JBLM to Trim Civilian Workforce to Reflect Army Restructuring

first_imgJoint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) plans to eliminate about 900 civilian and contractor positions, or 5.5 percent of its existing civilian workforce, over the next two years, according to Army data released to the Tacoma News Tribune.The news comes on the heels of the Army’s announcement in July about its plans to shrink its active-duty end strength from 490,000 to 450,000 soldiers by the end of fiscal 2018. Officials at the time said the restructuring would be accompanied by civilian cutbacks, but as recently as last November the Army said it had not yet determined how many civilian employees would be affected.The Army’s latest restructuring is slated to eliminate 1,251 soldiers at the installation in the South Sound region of Washington state.Leaders at JBLM have been meeting to figure out how they’ll cope with hundreds fewer workers to support the installation’s day-to-day operations. Those reductions, along with additional staffing cuts expected through 2022, “will fundamentally change how we operate on base,” said Greta Powell, chief of the base’s resource management office.“It’s bleak,” Powell said.The Army plans to achieve the cutbacks primarily through attrition and retirements, said Army spokesman Lt. Col. Joe Buccino.As the Army draws down from two wars, it will need fewer civilians to run its installations, according to the story. One reason is that some functions filled by civilians now can be handled by soldiers, such as gate security. In other cases, the shrinking number of military personnel will require a smaller installation support staff.“This isn’t a crisis or a catastrophe,” said Tom Knight, the base’s chief of staff. “This is an opportunity to reassess ourselves to change the way we’re doing business here for a lot of the right reasons. We have much more of a home-station military right now,” Knight said.In advance of the cuts, Gov. Jay Inslee (D) in July directed state agencies to develop a plan for helping service members and civilian workers find new careers. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

OBITUARY Peter J Michals III 80

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Peter J. Michals III of Tewksbury passed away peacefully after a brief illness on July 19. He was 80 years old.He was born and grew up in East Cambridge, graduated from Rindge Technical School and Cambridge High and Latin. An altar boy in his youth, Peter was a devout Catholic all of his life, and attended Mass each week as a parishioner at St. Williams Church. At age 19, he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force and served from 1957 to 1960. He was a member of the Air Police and was stationed in Germany and France. He often recalled his service and the traveling he did with the Air Force as among his fondest memories. When he returned from service abroad, he married his sweetheart, Camille Samaria (Michals), who waited for him. Together, they had three children.Peter attended and held degrees from Boston University, Lowell Tech, and Lowell State University, now UMass Lowell. He was a caring family man who worked as an accountant and had a small tax preparation business until his retirement a few years ago. He loved his family, enjoyed playing sports with his son, and spent 15 years as a volunteer coach for Tewksbury Little League baseball. He was also a member of the Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks.He is survived by his beloved wife of 57 years, Camille; daughter Debra Michals and son-in-law Mark Antinoro of Newburyport; son Peter and daughter-in-law Kelly Curley of Contoocook, NH; grandson Cori Michals and granddaughter Ashley Michals of New Hampshire; step-grandchildren Sarah Antinoro and Melanie Antinoro of Acton, MA, and Casey Curley of Pensacola, FL.; his sister Janet Tosto of Tewksbury; and many nieces and nephews. His was predeceased by a daughter, Camille Marie “Camie.”Memorial Visiting hours will be on Wednesday, July 25, from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. at Tewksbury Funeral Home, corner of 1 Dewey and 975 Main Sts. (Rte. 38) TEWKSBURY CENTER, followed by a Memorial Funeral Mass at 11:30 a.m. in St. Williams Church, 1351 Main St. (Rte. 38) Tewksbury. Burial will follow at St. Mary Cemetery, No. Tewksbury. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Dept. 142, Memphis, TN 38148-0142 or visit http://www.stjude.org. Peter’s family would like to extend their gratitude to the caring staff of Woodbriar Health Center in Wilmington.Peter J. Michals III(NOTE: The above obituary is from the Tewksbury Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Elizabeth J. “Betty” (Kilpatrick) Valente, 75In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Donald R. Donahue, 80In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Brandon M. Long, 27In “Obituaries”last_img read more

BUSINESS BRIEF Wilmingtons Security Innovation ICMCP Join Forces To Address Cybersecurity Talent Shortage

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Security Innovation, an authority in application security, recently announced that it will offer free computer based training (CBT) to The International Consortium of Minority Cybersecurity Professionals (ICMCP) members looking to expand their skills or seek a career in cyber security. ICMCP is the leading destination for issues related to cybersecurity career and industry developments impacting minority cybersecurity professionals. This free training is another step in the joint partnership between the two companies, building upon the success of last year’s Web application cyber range challenge run at the ICMCP 2018 National Conference in September.All ICMCP members will have access to Security Innovation’s on-demand training that features pre-configured learning paths for more than 40 roles. This is the same curriculum offered to the company’s clients that comprise many of the world’s most reputable brands.“There is a large number of unfilled cyber security jobs, making a hacker’s job even easier,” said David Elcock, Executive Director ICMCP. “This partnership helps us achieve our mission of consistent representation of women and minorities in the cybersecurity industry, while also solving a serious industry problem.”ICMCP sponsorship builds upon Security Innovation’s objective to develop and encourage women and minorities in cybersecurity. The company has sponsored similar learning events for organization such as Women in Security & Privacy (WISP), Executive Women’s Forum (EWF), Michigan Women in Security & Privacy, United Way BoSTEM, and many others.“We are honored to continue our work with ICMCP to make this specialized training accessible to those who already have other hurdles to overcome,” said Lisa Parcella, VP of Marketing at Security Innovation. “Security Innovation is committed to making the security and technology field approachable for everyone.”ICMPC members can sign up for free training at: https://web.securityinnovation.com/icmcp2019About Security InnovationSecurity Innovation is a pioneer in software security and trusted advisor to its clients. Since 2002, organizations have relied on our assessment and training solutions to make the use of software systems safer in the most challenging environments – whether in Web applications, IoT devices, or the cloud. The company’s flagship product, CMD+CTRL Cyber Range, is the industry’s only simulated Web site environment designed to build the skills teams need to protect the enterprise where it is most vulnerable – at the application layer. Security Innovation is privately held and headquartered in Wilmington, MA USA.About ICMCPThe International Consortium of Minority Cybersecurity Professionals (ICMCP) is a non-profit organization launched in 2014 to help bridge the ‘great cyber divide’ that results from the ongoing underrepresentation of minorities and women in the fast-growing field of cyber security. The ICMCP tackles this ‘divide’ with scholarship opportunities, technical training programs, innovative outreach, mentoring and networking programs. The ICMCP targets minority and women cyber security professionals worldwide and promotes academic and technical excellence in our tradecraft.(NOTE: The above press release is from Security Innovation.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington’s Security Innovation Wins Two Security Industry Awards In FebruaryIn “Business”Wilmington’s Security Innovation Hires New Business Development Director For India As Company Continues Rapid Global GrowthIn “Business”BUSINESS BRIEF: Wilmington’s Security Innovation Uncovers Cyber Threat Impacting North American BanksIn “Business”last_img read more

