OBITUARY Peter J Michals III 80

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Peter J. Michals III of Tewksbury passed away peacefully after a brief illness on July 19. He was 80 years old.He was born and grew up in East Cambridge, graduated from Rindge Technical School and Cambridge High and Latin. An altar boy in his youth, Peter was a devout Catholic all of his life, and attended Mass each week as a parishioner at St. Williams Church. At age 19, he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force and served from 1957 to 1960. He was a member of the Air Police and was stationed in Germany and France. He often recalled his service and the traveling he did with the Air Force as among his fondest memories. When he returned from service abroad, he married his sweetheart, Camille Samaria (Michals), who waited for him. Together, they had three children.Peter attended and held degrees from Boston University, Lowell Tech, and Lowell State University, now UMass Lowell. He was a caring family man who worked as an accountant and had a small tax preparation business until his retirement a few years ago. He loved his family, enjoyed playing sports with his son, and spent 15 years as a volunteer coach for Tewksbury Little League baseball. He was also a member of the Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks.He is survived by his beloved wife of 57 years, Camille; daughter Debra Michals and son-in-law Mark Antinoro of Newburyport; son Peter and daughter-in-law Kelly Curley of Contoocook, NH; grandson Cori Michals and granddaughter Ashley Michals of New Hampshire; step-grandchildren Sarah Antinoro and Melanie Antinoro of Acton, MA, and Casey Curley of Pensacola, FL.; his sister Janet Tosto of Tewksbury; and many nieces and nephews. His was predeceased by a daughter, Camille Marie “Camie.”Memorial Visiting hours will be on Wednesday, July 25, from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. at Tewksbury Funeral Home, corner of 1 Dewey and 975 Main Sts. (Rte. 38) TEWKSBURY CENTER, followed by a Memorial Funeral Mass at 11:30 a.m. in St. Williams Church, 1351 Main St. (Rte. 38) Tewksbury. Burial will follow at St. Mary Cemetery, No. Tewksbury. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Dept. 142, Memphis, TN 38148-0142 or visit http://www.stjude.org. Peter’s family would like to extend their gratitude to the caring staff of Woodbriar Health Center in Wilmington.Peter J. Michals III(NOTE: The above obituary is from the Tewksbury Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Elizabeth J. “Betty” (Kilpatrick) Valente, 75In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Donald R. Donahue, 80In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Brandon M. Long, 27In “Obituaries”last_img read more

SENIOR CENTER SPOTLIGHT Register Of Deeds Richard Howe To Hold Homestead Seminar

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Register of Deeds Richard P. Howe Jr. will present a free Homestead Seminar on Thursday, October 11, 2018 at 1:00pm at the Wilmington Senior Center (15 School Street).Recording a Declaration of Homestead at the Registry of Deeds protects your home from creditors. Register Howe will explain how this valuable law works and will have blank Homestead forms for anyone who wishes to file one (the recording fee is $35, cash or check). He will also discuss and answer questions about common real estate issues such as trusts, joint ownership of property, and mortgages.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Middlesex North Register of Deeds Richard Howe.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedRichard Howe Seeks Re-Election To Keep Improving Middlesex North Registry Of DeedsIn “Government”LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Vote Karen Cassella For Middlesex North Register Of DeedsIn “Letter To The Editor”40 Properties Sold In Wilmington In AugustIn “Business”last_img read more

515 Bangladeshis held in Malaysia

first_imgA total of 1,035 illegal immigrants, including 515 Bangladeshis, were detained in Malaysia in the first day of a nationwide operation to crack down on illegal foreign workers following the passing of the E-Card registration deadline, reported Malaysia based daily The Star on Sunday.Immigration director-general Datuk Seri Mustafar Ali said, enforcement officers inspected 155 premises across Malaysia, screening 3,393 people, it added.Of those rounded up, he said the majority were from Bangladesh at 515, followed by Indonesia (135), Myanmar (102), the Philippines (50), Thailand (five) and Vietnam (two).The rest were from other countries, he said, adding that those detained included 101 women and three children.“The 16 employers were held for hiring and harbouring illegal foreigners,” he said, adding that Johor had the highest number of those caught, followed by Kelantan.last_img read more

