personal grudge against perceived enemies, which springs both from the murder of her family members including Bangabandhu Sheikh Mijibur Rahman in 1975 and from an attempt on her own life that has allegedly been tied to figures in the BNP.Some of the ruling party’s rivals were quoted to have suggested that the AL needs to cling to power to cover its own corruption.TIME quoted Bangladeshi editors and journalists as saying that it’s increasingly difficult to publish news that embarrasses the government. Some estimate they self-censor at least two-thirds of their stories. “I am not sure if I want to stay in this country now that the Awami League will feel even more entitled to stifle dissent,” one TV journalist, who wished to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation, was quoted to have said.And on social media, it reported, criticism of the government is carefully shrouded in irony. “Can someone please tell me if my vote was already cast? Then I don’t have to get out of bed this morning,” a law student posted on Facebook on election day.TIME referred to a BNP activist, Mozammal Hossain, one of a dozen BNP activists who were documenting fraud, arrests, voter harassment and violence during these elections, as saying that his parents were recently harassed by police for their son’s work. “They threaten everyone,” he was quoted to have said.last_img read more