POLICE LOG for April 29 Lynn Woman Arrested Wheelchair Ramp Equipment Stolen

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights of the Wilmington Police Log for Monday, April 29, 2019:A caller reported a hypodermic needle next to the tracks and walkway at the MBTA Commuter Rail station on Main Street. Police were unable to locate. (7:15am)A resident requested assistance lifting dog into vehicle to take to vet. Animal Control Officer responded and assisted. (9:47am)Fire and Police responded to two brush fires near tracks on Burlington Avenue. (11:55am)Police received a report of larceny of wheelchair ramp equipment from Shawsheen Avenue. (12:33pm)Paola Robles (22, Lynn) was arrested on Unlicensed Operation Of A Motor Vehicle. (1:23pm)Police noted an in-bound train was blocking Route 62 at North Wilmington station. (9:39pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 31: Woburn Man Arrested For OUI; Bad Highway Crash Required MedflightIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for September 5: Train Conductor Helps Locate Missing Puppy; Rented Trucks Not Returned To UHaulIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for July 29: 2 Men Arrested On Warrants; Tree Falls On 5 Cars At Town Hall; Highway CrashIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Thai government is going DIY and building its own converted EVs report

first_img 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus: A positive spin on an old favorite 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 48 Photos More From Roadshow Post a comment Enlarge ImageThis is the Honda Fit EV. It didn’t get sold in Thailand but that’s not going to stop the Thai government from making its own version. Honda Converting older cars into electric vehicles was once one of the only ways to get an EV in your driveway, but it’s gone somewhat out of fashion as commercially available, purpose-built EVs have become common.But the government of Thailand reportedly plans to develop its own electric vehicles. Specifically, the state-run Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) isn’t content for makers of electric cars to bring their wares to the country, so it’s going the way of Fugazi and doing it itself, according to a report Thursday by PaulTan.org.Now, the government isn’t going to just go all willy-nilly, modifying whatever is lying around. It’s going to focus its efforts on three specific models that are commonly available used in Thailand. Those are the Toyota Vios, Honda Jazz and Nissan Almera, which we know as the Toyota Yaris sedan, Honda Fit and Nissan Versa.EGAT is targeting a price of around 300,000 Thai baht (or approximately $9,470) to complete the conversion. This would include lithium-ion batteries, an electric motor and all the associated electronic gubbins necessary to make the thing work.Whether these converted EVs are any good remains to be seen, and since more are becoming available through more traditional means — Hyundai sells the Ioniq and Kona Electric in Thailand now, Nissan sells the Leaf and has for a year — we’ll be curious to see if anyone actually buys one. 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value 0 Share your voice Electric Cars Car Culture Tags 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Honda Nissan Toyotalast_img read more

23 bn IdeaVodafone merger gets conditional goahead from exchanges

first_imgREUTERS/Shailesh AndradeThe Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) and its exchanges have given their conditional approval to the merger between Kumar Mangalam Birla-owned Idea Cellular and Vodafone India. It will be subject to the regulator’s ongoing probe and approvals from public shareholders and the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT), a PTI report said on Tuesday.Vodafone India and Idea Cellular had announced the merger of their operations in March this year to create the country’s largest mobile phone operator worth more than $23 billion with a 35 per cent market share.The $23-billion merger deal would be subject to the outcome of an ongoing probe by the regulator and approvals from public shareholders and National Company Law Appellate Tribunal (NCLT). The multi-layered deal was announced in March and recently got clearance from the fair trade regulator Competition Commission of India (CCI).In their no-objection letters on “draft composite scheme of amalgamation and arrangement among Vodafone Mobile Services, Vodafone India and Idea Cellular and their respective shareholders and creditors”, BSE and NSE said that all the conditions put forth by the regulator need to be placed before NCLT while seeking its approval.The regulator said Idea has given a voluntary undertaking to Sebi that it will not dispose of shares that were purchased by one of its promoters before the merger announcement, till further directions from Sebi.In its detailed comments on the draft scheme, Sebi said it had received a complaint alleging that one of the promoters of Idea Cellular had purchased 0.23 per cent shares of the company before the announcement of the draft scheme of amalgamation and these transactions by the purchasers were in violation of securities laws, PTI reported on Tuesday.Sebi has also received complaints about alleged violation of takeover norms as the shareholding of Idea would increase from about 21 per cent to about 26 per cent pursuant to the scheme.”The said allegations are being examined by Sebi,” the report said, quoting the regulator.Idea has also submitted a voluntary undertaking stating that it will comply with the directions of Sebi in respect of the ongoing examination. It has also undertaken that any liability eventually held to be valid against it shall be borne by Idea, PTI said in its report.”The acquisition pursuant to draft scheme of arrangement is exempt from the obligation to make an open offer…if the acquisition is pursuant to a scheme of arrangement, inter- alia, including amalgamation, merger or demerger, pursuant to an order of a court or a competent authority under any law or regulation, Indian or foreign. Thus, the said exemption is applicable only if NCLT approves the draft scheme,” Sebi said.The regulator further said an ‘abridged prospectus’ about the deal will need to contain a risk factor (at number 1) detailing the risks associated with the outcome of the examination by Sebi of the allegations in the complaint. The company will need to ensure that the scheme clearly provides for voting by public shareholders and that the scheme of arrangement is acted upon only if the votes cast by the public shareholders in favour of the proposal are more than the number of votes cast against it.The explanatory statement to the notice to shareholders need to disclose prominently that Sebi is examining the allegations with regard to transactions done by the purchasers in the shares of Idea before the announcement of the scheme.”All the above facts shall be brought to the notice of NCLT,” Sebi said.last_img read more

Punjab MLA Manjinder Sirsa refuses to apologise for saying Bollywood celebs took

first_imgManjinder Singh SirsaIANSDisgusted that his state Punjab was derided by Bollywood as a drugs haven in the film “Udta Punjab”, Akali Dal MLA Manjinder S. Sirsa on Wednesday refused to backtrack from his diatribe against B-town actors, including Deepika Padukone and Shahid Kapoor, for flaunting their “drugged state” at a party.Filmmaker Karan Johar recently shared a video of the party that was attended by top stars including Deepika, Ranbir Kapoor, Vicky Kaushal, Arjun Kapoor and Shahid, captioning it “Saturday Night Vibes”.Sharing the video with a reference to the Shahid-starrer “Udta Punjab”, which dealt with drug abuse, Sirsa tweeted: “#UDTABollywood – Fiction Vs Reality. Watch how the high and mighty of Bollywood proudly flaunt their drugged state. I raise my voice against #DrugAbuse by these stars. RT if you too feel disgusted @shahidkapoor @deepikapadukone @arjunk2@Varun_dvn @karanjohar @vickykaushal09.”#UDTABollywood – Fiction Vs RealityWatch how the high and mighty of Bollywood proudly flaunt their drugged state!! I raise my voice against #DrugAbuse by these stars. RT if you too feel disgusted @shahidkapoor @deepikapadukone @arjunk26 @Varun_dvn @karanjohar @vickykaushal09 pic.twitter.com/aBiRxwgQx9— Manjinder S Sirsa (@mssirsa) July 30, 2019With the Twitterati going berserk over his tweet, the Akali Dal leader said the youth look upon the celebrities who should feel ashamed for defaming Punjab when they themselves indulged in drugs related activities.”Nobody in the whole world can force me to apologise to drug addicts. I will stand by what I said. These people were doing drugs, they are drug addicts. They are ruining the society and jail is the right place for them, not society. Those who are asking me to apologise need to go and see who all are indulging in drugs,” Sirsa said.The actors were yet to comment on the issue but politician Milind Deora refuted Sirsa’s claims.”My wife was also present that evening (and is in the video). Nobody was in a ‘drugged state’, so stop spreading lies and defaming people you don’t know! I hope you will show the courage to tender an unconditional apology,” he tweeted.Neither I know @milinddeora; nor his family. I didn’t share this video to harass anyone but to expose Bollywood stars who are themselves into drugs yet defamed our youth calling them drug addict!! I would never apologise to these drug addicts.@ANI @TimesNow @ZeeNews https://t.co/GRB4x5OICC pic.twitter.com/MIn0iPh2x0— Manjinder S Sirsa (@mssirsa) July 31, 2019Sirsa also said that he didn’t know that Deora’s wife was in the video.”But I want to say this with conviction that Bollywood stars are indulging in drugs in the video,” Sirsa responded.The Twitterati too criticised Sirsa for his reaction. “Let them be stoned or drunk. Why does it bother you?” tweeted Ishita Yadav, who is Parliamentary Secretary to Pilibhit MP Varun Gandhi.Sirsa replied: “They are public figures!! They are called ‘stars’ & they enjoy many privileges. Don’t they lecture us on every issue from their verified Twitter handles? So today they are answerable to every Indian for their drug-effected stoned look as visible in this video.”Yadav hit back: “Were you there? Was someone you know there? You can’t go around attacking people based on conjecture.”However, Sirsa refused to pause: “Since @IshitaYadav is so furiously defending the celebs & advocating their innocence in drugs… Let us all request @karanjohar @shahidkapoor @Varun_dvn @arjunk26 @deepikapadukone to get DOPE TEST done & share reports on Twitter. Pls prove me wrong by dope test report Ishita Ji.”last_img read more

