MEMA Encourages Residents To Stay Safe During Extreme Heat

first_imgHeat stroke is the most serious heat emergency and is life-threatening. Heat stroke develops when systems in the body begin to stop functioning due to extreme heat. Heat stroke may cause brain damage or death if the body is not cooled quickly.Symptoms: Extremely high body temperature, hot and red skin (dry or moist), loss of consciousness, changes in level of responsiveness rapid and weak pulse, rapid and shallow breathing, vomiting, confusion, and/or seizuresTreatment: A person suffering from heat stroke needs immediate assistance. Call 9-1-1 and move the person to a cooler place. Immerse the individual in a cool bath, wrap in cold wet sheets, or cover the person in bags of ice. FRAMINGHAM, MA — Below is an extreme heat advisory from the Massachusetts Emergency Management agency:Hot temperatures combined with high humidity levels are expected to create dangerous heat conditions, with the most oppressive conditions expected Saturday. High temperatures Friday-Sunday are forecast to be in the 90s to lower 100s, and dew points in the low to mid 70s. Heat index values are expected to reach the mid to upper 90s Friday, 100 to 110 Saturday, and 97 to 105 Sunday, with the highest values occurring on Saturday in eastern Massachusetts and parts of the Connecticut River valley. The hot temperatures and high heat indices can lead to serious heat related-illnesses.“MEMA urges residents to take precautions during the upcoming extreme heat. Never leave children or pets alone in a closed vehicle, find an air-conditioned public space, cooling center, or other cool spot for relief, and watch for heat-related illnesses,” said Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) Director Samantha Phillips. “Please check on your family, friends, or neighbors to make sure they are safe during the extreme heat.”Extreme Heat Safety TipsNever leave children or pets alone in a closed vehicle. Even with the windows cracked open, interior temperatures can rise almost 20°F within 10 minutes.Slow down and avoid strenuous activity.Drink plenty of fluids — even if you are not thirsty. Avoid alcoholic beverages and liquids high in sugar or caffeine. If your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink, ask how much you should drink during hot weather.Wear lightweight, loose-fitting, light-colored clothing. Light colors reflect heat and sunlight, and help maintain normal body temperature.Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun. Do not leave pets outside for extended periods of time.If you must be outdoors, limit your outdoor activity to the morning and evening hours. Try to rest often in shady areas so your body temperature will have a chance to recover. Use sunscreen with a high SPF and wear a wide-brimmed hat.If you do not have air conditioning, stay on your lowest floor, out of the sun. Use fans to stay cool and avoid using your stove and oven. Consider spending time in air-conditioned public spaces, such as schools, libraries, theaters, and other community facilities.Check with your local authorities or Call 2-1-1 to find locations of cooling centers or shelters near you.On hot days, more people cool off around bodies of water. Playing in and around water can increase the risk of drowning. Learn how to keep yourself and your children safe in and around water with these Water Safety Tips.If there are power outages during warm weather, you may need to take additional precautions or go to a cooling center or emergency shelter to stay cool.Know the symptoms of and watch out for heat-related illnesses. Call 9-1-1 to report emergencies.Be a good neighbor. Check on family, friends, and neighbors, especially the elderly, those who live alone, those with medical conditions, those who may need additional assistance, and those who may not have air conditioning.Types of Heat-related IllnessesDuring extreme heat, people are susceptible to heat-related illnesses. Learn how to recognize and respond to them:Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms caused by heavy sweating.Symptoms: Muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomenTreatment: Get the person to rest in a comfortable position in a cooler place. Give the person water or fluids with electrolytes help them rehydrate. For more information on heat-related illnesses and graphics, see https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/warning.htmlMEMA is the state agency charged with ensuring the state is prepared to withstand, respond to, and recover from all types of emergencies and disasters, including natural hazards, accidents, deliberate attacks, and technological and infrastructure failures. MEMA’s staff of professional planners, communications specialists and