Zika outbreak in Miami prompts travel warning

first_img<< Previous PostNext Post >> Tags: Florida, Miami, Travel Alert, Zika MIAMI — In a highly unusual travel warning, health officials advised pregnant women to avoid a part of Miami where mosquitoes are apparently transmitting Zika directly to humans.Health officials last Friday announced that mosquitoes have apparently started spreading Zika on the U.S. mainland, citing four cases they strongly believe were caused by bites. Ten more cases were announced Monday, even though Florida authorities have yet to find any mosquitoes actually carrying the virus.Of the 14 people infected, two are women and 12 are men. Eight patients showed symptoms of Zika, which can include fever, rash, joint pain and red eyes. The others had no symptoms. The disease is often so mild that most people don’t know they are infected.All 14 cases are thought to have occurred in Miami’s Wynwood arts district, a trendy, fast-gentrifying neighbourhood of warehouses, art galleries, restaurants and boutiques.Rosemary LeBranch was doing laundry in Wynwood when health officials came to her house a few days ago and took urine samples from her, her daughter and her father. Her father, Gabriel Jean, tested positive for Zika, she said Monday.He had already spoken with a doctor and was advised to wear long shirts and pants outdoors.“He said nothing hurts; he doesn’t have any pain. He doesn’t feel anything,” she said.More than 1,650 cases of Zika have been reported in U.S. states. Nearly all have been the result of travel to a Zika-stricken country or sex with someone who was infected abroad, but now more than a dozen people have been infected in the U.S.Florida health officials said they have tested more than 200 people in Miami-Dade and Broward counties since early July. An emergency response team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will help Florida authorities investigate the outbreak, collect samples and control mosquitoes.More news:  Beep, beep! Transat hits the streets with Cubamania truckScott asked for a CDC emergency team to help Florida combat Zika, which has been sweeping Latin America and the Caribbean in recent months and now may be gaining a long-dreaded foothold in the U.S. The White House said a team will be sent quickly.“We will continue to keep our residents and visitors safe utilizing constant surveillance and aggressive strategies, such as increased mosquito spraying, that have allowed our state to fight similar viruses,” Florida Gov. Rick Scott said in a statement Monday.Government health officials warned pregnant women Monday to avoid the Zika-stricken part of Miami and told couples who have been there recently to put off having children for at least two months, after the number of people feared infected through mosquito bites in the U.S. climbed to 14.The CDC also said expectant mothers should get tested for the virus if they have visited the neighbourhood since mid-June.Jordan Davison and Melissa Felix work for a cruise line and were enjoying their day off Monday looking at Wynwood’s spray-painted murals.“It’s not like a big thing, right?” the 25-year-old Davidson said. “It’s kind of freaky. There’s so much going on we didn’t know, didn’t really think about it. … I might wear bug spray going forward.”CDC officials said they could not remember another time in the 70-year history of the disease-fighting agency when it told members of the public not to travel someplace in the U.S.Zika infections in pregnant women can cause severe brain-related birth defects, including extremely small skulls. The global outbreak has led to more than 1,800 serious defects.More news:  Hotel charges Bollywood star $8.50 for two bananas and the Internet has thoughtsThe virus can linger in the blood and urine for weeks and has been found in sperm for months. As a result, the CDC said men and women who have recently been in the affected area should wait at least eight weeks before trying to conceive a child. And men who have had symptoms of Zika should wait at least six months, the CDC said.The travel warning covers an area of about one square mile in Wynwood to the east of Interstate 95 and south of I-195. It’s large enough, health officials said, to provide a buffer around the suspected hot zone. The tropical mosquito that spreads Zika travels less than 200 yards in its lifetime.Dr. Peter Hotez, a tropical medicine expert at the Baylor College of Medicine in Texas, said the CDC should be more cautious and expand the travel advisory to all of Miami-Dade County.“If you’re pregnant or think you might be pregnant, avoid travel to Miami, and possibly elsewhere in South Florida,” he said. “I’m guessing most women who are pregnant are doing that. I don’t think they’re sitting around waiting for the CDC to split hairs and fine-tune it to a specific area.”CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said the narrowly drawn warning was dictated by science and not by any concern for Florida’s crucial tourism industry. He said it was based on the nation’s ability to contain previous outbreaks of other diseases carried by the same mosquito.“There wouldn’t be a technical or scientific basis to give a broader recommendation,” Frieden said. Tuesday, August 2, 2016 By: Kelli Kennedy And Josh Replogle Source: The Associated Press Zika outbreak in Miami prompts travel warning Sharelast_img read more