By hook crook and ballot – Democracy the loser

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina speaks to reporters after casting her vote in parliamentary elections in Dhaka, on Sunday.—Photo: APBangladesh Awami League’s election victory with a margin of victory at 96 per cent “was a result one might expect in a place like North Korea, not a democratic nation such as Bangladesh”, writes The Washington Post.That is, according to the US newspaper, exactly the problem: prime minister Sheikh Hasina “consolidated her grip on power but at the cost of her own electoral legitimacy.”Her party and its allies secured 288 out of 299 contested seats. The opposition BNP, which won only seven, has called the election “farcical” and demanded a do-over, TIME magazine mentioned in an article ‘They Threaten Everyone’, adding that Sheikh Hasina’s “landslide win in Bangladesh marred by voter suppression”.The Economist wrote, “… the embarrassingly skewed tally suggested that the BNP was not really the biggest loser. The biggest loss was for democracy itself.”It observed that the flawed general election of 30 December represented a sharp reversion to the less democratic end of the spectrum. “The Awami League, which has been in power continuously for 10 years, flagrantly wielded the full power of state institutions,” the British magazine said in a piece “By hook, crook and ballot”.TIME magazine cited an example of voting in Dhaka on 30 December, quoting a polls worker who tried to defend disruption in voting as “Lunch break”. But by 3.10pm, the explanation had changed. “We’ve already started to count,” a policeman was quoted to have said. The polls had been supposed to close at 4pm.It also pointed out that the result of AL’s landslide victory has been clouded by pre-election violence and allegations of a crackdown on the opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP), as well as widespread reports of vote-rigging and intimidation on election day, some of which was observed by TIME on the ground.The Washington Post reported that there were scattered reports of irregularities at polling stations, including possible vote tampering, “but observers said Hasina had used other means to tilt the field in her favour long before Sunday.”Nazrul Islam Khan, a standing committee leader of the BNP, told TIME that “the extent to which the government has rigged these elections is beyond imagination.”The AL chief, Hasina, rejected all allegations of impropriety, at a briefing with journalists and election observers on Monday evening. Her advisor HT Imam was said to have called it “one of the best elections held ever.”Evidence of voter disruption was widespread, said TIME. At one polling station at Kabi Nazrul Islam College in Old Dhaka, TIME was reportedly harassed by dozens of government supporters and forced to delete a video showing a woman who got into a fight with poll workers.It wasn’t just BNP supporters who claimed they were prevented from voting. “I wanted to vote for the Awami League anyway, but when I reached the polling station they told me my vote had already been cast,” said one woman who asked TIME not to publish her name for fear of reprisals.The Economist said the sweeping nature of the repression meant that on voting day, few of the BNP’s electoral agents — who guide voters and monitor the process — dared show up at the 40,000 polling stations. By contrast, the Awami League fielded 120,000 agents. In Dhaka, the capital, it was hard to find a single poster for the BNP among the tens of thousands boosting the Awami League, the magazine said.The sweeping nature of Hasina’s victory raises “serious doubt” about the fairness of the election, the Post quoted Ataur Rahman, president of the Bangladesh Political Scientist Association, as saying. He added that the opposition’s tiny number of seats also means there will be no mechanism for political accountability.Hasina, according to the newspaper, is also viewed by some — including in neighbouring India — as an ally against the potential spread of Islamist extremism in Bangladesh.After Sunday’s election, Bangladesh has become a “one-party democracy,” Kanchan Gupta, a political commentator in New Delhi, was quoted to have written. Hasina “faces no opposition worth its name.”“Why should Sheikh Hasina pull out so many stops to ensure a victory that most observers had assumed was in the bag in any case?” wrote The Economist, adding that opinion polls had universally shown a solid advantage for the Awami League.The magazine observed that Sheikh Hasina seems to bear a personal grudge against perceived enemies, which springs both from the murder of her family members including Bangabandhu Sheikh Mijibur Rahman in 1975 and from an attempt on her own life that has allegedly been tied to figures in the BNP.Some of the ruling party’s rivals were quoted to have suggested that the AL needs to cling to power to cover its own corruption.TIME quoted Bangladeshi editors and journalists as saying that it’s increasingly difficult to publish news that embarrasses the government. Some estimate they self-censor at least two-thirds of their stories. “I am not sure if I want to stay in this country now that the Awami League will feel even more entitled to stifle dissent,” one TV journalist, who wished to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation, was quoted to have said.And on social media, it reported, criticism of the government is carefully shrouded in irony. “Can someone please tell me if my vote was already cast? Then I don’t have to get out of bed this morning,” a law student posted on Facebook on election day.TIME referred to a BNP activist, Mozammal Hossain, one of a dozen BNP activists who were documenting fraud, arrests, voter harassment and violence during these elections, as saying that his parents were recently harassed by police for their son’s work. “They threaten everyone,” he was quoted to have said.last_img read more

Lawsuit Filed In Womans Death In Houston Hotel During Harvey

Twitter via @TiffanyAlanizA woman whose body was found 11 days after she made a frantic cellphone call from a Houston hotel elevator as floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey rushed in exited the elevator in the basement only to struggle against a strong waist-high current strewn with debris, a lawsuit filed Monday says.Jill Renick’s family filed a civil lawsuit in district court in Dallas, saying there wasn’t proper planning for flooding at the Omni Houston Hotel, where Renick worked and where flooding had occurred before. The lawsuit, which lists Omni Hotels and Resorts and Otis Elevator Company among the defendants, reveals new details of what happened in the moments leading up to the drowning of 48-year-old Renick.Renick “suffered a terrifying and horrific death” that was “unnecessary and easily preventable,” according to the lawsuit.“It’s just inexcusable for a hotel operation of this size to be that irresponsible,” said Rob Crain, the lead attorney for the family.The fate of Renick, who was the director of spa services at the hotel, was one of the most perplexing mysteries that came out of Harvey’s devastating flooding. She disappeared in the early morning hours of Aug. 27 as floodwaters inundated Houston. Her body was finally discovered on Sept. 7 in the ceiling of the hotel’s basement.“I don’t want this to happen to anybody again — employee or guest,” said Renick’s sister, Pam Eslinger.Renick, who spent the night with her dog in a room on the hotel’s third floor, was called by a staffer around 5:15 a.m. on Aug. 27 and told to “come downstairs,” Crain said.“We’ve asked for more specificity as to what she was told and we were told that that’s pretty much it: that she was told to come downstairs,” Crain said.The lawsuit said there’s no indication she was told the basement and elevator shafts were flooding, or that she was told to avoid the elevators. The lawsuit also adds that the elevators weren’t disabled, nor were they barricaded to prevent passengers from entering.“She was not given any indication that anything was remiss or dangerous for her to go downstairs,” Crain said, adding, “There was not a coordinated plan that was being implemented.”About 5:40 a.m., Renick made the call for help. The lawsuit says that according to the hotel, Renick said she was trapped in the basement service elevator and water was coming in. The lawsuit also says Renick “was heard screaming and clamoring for help by people on the first floor.”The lawsuit notes that the third floor, where she was staying, doesn’t have access to the service elevator so she would have likely had to access it from the first or second floors.According to the lawsuit, she was somehow able to exit the elevator into the basement. Video footage provided by the hotel to her family’s attorneys shows her coming from the area of the service elevator at 5:44 a.m.“We see her going against the flow of the floodwaters. We also see her shortly thereafter coming back with the flow of the water,” said Crain, who added, “It is clearly somebody who is trying to find a way out of this horribly terrifying condition.”The video ends at 5:45 a.m. and Renick isn’t seen alive again. “She desperately searched for a way out before climbing above the ceiling tiles and ceiling joists for the last pockets of air,” says the lawsuit, which adds that floodwaters eventually rose to the hotel’s first floor.The lawsuit says that before Renick was called in her room it was known that the basement and elevator shafts were flooding, noting that in that time period, people who appear to be hotel employees can be seen on the video walking through the accumulating water in the basement.The hotel, located near the Buffalo Bayou, has a history of flooding and is located in a flood plain, according to the lawsuit.The lawsuit also alleges that Otis Elevator, which had a contract with the hotel to maintain and service the elevators, should’ve installed flood sensors and warned users of the dangers of operating an elevator in flooding.Spokeswomen for both Omni and Otis said they don’t comment on pending litigation.The Occupational Safety and Health Administration in February fined the hotel for a violation, saying that the elevators being kept operational during flooding exposed employees to drowning.The hotel is currently undergoing a $30 million renovation and is set to reopen in November.Eslinger described her sister as the kind of person who “everybody gravitated to.”“She was wonderful and she’s missed terribly every day,” Eslinger said. Share read more