operations and support personnel is committed to an all hazards approach to emergency management. By building and sustaining effective partnerships with federal, state and local government agencies, and with the private sector – individuals, families, non-profits and businesses – MEMA ensures the Commonwealth’s ability to rapidly recover from large and small disasters by assessing and mitigating threats and hazards, enhancing preparedness, ensuring effective response, and strengthening our capacity to rebuild and recover. For additional information about MEMA and Emergency Preparedness, go to www.mass.gov/mema.Continue to follow MEMA updates on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MassEMA; Facebook at www.facebook.com/MassachusettsEMA; YouTube at www.youtube.com/MassachusettsEMA.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. Heat exhaustion typically occurs when people overexert themselves in a warm, humid place, and often affects those doing strenuous work in hot weather. Body fluids are lost through heavy sweating and blood flow to the skin increases, causing blood flow to vital organs to decrease. This results in a form of mild shock.Symptoms:  Cool, moist, pale or flushed skin, nausea, dizziness, headache, weakness, and/or exhaustionTreatment: Get the person to rest in a comfortable position in a cooler place. Remove or loosen tight clothing and apply cool, wet cloths, such as towels or sheets. If the person is conscious, give them half a glass of cool water or fluids with electrolytes every 15 minutes, making sure the person drinks slowly. Watch the person carefully for changes in his or her condition and call 9-1-1 if it doesn’t improve. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedMEMA Encourages Residents To Stay Safe During Extreme Cold WeatherIn “Government”Governor Baker Proclaims This Week As ‘Hurricane Preparedness Week’In “Government”RMLD Asks Residents To Conserve Energy During This Weekend’s Heat WaveIn “Government”last_img read more

Digital photography begins its next chapter with radical changes

first_img Walmart Share your voice Why we need 16 cameras on a smartphone $849 Apple $589 30 See All $812 Stuart Palley, a professional wildfire photographer here standing in the Angeles National Forest, believes mirrorless cameras will replace conventional SLRs. Stuart Palley Digital photography has changed a lot over the past two decades, with clunky DSLRs giving way to sleek smartphones. Over the next 10 years, expect a similar evolution as the science behind the art changes. Much of the technology in use today represents the breakthroughs of the first generation of digital cameras. Film was stripped away and digital image sensors took its place, but much of the rest of the camera — things like lenses, shutters, autofocus systems — often stayed largely the same. Manufacturers centered camera designs on the single, fleeting snap of the shutter. Now two big trends are reshaping our expectations of digital photography. Computational photography, which uses computing technology to improve photos, vaults over the limits of smartphone camera hardware to produce impressive shots. And the “mirrorless” movement, which drops hardware once necessary for film and elevates the image sensor’s importance, overhauls the mechanics of traditional cameras. Old assumptions about optics are being reconsidered — or discarded — as computer processing takes over. “Cameras will change more in the next 10 years than in the past 10,” said Lau Nørgaard, vice president of research and development at Phase One, a Danish company that makes ultra-premium 151-megapixel medium-format cameras costing $52,000 apiece. See It Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Best Buy The changes will matter to all of us, not simply professional photographers on fashion shoots. New technology will mean better everyday snapshots and new creative possibilities for enthusiasts. Everything — selfies, landscapes and family portraits — will simply look better. Computational photography For much of camera history, bigger meant better. A larger frame of film could capture more image detail, but that meant a bigger camera body. Bigger lenses offered more detail, but that meant more weight. Computational photography, which runs on powerful processors, will change that paradigm. And that’s good news because most of us rely on our phones for taking pictures. Perhaps some of the most advanced computational photography available now is in Google’s Pixel 3 phone, which arrived in October. Here’s some of what it can do: Combine up to nine frames into a single shot with a technology called HDR+ that captures details in both dark shadows and bright highlights. Monitor how much your hands shake the photo so it can snap shots