Prime accused in Ggn shooting case held

first_imgA 27-year-old man accused of plotting the July 15 shootout of a gangster here has been arrested, police said on Saturday. Kavinder Singh of Baund Kalan village in Haryana’s Bhiwani district was arrested from his hideout in Gurgaon’s Garhi Harsaru village on Friday night by the Crime Branch.Gangster Rakesh Hayatpur was shot at by four men in a car while driving to the district court. One person was killed and two were injured when his SUV rammed into an autorickshaw after the shooting near Central Mall. Kavinder Singh, a graduate, who plotted the attack, was produced before a magistrate on Saturday and sent to two days police remand. “Rakesh escaped the attack because Kavinder got overexcited after seeing the target and ordered his men to shoot him immediately,” Yashwant Singh of the Crime Branch said. The SUV’s driver who suffered a gun shot lost control over his vehicle. It rammed into an autorickshaw, killing its driver.last_img read more

Visa increase will impact youth market ATEC

first_imgSource = e-Travel Blackboard: K.W Young visitors to Australia stay for around eight months and spend over $13,000 each. Planned increases to the cost of working holiday visas (WHV) will impact Tourism Australia’s youth marketing initiatives, according to Australian Tourism Export Council (ATEC).ATEC managing director Felicia Mariani said the youth travel market plays an important role in our inbound visitation, spending considerably more than the average international visitor.“Young people visiting Australia, and working holiday makers in particular stay around eight months and spend over $13,000 each,” Ms Mariani saidA recent meeting of the Executive Council of the UN World Tourism Organisation highlighted the value of youth travel in the tourism mix, with the sector reported to be worth over $185 billion US dollars globally.It is crucial Australia taps into this increasingly valuable market and looks to more effectively target the youth market, according to Ms Mariani.The 28.6 percent increase to the WHV fee outlined in last month’s Mid-year Economic and Fiscal Outlook adds pressure on industry operators.“It further undermines the industry’s international competitiveness, compounding the view that Australia is an expensive destination for youth travellers,” Ms Mariani added.“If the WHV is one of our major drawcards in an increasingly competitive global tourism landscape, the Government should be supporting the industry by bringing down the barriers and increasing our competitiveness.”last_img read more

Netflix has raised the price of its service in Eur

first_imgNetflix has raised the price of its service in Europe for new subscribers, upping the Eurozone price of the standard service from €8.99 to €9.99 as of yesterday.The standard offer allows subscriber to access HD content and view it on two devices. Netflix’s other two offers, the more basic ‘Essential’ tier, offering access via one device without HD, and its ‘Premium’ offering, providing content including 4K video on up to four devices, remain unchanged, at €7.99 and €11.99 respectively.The increase currently only affects new customers, and the company guaranteed that its offer to existing subscribers will remain unchanged for a year.In Switzerland, the company raised the price of its standard service from CHF12.90 (€11.93) to CHF14.90.In an email to subscribers, the company said that the price hike was necessary to ensure that the company was able to continue to add more new TV series and films to its offering. Netflix faces intense competition from domestic SVoD services such as CanalPlay and Maxdome in Europe for local content rights.Join the discussion on LinkedIn.last_img read more

BBC One coproduction Bodyguard and comingofage

first_imgBBC One co-production Bodyguard and coming-of-age drama On My Block were among Netflix’s most binged US shows of the year.The global SVOD revealed the shows launched between 1 January and 28 November in the US with the highest average watch time per viewing session.The service, which is notorious for keeping tight-lipped on viewership data, made clear that the list “has no relation to overall viewing” across its territories.On My Block, which follows a group of friends in Los Angeles braving the early days of high school, topped its list of most-binged shows, followed by series two of Making a Murderer and 13 Reasons Why; Last Chance U: INDY; Bodyguard; Fastest Car; The Haunting of Hill House; the second series of Anne with an E; Insatiable; and series six of Orange Is the New Black.Notably missing from the list were high-profile launches such as the sixth and final series of the Robin Wright-led House of Cards; Emma Stone and Jonah Hill-starring dark comedy Maniac; series five of Arrested Development and sci-fi Altered Carbon.Also absent from the list were any non-English language titles.Netflix released a similar round-up last year, denoting its most “devoured” and “savoured” programmes, as well as the shows that “got us cheating” and “brought us together”, via a sliding Binge Scale.The streaming service also revealed its most rewatched films, based on global viewing. The top films were The Kissing Booth, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before and Roxanne Roxanne, with almost 50% of viewers re-watching the top two films.Elsewhere, Netflix’s top stars – according to talent that received the largest percentage growth across their Instagram followings since January – were the Fab Five (Queer Eye); Lana Candor (To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before); Joel Courtney (The Kissing Booth); Miguel Herrán (Elite/La Casa de Papel); Jaime Lorente Lopez (Elite/La Casa de Papel); and Maria Pedraza (Elite/La Casa de Papel).Others included Noah Centineo (To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before/Sierra Burgess is a Loser); Joey King (The Kissing Booth); Hannah Gadsby (Nanette); and Kiernan Shipka (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina).last_img read more

The tiny hand and forearm slipped out too early B

first_imgThe tiny hand and forearm slipped out too early. Babies are not delivered shoulder first. Dr. Terri Marino, an obstetrician in the Boston area who specializes in high-risk deliveries, tucked it back inside the boy’s mother.”He was trying to shake my hand and I was like, ‘I’m not having this — put your hand back in there,’ ” Marino would say later, after all 5 pounds, 1 ounce of the baby lay wailing under a heating lamp.This is the story of how that baby, Bryce McDougall, tested the best efforts of more than a dozen medical staffers at South Shore Hospital in Weymouth, Mass., one day last summer.Bryce’s birth also put to the test a new method of reducing cesarean sections that has been developed at Dr. Atul Gawande’s Ariadne Labs, a “joint center for health systems innovation” at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.The story starts before Bryce’s birth, on the last day of August at about 9:30 in the morning.Melisa McDougall has just checked into South Shore, after a routine ultrasound. She’s in her 36th week, pregnant with twin boys. The doctors have warned Melisa that her placenta won’t hold out much longer. She’s propped up in bed, blond hair pulled into a neat bun, makeup still fresh, ordering a sandwich, when her regular obstetrician arrives.”How are you?” asks Dr. Ruth Levesque, sweeping into the room and clapping her hands. “You’re going to have some babies today! Are you excited?”The first of the twins — Brady — is head-down, ready for a normal vaginal delivery. But his brother, Bryce, is horizontal at the top of Melisa’s uterus.That’s one reason Melisa is a candidate for a C-section. Babies do not come out sideways. And there’s another reason most doctors would never consider a vaginal delivery in Melisa’s case, Levesque says. Four years ago, she delivered the twins’ sister by cesarean.”[Melisa] has a scar on her uterus,” Levesque explains, “so there’s a risk of uterine rupture — very rare, but there’s always a possibility.”And that possibility may be greater for Melisa because she’s 37 years old and having twins. But the McDougalls hope to have vaginal deliveries for both boys.”I just feel like it’s better for the kids — better for the babies,” Melisa says.How the Team Birth Project came to beAvoiding C-sections is also better for many moms. With cesareans, there’s a longer recovery period, a greater risk of infection and an association with injury and death. And most are not medically necessary, says Dr. Neel Shah, who directs the Delivery Decisions Initiative at Ariadne Labs.”We’re fairly confident that, when you look nationally, the plurality — if not the majority — of C-sections are probably avoidable,” says Shah.Those avoidable C-sections are the focus of the Team Birth Project, designed by Shah with input from roughly 50 doctors, nurses, midwives, doulas, public health specialists and consumer advocates who focus on childbirth. South Shore Hospital is one of the pilot sites for the project.In describing the collaboration, Shah begins with an acknowledgement: Childbirth is complicated. You’ve got two patients — the mother and the baby — and an ad hoc, often shifting team that at a minimum includes the mom, a nurse and a doctor.”So you’ve got three people who have to come together and become a very high-performing team in a really short period of time, for one of the most important moments in a person’s life,” Shah says.And this team has to perform at its best during an unpredictable event: labor.Shah says doctors and nurses generally agree about three things: when a mom is in active labor; when a mom can definitely try for a vaginal delivery; and when she must have a C-section.”And then there’s this huge gray zone,” Shah says. “And actually, everything about the Team Birth Project is about solving for the gray.”To avoid unnecessary C-sections when what to do isn’t clear, this hospital, in conjunction with the Ariadne project, has changed the way labor and delivery is handled from start to finish.First, women aren’t admitted until they are in active labor. Secondly, the mom’s preferences — such as whether she would like an epidural or not and whether she wants to have “skin-to-skin contact” with the baby immediately after birth — help guide the members of the labor team. The team members map the delivery plan — including Mom’s preferences and the medical team’s guidance — on a whiteboard, like the one in Melisa’s room.For the births of Bryce and Brady McDougall, the white erasable planning board gets a lot of use.Under “team,” Dr. Levesque and registered nurse Patty Newbitt write their names. Melisa and Shaun McDougall are also listed as equal partners. The names of other family members or nurses may be added and erased as labor progresses. Shah’s idea is that this team will “huddle” regularly throughout the labor to discuss the evolving birth plan.The birth plan itself is divided into three separate elements on the board: maternal (the mom), fetal (the baby) and progress (in terms of how the labor is progressing). A mom with high blood pressure may need special attention — and that would be noted on the board — but she could still have a normal labor and vaginal delivery.Good communication is keyDr. Kim Dever, who chairs the OB-GYN department at South Shore, highlights a section of the whiteboard called “Next Assessment.”That category is included on the board, Dever says, “because one of the things I often heard from patients is that they didn’t know what was going to happen next. Now they know.”Asking the mom — and the couple — about their preferences for the delivery is crucial, too, Levesque says.”It forces us to stop and to think about everything with the patient,” she explains.”It makes us verbalize our thought process, which I think is good.”Shaun McDougall walks across the room to get a closer look at the whiteboard.”Honestly, it seems like common sense,” he says. “I would always think the nurses would have something like this, but to have it out where mom and dad can see it — I think it’s pretty cool.”With Melisa McDougall’s plan in place, everyone settles in, to wait. About four hours later, Melisa isn’t yet feeling contractions. Levesque breaks the water sac around Brady.”Looks nice and clear,” Levesque reports. “Hey bud, come on and hang out with us,” she says to the baby, tickling his head.”So, you’re going to keep leaking fluid until you leak babies,” the doctor explains to Melisa. “Whenever you start getting uncomfortable, we’ll get you an epidural at that point.”Levesque moves to the board and adds updates: Melisa is 4 centimeters dilated; her waters broke at 13:26; the next assessment will be after she gets an epidural.The medical team insisted ahead of time that Melisa agree to be numbed from the waist down if she wants to deliver Bryce — the second twin — vaginally. Melissa agreed. The obstetricians may need to rotate the baby in her uterus, find a foot and pull Bryce out, causing pain most women would not tolerate.One of those doctors — Marino — peeks into the room and waves.”Just came to say hi,” says Marino, who has more experience than most obstetricians in delivering babies positioned like Bryce. Along with Levesque, Marino has been seeing Melisa regularly in office visits.Shaun McDougall asks the physicians if they’ll pose for a picture with his wife.”Can we make funny faces?” asks Levesque.”I want you to,” says Shaun. “You guys are like her favorite people on the planet.”As the hours tick by, there’s a shift change, and registered nurse Barbara Fatemi joins the McDougall team. She checks Melisa’s pain level regularly to determine when she’s ready for the epidural.Melisa says she isn’t feeling much but adds that she has a high tolerance for pain. Shaun tells Fatemi he sees the strain on his wife’s face. Fatemi acts on Shaun’s assessment and calls an anesthesiologist to prepare the epidural, something Shaun later says reinforces his feeling that they’re a team.Levesque soon arrives for the promised “next assessment.” Melisa is now 10 centimeters dilated and ready to deliver — but she must hold on until nurses can get her into an operating room.Levesque will still attempt to deliver both babies vaginally, she explains, but in the operating room, Melisa will be in the right place if Bryce doesn’t shift his position inside the uterus, and the doctor needs to do a last-minute cesarean.”I’ll see you in a few minutes. No pushing without me, OK?” Levesque says over her shoulder as she heads to the operating room to prep.”I’ll try,” Melisa says, weakly. In a minute, nurses are rolling her down the hall, following Levesque.Almost five years ago, two women who were wheeled into this hospital’s operating rooms during childbirth died after undergoing C-sections. Though state investigators found no evidence of substandard care, Dever says the hospital scrutinized everything.”When you have something like that happen, that expedites your efforts,” she says. “Exponentially.”Now, Dever says, she sees an opportunity, through the Team Birth Project, to model changes that could help women far and wide.”I would love women everywhere to be able to come in and have a safe birth and healthy baby,” she says. “That’s why I’m doing it.””They did not flinch”Dever is about to see her pilot study of the Team Birth Project pushed to new limits by little Bryce McDougall. First, though, Melisa must deliver Bryce’s brother, Brady. Even his birth, the one that was expected to be easier, is more difficult than anticipated.Bent nearly in half, her face beet red, Melisa strains for five pushes. She throws up, then gets back to laboring. And suddenly, there he is.”Oh my goodness, Brady, oh Brady,” wails Shaun. He follows a nurse holding his son over to a warmer.Marino takes Shaun’s place next to Levesque, who has reached inside Melisa to get the next twin. Levesque’s mission is to grab Bryce’s feet and guide him out. But everything feels like fingers, not toes.”That’s a hand,” she murmurs. “That’s a hand, too.”Marino rolls an ultrasound across Melisa’s belly, hoping the scan will show a foot. But Bryce’s feet are out of sight and out of reach.Marino has had more experience than most obstetricians with transverse babies, and this procedure, known as a breech extraction; she asks to try. She reaches into Melisa’s uterus while Levesque moves to Melisa’s right side and uses her forearm to shift Bryce and push him down. Dever, the head of obstetrics, has come into the room and takes over the ultrasound. At least six doctors and nurses encircle Melisa, whose face is taut. Shaun frowns.”Babe, you OK?” he asks.Melisa nods. Bryce’s heart rate is steady. But there’s still no sign of a foot. One little hand slips out and Marino nudges it back in.”Open the table,” says Marino, her voice strained.It’s open and ready, her colleagues say, referring to the array of sterile surgical instruments that Marino may soon need, to begin a C-section.For 36 seconds, this room with more than a dozen adults grows oddly quiet. Everyone is watching Marino twist her arm this way and that, determined to find Bryce’s feet. Levesque leans hard into Melisa’s belly. Shaun bites his lip. Then Marino yanks at something — and her gloved, bloodied hand emerges, clenching baby Bryce by his two teeny legs.”Oh babe, here he comes, here he comes — Woo!” squeals Shaun.Shaun is overcome with emotion again. Melisa manages an exhausted giggle. Baby Bryce keeps everyone waiting a few more seconds and then howls.Levesque starts to stitch up a small tear for Melisa, and Marino comes around to congratulate the new mom.”He was fighting you, huh?” Melisa says, and laughs.Outside the operating room, Levesque and Marino look relieved and elated. Both agree that most doctors would have delivered Bryce by C-section. But at South Shore, the McDougalls found a hospital that has challenged itself to perform fewer C-sections and a doctor with experience in these unusual deliveries — one who knew and respected the parents’ preference.”They specifically wanted to have a vaginal delivery of both babies,” Marino says — and that was on her mind during the difficult moments.Bryce was fine, says Marino, so the deciding factor for her was that Shaun and Melisa did not panic.”They did not flinch — they were like, ‘Keep going,’ ” Marino recalls. “Sometimes the patient will say ‘stop,’ and then you have to stop.”The babies’ father says he came close to requesting that, in the very last minute before Bryce was born.”That part with the arm — it was pretty aggressive,” Shaun says.But in that moment, he adds, the feeling that he and Melisa were part of the team made a difference.”It made us more comfortable,” Shaun says, and that comfort translated to trust. “We trusted the decisions they were making.”Melisa says she’s grateful for the vaginal delivery.”I did not want to have a natural birth and a C-section,” she says. “That would be a brutal recovery.”Instead, 30 minutes after Marino pulled Bryce out of her, Melisa is nursing Brady and talking with family members via FaceTime.Next assessment for The Team Birth ProjectSouth Shore began using the Team Birth approach in April. Three other hospitals are also pilot sites: Saint Francis in Tulsa, Okla.; EvergreenHealth in Kirkland, Wash.; and Overlake in Redmond, Wash. The test period runs for two years. In the first four months at South Shore, the hospital’s primary, low-risk C-section rate dropped from 31 percent to 27 percent — about four fewer C-sections each month.Experts who contributed to the development of the Team Birth Project are anxious to see whether other hospitals can lower their rates of C-section and keep them down.”Once you get past the early adopters, how do you demonstrate the benefits for others that aren’t willing to change?” asks Gene Declercq, a professor of community health sciences at Boston University School of Public Health.Declercq notes that a few insurers are beginning to force that question, refusing to include in their networks hospitals that have high C-section rates, or high rates of other unnecessary, if not harmful, care.Declercq says the project’s focus on communication in the labor and delivery room makes sense because many physicians decide when to perform a cesarean based on clinical habit or the culture of their hospital.”If you can impact that decision-making process, you can perhaps change the culture that might lead to unnecessary cesareans,” says Declercq.The federal government has set a target rate for hospitals: No more than 23.9 percent of first-time, low-risk mothers should be delivering by C-section. The U.S. average in 2016 was 25.7 percent.The target was put in place because research has shown that if a woman’s first delivery is a C-section, her subsequent deliveries are highly likely to be C-sections, too — raising her (and her baby’s) risk for complications and even death.This story is part of NPR’s reporting partnership with WBUR and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2018 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.last_img read more