during fleeting moments of stillness. Compare multiple shots of photos to find the ones where people aren’t blinking or suffering from awkward facial expressions. Brighten the parts of the image where it detects humans and slightly smooths skin to make subjects look better. Zoom in better by capturing more data about the scene from multiple shots and and using artificial intelligence technology that predicts how best to expand an image. Photograph in dim conditions by merging multiple shots through a technology called Night Sight. Isaac Reynolds, Google’s Pixel camera product manager, says his company’s product underscores a fundamental change in what we think cameras are. Much of the Pixel 3’s performance and features come not from the lens and sensor but from software running on the phone’s chip that processes and combines multiple frames into one photo. With a computational photography feature called Night Sight, Google's $900 Pixel 3 smartphone can take a photo that challenges a shot from a $4,000 Canon 5D Mark IV SLR.Enlarge ImageWith a computational photography feature called Night Sight, Google’s $900 Pixel 3 smartphone can take a photo that challenges a shot from a $4,000 Canon 5D Mark IV SLR, below. The Canon’s larger sensor outperforms the phone’s, but the phone combines several shots to reduce noise and improve color. Stephen Shankland/CNET “You’re seeing a redefinition of what a camera is,” Reynolds said. “The Pixel 3 is one of the most software-based cameras in the world.” Seeing in 3D It’s all pretty radical compared with a shutter flipping open for a moment so photons can change the chemistry of film. And it’s only the beginning. Two years ago, the iPhone 7 started using two cameras side by side, which lets the phone judge just how far away each element of the scene is. The phone’s computing hardware then constructs a 3D-infused layer of information called a “depth map” in which each pixel of a photo holds both color and spatial information. Initially, Apple used the technology to re-create a style used in portrait photography that requires expensive camera lenses. Those lenses could shoot a shallow depth of field that focused on the subject but left the background an undistracting blur. Apple used software to do the blurring. The depth map has more to offer. With Lightroom, Adobe’s widely used photo editing and cataloging software, you now can adjust an iPhone photo based on that 3D information. For example, you can selectively brighten shadowed subjects in the foreground while leaving a bright background unchanged. That’s a manual process photo enthusiasts will appreciate, but it should help smartphones take photos automatically, said Google distinguished engineer Marc Levoy, who coined the term “computational photography” in 2004 when he was at Stanford University. A camera that could generate reliable depth maps means a camera app could fix problems with brightness and color balance so photos look more natural. “We have just begun to scratch the surface with what computational photography and AI have done to improve the basic single-press picture taking,” Levoy said. This photo, shot with Adobe Lightroom on an iPhone XS Max, contains "depth map" information about how far away elements of the scene are. That lets you easily select foreground areas for brightening.This photo, shot with Adobe Lightroom on an iPhone XS Max, contains “depth map” information about how far away elements of the scene are. That lets you easily select foreground areas for brightening. Stephen Shankland/CNET Goodbye, SLRs Generations of photographers grew up using SLRs — short for single lens reflex. It’s named after its reflex mirror that bounces light from the lens into a viewfinder so you can compose a shot. When you take the photo, the mirror flips out of the way and the shutter opens to let light reach the film. The first serious digital cameras — DSLRs — replaced the film with an image sensor and memory card. But they left almost everything else the same — the mirror and viewfinder, the autofocus system, the mount for interchangeable lenses. Now mirrorless cameras are changing that setup, dumping the mirror and optical viewfinder. You compose your shots using a screen. It might be the screen on the back of the camera or a smaller electronic viewfinder you use like a film-era photographer. With mirrorless cameras, the sensor is recording nonstop. It’s essentially taking a video but throwing away most of the data, except when you push a button and pluck out a single frame. Indeed, this video-centric design makes mirrorless cameras adept at video. What’s so great about mirrorless designs? They offer smaller, lighter camera bodies that can shoot photos silently; use autofocus across the frame, not just in the central