Updated at 320 pmThe first of more than 1600 l

first_imgUpdated at 3:20 p.m.The first of more than 1,600 lawsuits pending against Purdue Pharma, the maker of the opioid OxyContin, has been settled. The drugmaker has agreed to pay $270 million to fund addiction research and treatment in Oklahoma and pay legal fees.Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter filed suit two years ago alleging Purdue helped ignite the opioid crisis with aggressive marketing of the blockbuster drug OxyContin and deceptive claims that downplayed the dangers of addiction. Hunter had sought $20 billion dollars in damages against Purdue and other pharmaceutical firms.The settlement comes one day after the Oklahoma Supreme Court denied Purdue’s appeal for a delay of the trial. It is expected to begin on May 28, with the remaining defendants, including Johnson & Johnson and Teva Pharmaceuticals. A judge has said the trial can be televised.”We see this agreement with Oklahoma as an extension of our commitment to help drive solutions to the opioid addiction crisis,” said Purdue Pharma CEO Dr. Craig Landau, in statement. “We pledge Purdue’s ongoing support to the National Center and the life-saving work it will do for generations to come.”Landau refers to a new National Center for Addiction Studies and Treatment to be housed a Oklahoma State University in Tulsa. It will be funded by $102.5 million from Purdue and $75 million from the Sackler family, which owns the drug company.”The agreement reached today will provide assistance to individuals nationwide who desperately need these services — rather than squandering resources on protracted litigation,” the Sackler family said in a statement. “We have profound compassion for those who are affected by addiction and are committed to playing a constructive role in the coordinated effort to save lives.”Members of the Sackler family, some of whom were expected to be called to testify at trial, are reportedly contributing to the settlement. Court documents filed in Massachusetts show the Sacklers made more than $4 billion on opioid sales between 2008 and 2016.The settlement also includes $20 million for medicines to be used by patients in the center, $12.5 million for counties and municipalities in Oklahoma and $60 million for legal fees.Some lawyers suggest the deal in Oklahoma is the beginning of many more in cases that stretch across the nation. Attorneys representing more than 1,600 lawsuits consolidated in a federal court in Northern Ohio say the resolution in Oklahoma reflects the strength of claims against Purdue.”We have long alleged that Purdue Pharma ignited today’s epidemic by starting the disturbing practice of deceptive opioid marketing, convincing both doctors and the American public to trust that these drugs were safe and virtually non-addictive,” said plaintiffs’ attorneys Paul J. Hanly Jr., Paul T. Farrell Jr. and Joe Rice, in a statement. “Purdue’s wrongdoing, however, does not stand alone.”There are nearly two dozen defendants named in the consolidated opioid lawsuits.The U.S. and individual states are beginning to tally health care, incarceration and law enforcement costs tied to epidemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the burden based on prescription drug misuse alone, in 2013, was $78.5 billion. Oklahoma estimated the opioid crisis would cost the state nearly $9 billion, according to the Washington Post. In Massachusetts, the costs, along with lost productivity, were $15.2 billion in 2017.The CDC says a record 47,600 people died after an opioid overdose in 2017. Purdue’s CEO has said the company is exploring bankruptcy amid rising pressures. The U.S. House Oversight Committee has asked Purdue to produce a trove of documents by April 4 about the marketing and sales strategies for OxyContin.Members of some families that lost loved ones to an opioid overdose say they are disturbed by the settlement. Rhonda Lotti, of Watertown, Mass., had planned to attend the trial with other members of an opioid overdose grief group. Lotti’s daughter Mariah suffered a fatal overdose in 2011 at age 19.”I’m disgusted,” said Lotti in an email.”How many lives were worth $270 million?”This story is part of a reporting partnership between WBUR, NPR and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2019 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.last_img read more