portion; make it easier to compose shots at night; shoot fast bursts of photos; and preview shots more accurately through an electronic viewfinder so you can do better dialing in exposure, focus and aperture. “There’s none of this dropping the camera down, looking at the image and seeing if it’s too bright or dark,” said wildlife photographer David Shaw, who sold his Canon gear to move to Panasonic’s Lumix G9 camera, which is smaller and a quarter the weight. “I can see it all as I’m shooting.” Canon and Nikon embrace mirrorless Mirrorless cameras have been gaining traction for years, but here’s what changed in 2018: Canon and Nikon. The two DSLR heavy hitters, still the top dogs of the traditional photography market, started selling high-end mirrorless models. Nikon’s Z7 and Z6 and Canon’s EOS R. Following Sony’s lead, they come with large “full-frame” sensors that are best at capturing color and light data. Nikon and Canon aren’t phasing out their traditional SLRs, but their mirrorless models will be peers. Meanwhile, mirrorless pioneer Panasonic joined in with plans for two full-frame models debuting in 2019. Nikon's $3,400 Z7 looks similar to traditional DSLR cameras but dumps the internal mirror in a move to a more purely digital design.Nikon’s $3,400 Z7 looks similar to traditional DSLR cameras but dumps the internal mirror in a move to a more purely digital design. Nikon Mirrorless is the future, says Stuart Palley, a Newport Beach, California, professional photographer whose specialty in wildfire photography appears in his new book Terra Flamma. “DSLRs are going the way of medium formats and Speed Graphics,” Palley said, referring to film-era camera designs that now are mostly footnotes in history. He’s begun shooting with a Nikon Z7 and likes how it’s lighter than his Nikon D850 DSLR. “It’s so liberating carrying around less,” Palley said. The Z7, like the Sony and Panasonic full-frame mirrorless models, also can move its image sensor to compensate for shaky hands — something utterly impossible with film. “I can shoot a handheld image of the Milky Way now. It’s crazy,” Palley said. Outpaced by phone innovation? The traditional camera makers are adapting. But will they adapt fast enough? There’s nothing in principle that stops them from using the same computational photography techniques that smartphone makers do, but so far that’s been a secondary priority. “The camera guys have to look at what’s going on with handsets and computational photography and see what’s’ adaptable to traditional cameras,” said Ed Lee, a Keypoint Intelligence analyst. He expects the pace of change in photography technology to increase. The phone makers are moving fast, but Phase One’s Nørgaard doesn’t see any problem embracing their technology. Indeed, the company has begun embedding its Capture One editing software directly into the camera body. “The cellphones make really good images from a small camera,” Nørgaard said. “We can do the same on the other end, where we start with an absolutely fantastic image. The software approach will push that even further.” But smartphones have gobbled up the point-and-shoot camera market and each year pick up more high-end camera abilities. Phones that sell by the tens of millions offer a huge incentive for chipmakers like Qualcomm to push photography technology. The company’s next-gen mobile chip, the Snapdragon 855, adds all kinds of photo smarts, like the ability to detect, identify and track objects in a scene, to create depth maps and to counteract shaky hands. And that’s just next year’s chip, said P.J. Jacobowitz, Qualcomm’s senior marketing manager for camera and computer vision. “In this book, there are about 50 chapters,” he said of digital photography tech. “We are in chapter two.” CNET’s Holiday Gift Guide: The place to find the best tech gifts for 2018. Cambridge Analytica: Everything you need to know about Facebook’s data mining scandal. Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 See It Review • Pixel 3 review: The best Android phone of 2018 Sep 1 • 7 phones with the best battery life: iPhone XR, Note 10 Plus and more Mentioned Above Google Pixel 3 (64GB, not pink)center_img Now playing: Watch this: 2:02 News • Unlocked Google Pixel 3: Just $499.99 with this exclusive code Preview • Pixel 3 and 3 XL: Google’s nicest Pixel might lack that killer feature $799 Tags See it CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Mobile Photography Cameras Sprint See It Comments • reading • Digital photography begins its next chapter with radical changes Google Pixel 3 Qualcomm Canon Google Nikon Panasonic Sony Applelast_img read more

Apple defends controversial battery certification warning message

first_img $999 $999 Originally published on Aug. 8 at 3:08 a.m. PTUpdate, Aug. 14: Adds Apple comment and information. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. 8:10 Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier See it • Apple iPhone XS Best Buy Tags $999 That realization caused outcry and allegations that Apple is “locking iPhone batteries to discourage repair,” as iFixit put it. “Apple is effectively announcing a drastic new policy: only Apple batteries can go in iPhones, and only they can install them,” the site said. But Apple on Wednesday defended the move, saying it displays the message to keep customers safe and make sure battery replacements are done properly. “Last year we introduced a new feature to notify customers if we were unable to verify that a new, genuine battery was installed by a certified technician following Apple repair processes,” the company said in a statement. “This information is there to help protect our customers from damaged, poor quality or used batteries, which can lead to safety or performance issues. This notification does not impact the customer’s ability to use the phone after an unauthorized repair.”People are holding onto their smartphones longer than before, and for many, the battery is one of the biggest reasons to eventually upgrade. Being able to monitor the battery’s health, and cheaply replace it, lets people wait longer to buy newer models. Apple’s iPhone battery practices have drawn scrutiny in the past. In late 2017, the company admitted that software it released the previous year slowed down iPhones to offset problems with their aging lithium ion batteries. As batteries get older, they don’t hold their charges as well as newer batteries, and they can have worse problems when the charge is low or the temperature is cold. Apple ended up releasing new features to help iPhone owners monitor their batteries, and it offered a short-term, 63% discount on its battery replacement program.Battery healthThe warning message, which is found in the iPhone’s settings, usually indicates that your battery is degraded and must be replaced, iFixit said. The publication’s tests revealed that even a brand-new, genuine Apple battery caused the message to appear. It appears on iPhones running iOS 12 and the iOS 13 beta.iphone-battery-healthIf you replace your iPhone battery on your own, you won’t be able to monitor the battery’s health.  Apple The update won’t throttle the battery’s performance or prevent you from using your phone, but you won’t be able to see details of your battery’s health. The site compared this to a car displaying a Check Oil light that only a Ford dealership can get rid of.The only way to get rid of the message is to have an Apple Genius or an Apple Authorized Service Provider authenticate it — essentially forcing you to take the battery through official channels.Apple has over 1,800 authorized service providers across the US, including all Best Buy stores, and 5,000 around the globe. In a support page about batteries, the company noted that if the message appears, you should contact an authorized service provider to have the iPhone checked. “We take the safety of our customers very seriously and want to make sure any battery replacement is done properly,” Apple said in its statement Wednesday.  Sprint Apple wants you to make iPhone battery replacements through official channels, to ensure the battery’s safety. Angela Lang/CNET A teardown specialist said Apple is making it hard to replace your own iPhone batteries. But the tech giant on Wednesday defended how it authenticates the batteries used in its iPhones, saying it’s the only way to ensure they meet its standards.Starting with iOS 12.1 from October 2018, Apple included the ability to monitor the health of your iPhone XS, XS Max and XR battery. By going into settings, you can see the maximum capacity your battery is able to charge and whether it supports normal peak performance. You can also see if you should replace your battery.But if you swap your battery yourself or go to a nonauthorized vendor, you’ll see a Service message that warns Apple is unable to verify if your iPhone has a genuine Apple battery, as noted last week by teardown specialist iFixit. You can still replace your battery, but you won’t be able to monitor the health of the battery unless you’re using one from Apple or an authorized reseller.  Now playing: Watch this: Commentscenter_img $999 See It 17 Share your voice reading • Apple defends controversial battery certification warning message Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it See All Boost Mobile Apple See It Three new iPhone 11 models coming in September, rumor… See It Phones Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demand Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X iOS 13 iOS 12 Applelast_img read more