The Fortnite Dance Lawsuits Are Close to Falling Apart

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Documents suggest that Alfonso Ribeiro can’t copyright his signature move, the ‘Carlton Dance.’ Next Article The ‘Fortnite’ Dance Lawsuits Are Close to Falling Apart Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. 3 min read Epic Games has found itself slapped with a flurry of lawsuits, all alleging the company of stealing people’s dance moves and selling them on for a profit. These dances are incorporated into its world-conquering game Fortnite, which are bought by players for a quantity of in-game currency (costing real money). That’s angered a number of musicians and viral video stars, who feel that they’ve been ripped off, but in one high-profile case, the law might be on Epic’s side.Alfonso Ribeiro, star of early ’90s sitcom The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, was one of the plaintiffs arguing for a slice of Epic’s cash. Ribeiro claimed to be the creator of the “Carlton Dance,” a goofy routine that Epic sold as a Fortnite emote — unsubtly named “Fresh” — inside the game. Sadly, documents uncovered by The Hollywood Reporter reveal that Ribeiro’s application to copyright his sway has been denied.According to the US Copyright Office, Ribeiro’s claim to copyright the “Carlton Dance” has failed because it is just a “simple dance routine.” That puts it beyond the protections of s102(4) Copyright Act 1976, which requires dances to be “a related series of dance movements and patterns organized into a coherent whole.” Not to mention that, if basic motions were copyrightable, nobody would be able to walk down the street without facing a potential lawsuit.Ribeiro was always on shaky legal ground to begin with, given that he often admitted that the “Carlton Dance” was inspired by others. In 2015, he told HuffPost Live (amongst other news outlets) that he was inspired by both Eddie Murphy and Bruce Springsteen’s Dancing in the Dark video. Specifically, the moment when a pre-fame Courtney Cox is invited on stage to dance, which Ribiero says he adopted.There was also the more nuanced legal fact that Ribeiro initially performed on a televised sitcom, his employer at the time. Which meant that, if the dance had been copyrightable (which it isn’t), NBC, rather than Ribiero, would be the owner. Now, while the lawsuit hasn’t been thrown out (yet), it doesn’t sound too good for the actor, or anyone else who’s trying to get a cut of Epic’s epic windfall.This week has also seen Epic Games request for another lawsuit, brought by rapper 2 Milly, to be thrown out. Kotaku reports that the company says that the allegedly infringing emote is too short to be copyrighted, as above. And Epic adds that the Swipe It dance is different enough from the Milly Rock to avoid infringement, even though fans have said that they’re pretty similar. It remains for the courts to determine the validity of that position, but it’s interesting to see what new precedent will be created. Add to Queue Daniel Coopercenter_img –shares This story originally appeared on Engadget February 15, 2019 fortnite Alfonso Ribeiro Image credit: Chris Trotman | Getty Images via engadget Register Now »last_img read more

Warby Parker CoFounder Launching Growth Equity Firm

first_img March 3, 2015 –shares Andy Hunt and Jeremiah Daly have stepped down as partners with Highland Capital Partners, in order to launch their own growth equity firm, Fortune has learned.Hunt is a co-founder and director with eyeglass upstart Warby Parker, and joined HCP back in 2011. He currently serves on the board of Scopely, and has been involved with such HCP portfolio companies as Gemvara, Harry’s and SessionM.Daly joined HCP in early 2012 as a principal, after having spent three years with Accel Partners. He was promoted to partner the following year, and serves on the board of Malwarebytes.News of Hunt and Daly’s pending departure first came earlier today in a letter sent to HCP’s limited partners. It was confirmed by HCP partner Sean Dalton in a phone call with Fortune. Both of their board seats are expected to be filled by other HCP staffers.Neither Hunt nor Daily has yet responded to requests for comment.In other HCP news, longtime chief financial officer Kathy Barry is expected to transition into an advisory role this May, while director of finance Jessica Pelletier will be promoted to senior vice president of finance. Dan Primack Add to Queue Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Next Article 1 min read This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine Warby Parker Co-Founder Launching Growth Equity Firm Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Register Now » Warby Parkerlast_img read more

4 Tips for Successfully Launching a New Product From the CoFounder of

first_imgMarketing Tom Morse knows something about launching products that explode into national best-sellers. The savvy marketer is the co-founder and former president of Living Essentials, the company that put 5-Hour Energy on store shelves everywhere.Before helping to springboard the popular pocket-sized caffeine jolt to a staggering $1.25 billion in estimated yearly sales, Morse worked his product marketing magic on a different kind of pick me up — Chaser, a homeopathic hangover-helper. It, too, sold exceptionally well. Tom Morse, CEO of InstavitImage credit: InstavitNow the Detroit native is the CEO of Instavit, maker of a new line of oral spray health supplements. The flavored supplements, priced at $15.99 per bottle, are designed to enhance sleep, boost energy and fulfill daily multivitamin needs.Related: 3 Essential Stories You Need on Your Website to Attract CustomersMorse says the products are off to a promising start. Launched in the U.S. this past January, he says sales of the supplements at national drugstore chains were up 51 percent during the first two months of this year, month over month in same-store sales. He did not, however, provide specific sales dollar amounts. Here are the veteran marketing wizard’s four top tips for successfully launching a new product:1. Schmooze with retail product buyers at industry trade shows.The first step to getting your product in front of consumers is to put it directly in the hands of retailers’ buyers. They’re typically the people who have the power to sell it at big-box stores throughout the country. One of the best ways to chat your wares up with these key players is to exhibit your product at leading merchandising industry trade shows.“It’s always worth it because you never know who you’re going to meet pacing the expo aisles,” he says. “Talk to everyone because, soon enough, you’ll connect with the right people.”He should know. Soon after 5-Hour Energy’s launch, Morse attracted buyers for the buzzy drink from Walmart and a host of other major multinational retailers while rubbing elbows at back-to-back industry conferences.To find an expo that best fits your product, check out the World Alliance For Retail Excellence and Standards’ list of annual international retail trade shows.Related: 7 Ways to Get the Most Out of Exhibiting at a Trade Show2. Be sure your product solves a common, highly relatable problem.Generally speaking, products that sell like gangbusters simply make consumers’ lives easier. “To create a sales phenomenon, make sure your product fits easily into people’s lives and fixes a problem that a lot of us have,” Morse says. “Make a connection that runs deep with them.”As an example, he points to the original inspiration for Instavit. British surgeon Dr. Jatin Joshi created the product line after he was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. To combat the digestive tract disorder, Joshi had a large portion of his colon removed. Unable to absorb nutrients from food properly post-surgery and fast losing feeling in his fingertips, the doctor was forced to endure routine vitamin injections.Fed up with his painful needle regiment and sick of popping vitamin pills, he invented the micronutrient spray as an alternative. A common problem was solved and a highly marketable product was born.Image credit: InstavitRelated: The 5 Best Pitch Tactics I Heard as an Angel Investor3. Publicize your product’s inspiration story for free. Joshi’s real-life product creation backstory is something his target customers — anyone who takes vitamin supplements but doesn’t like swallowing them — can easily relate to. One way the doctor strategically shared that highly relatable story with potential customers, Morse says, was to strategically broadcast it through a myriad of publications they likely read.“The most brilliant entrepreneurs seek out ways to create demand for product,” he says, “and the most efficient and cost-effective way is to earn coverage from premiere magazines and media outlets. You don’t have to spend any money like you would on ads, yet you’ll still have a big impact.”Related: 4 Ways to Get Publicity on a Budget4. Be ready for sales to take off. It’s not enough to just create a big buzz around your product, in the media and amongst potential retailers and customers. When that buzz catches fire and your product takes off, you have to be prepared to start selling to the masses and hard.“When you have the opportunity to go big, you have to be able to act on it right away,” Morse says. “That means having the resources and know-how to scale up production and having the team to execute.” That way you can hit the ground running and sell, sell, sell.    4 Tips for Successfully Launching a New Product From the Co-Founder of 5-Hour Energy Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Image credit: Spencer Platt / Staff | Getty Images Register Now » –sharescenter_img 5 min read Next Article Add to Queue Kim Lachance Shandrow Former West Coast Editor March 22, 2016last_img read more

Nissan to Develop EthanolBased Fuel Cell Technology by 2020

first_img 2 min read Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Environment Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Add to Queue Image credit: Reuters | Issei Kato Nissan Motor Co. said on Tuesday it was developing fuel cell vehicle (FCV) technology using ethanol as a hydrogen source in what would be an industry first, and planned to commercialize its system in 2020 as part of efforts to develop cleaner cars.The Japanese company said using ethanol, produced from crops including sugar cane and corn, to generate hydrogen-based electricity inside vehicles would be cheaper than fuel cell technology developed separately by rivals Toyota Motor Corp., Honda Motor Co. and Hyundai Motor Co.”The cost and energy required to produce hydrogen can be very high, and it also requires significant investment in (fuelling and storing) infrastructure,” Nissan Executive Vice President Hideyuki Sakamoto told a media briefing. “Compared with that, ethanol is very easy to procure, it is safer to store and lower cost. These are its merits.”Nissan said its technology would be ready for use in vehicles in 2020, adding it could be used to extend the range of larger, electric vehicles such as delivery vans.It would target a cruising range of around 800 kilometers per fueling, more than the range for gasoline-powered vehicles of just over 600 kilometers.The automaker said running costs for the FCVs would be roughly similar to those of electric vehicles, while declining to give details on vehicle pricing.Ethanol is used as a fuel source for vehicles in countries including Brazil, but Nissan is planning to use it to generate electricity in fuel cell stacks to charge batteries which would power vehicle motors.In developing its FCV technology, Nissan joins Toyota and Honda in a national, government-backed drive to develop a “hydrogen society”, in which the zero-emission fuel would be used to power homes and vehicles, and reducing Japan’s reliance on imported fuel sources and nuclear power.Toyota began marketing the Mirai, its hydrogen FCV, in late 2014, while Honda earlier this year began sales of its Clarity Fuel Cell vehicle. Initial production for both models has been limited due to their relatively high cost and limited fueling infrastructure.Unlike its rivals’ offerings, Nissan’s technology does not require hydrogen to be stored in vehicles, reducing the need for expensive bulky hydrogen tanks, and would not require fueling stations, which have been slow to spread globally.(Reporting by Naomi Tajitsu; Editing by Mark Potter) June 14, 2016center_img Register Now » Next Article Nissan to Develop Ethanol-Based Fuel Cell Technology by 2020 Reuters This story originally appeared on Reuters 67shareslast_img read more

FreeWheels Blockgraph Outlines New Path for Building the Future of DataDriven TV

first_imgPresents New Research That Shows Advertisers Eager to Apply Data to TV Advertising; Survey Finds Advertisers Expect 40% of Their TV Advertising Will Be Data-Enabled by 2020Blockgraph, an industry initiative spearheaded to date by FreeWheel, A Comcast Company, in partnership with industry partners, released a new whitepaper entitled Building the Future of Data Driven TV: The Quest to Create a Safe Identity Layer for the Industry.“At Blockgraph, we spend our days helping the TV industry realize its full data-driven potential. Chief among our objectives is making data both easy to use by marketers and safe for data owners and their audiences”The paper offers practical advice for companies moving towards the data-driven future and explores the current approaches for data sharing in the TV industry. The publication also presents the findings from a new research survey of over 150 advertisers and agencies, commissioned from Advertiser Perceptions, on the challenges, opportunities and importance of bringing advanced data to television advertising.According to the survey, the mean percentage of advertisers’ total TV spend that is data-enabled (using data to improve planning, targeting and/or analyze attribution) has grown at a 42% three-year compound annual growth rate. Moreover, it appears that data-enabled TV growth is about to accelerate in 2020, as evidenced by these key findings from the whitepaper below:2018: 20% TV spend data-enabled2019: 29% TV spend data-enabled2020: 40% TV spend expected to be data-enabledMarketing Technology News: Does Gen Z Marketing Hold Key to Brand Loyalty?Yet historically, the TV advertising ecosystem has faced a number of challenges, as substantiated by the survey:Identity Resolution (Low Match Rates) in The New TV Ecosystem: An increase in content options and distribution channels makes it difficult to build a 360-degree view of an advertiser’s targeted audience. Among advertisers, over one-third (36%) said identity resolution was one of the top three barriers preventing them from using data to build audience profiles; only 20% said that they could “easily develop a 360-degree view” of their audience.Industry Dynamics in the Media Supply Chain: Audience relationships and advertising rights are split between a number of distributors and content owners, creating a complex ecosystem of data ownership and sharing. Our survey indicated that 54% of advertisers were concerned about competitive leaks when sharing information with media partners (even via a trusted third-party provider), and only 5% had no concerns about sharing data with media partners.Privacy, Compliance and Data Security: This supply chain complexity places greater demands on companies to ensure consumer privacy and data security. Among advertisers, 79% said protecting consumer privacy was a top concern in 2019, up 10% over 2018.Data Matching and Operational Inefficiencies: As mentioned above, data matching is facilitated by trusted third-party providers outside of the supply chain; however, operational and coordination challenges can make this process inefficient in terms of turnaround time and expenses. In fact, 38% of advertisers cited this as a top-three barrier preventing them from using data to build audience segments for TV.“The findings confirmed that advertisers are eager to bring additional data to TV, similar to their use of data in digital media. Yet, there is also the recognition that TV is different,” said Jason Manningham, General Manager, Blockgraph. “So, while they are bringing more data to TV, the growth, albeit strong, is actually tempered a bit by today’s challenges.”“At Blockgraph, we spend our days helping the TV industry realize its full data-driven potential. Chief among our objectives is making data both easy to use by marketers and safe for data owners and their audiences,” he added. “But it’s always helpful to understand how advertisers are thinking about data holistically, and the challenges that they are facing when it comes to data-driven TV. That was the impetus for our research.”Marketing Technology News: Usabilla Named a Strong Performer in 2019The whitepaper explains how Blockgraph creates industry-wide value in The New TV ecosystem by addressing many of the key challenges of data sharing and identity resolution. By connecting data across the entire TV ecosystem while protecting data ownership and safeguarding consumers’ privacy, Blockgraph will enable TV to pair its exceptional ability to reach and engage mass audiences efficiently, with the breadth and depth of data insights necessary for robust data-driven TV planning, execution, measurement and attribution.“Considering that data is the cornerstone to almost all of the innovation that will make TV a smarter, more efficient, more effective advertising vehicle, we need to solve the sizable challenges that still surround data sharing and activation,” said Dave Clark, General Manager, FreeWheel. “What’s so exciting is that when I talk to clients, and hear their challenges and concerns around data, I know that FreeWheel is uniquely positioned to collaboratively provide solutions on behalf of the entire TV ecosystem. Our Blockgraph initiative offers both an example of our collaborative approach, and a path that can accelerate the growth trajectory of data-driven TV advertising. And it’s here.”Marketing Technology News: AI-Driven Weather Data: New to Some, But It Has Been Driving CustomWeather’s Success for Years BlockgraphData Driven TVFreewheelMarketing Technology NewsNewsSafe Identity Layer Previous ArticleAgari Taps Doug Jones to Drive Corporate Development and StrategyNext ArticleTiVo Names Dave Shull as President and CEO and Provides Improved Business Outlook FreeWheel’s Blockgraph Outlines New Path for Building the Future of Data-Driven TV PRNewswireMay 31, 2019, 7:45 pmMay 31, 2019 last_img read more